13:58
Becky Kuhn, M.D., answers the top ten questions about HIV tests: 1) How do HIV tests work? 2) What are the window period and false negatives? 3) How long after exposure to HIV does it take for a person to test HIV positive? 4) What's the risk of a false positive on the initial ELISA test? 5) What's the risk of a false positive diagnosis after a Western Blot test? 6) Can I be tested for free? 7) Can I be tested without revealing my name? 8) Do I have to be stuck with a needle? 9) If I test HIV positive, does that mean Im going to develop AIDS and die? 10) Why should I get tested? She also explains: anonymous testing; confidential, name-based testing; home-based testing for HIV-1; and use of the PCR Test for detection of HIV infection during the window period. There is a 98.5% chance that an "HIV positive" result on an initial ELISA test is correct (and a 1.5% chance that it was a false positive). There is a 99.9996% chance that an "HIV positive" result after an initial ELISA *and* a confirmatory Western Blot test is correct (and 1 chance in 250,000 that it was a false positive). HIV denialists (people who deny that HIV is the cause of AIDS) often exaggerate the frequency of false positives and ignore the fact that a person must get an "HIV positive" result on BOTH the initial ELISA *and* the confirmatory Western Blot test before the person is given a diagnosis of "HIV positive." If you have taken both an ELISA test and a Western Blot test and your doctor tells you you are HIV positive, believe them! Distributed by Tubemogul.
  • 6 Mar 2009
  • 714
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6:58
Becky Kuhn, M.D., describes the symptoms of AIDS. According to the United States Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, the symptoms include: * "rapid weight loss" * "dry cough" * "recurring fever or profuse night sweats" * "profound and unexplained fatigue" * "swollen lymph glands in the armpits, groin, or neck" * "diarrhea that lasts for more than a week" * "white spots or unusual blemishes on the tongue, in the mouth, or in the throat" * "pneumonia" * "red, brown, pink, or purplish blotches on or under the skin or inside the mouth, nose, or eyelids" * "memory loss, depression, and other neurological disorders" If you have one or more of these symptoms, does it necessarily mean you are infected with HIV or have developed AIDS? No. Many common diseases can cause one or more of these symptoms. For example, most people with a fever or sore throat are probably just experiencing common illnesses such as the cold, influenza, or mononucleosis. A person is only diagnosed if they are confirmed HIV+ and also either have a CD4 count under 200 or have an opportunistic infection that is indicative of a weakened immune system. So don't panic. But if you have any of these symptoms and think theres even the slightest chance you might ever have been exposed to HIV, you should see a doctor and ask to be tested for HIV. Remember, the CDC recommends that all adults be tested for HIV regardless of whether they believe they have any risk factors or exposure to HIV and regardless of whether they have any symptoms of HIV/AIDS. Get tested! [Source: "How can I tell if I'm infected with HIV? What are the symptoms?" United States Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Accessed 21 June 2008. Last updated 22 January 2007.] Distributed by Tubemogul.
  • 6 Mar 2009
  • 3 425
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0:29
"DON'T" is a public service announcement that uses stark white text on a black background to grab the user's attention with a series of paradoxical, ridiculous statements. Then, once the user's attention has been grabbed, it finishes with a conventional HIV/AIDS awareness message pointing out that AIDS kills and how ridiculous the preceding statements were. We expect that users have already seen hundreds of conventional AIDS prevention education messages and probably tune them out when they come on TV or the web. This is an attempt to "shake people up" with a message that is fresh and unexpected. Distributed by Tubemogul.
  • 21 May 2009
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7:10
Danny West is a trainer, coach, and leadership consultant, has been living with HIV for the past 24 years, and remains healthy today. When he was diagnosed with HIV, he was given 18 months to live, so he decided to take long-term sickness leave and take stock of his situation. Since then, being HIV positive has been the springboard for leading the life of his dreams. Back in the late 80s and early 90s, the focus of HIV was on death and dying. He has seen many friends and family members die of HIV/AIDS. His first partner with AIDS introduced him to the founder of London Lighthouse, the first centre in the UK for people with HIV which provided drop-in services, respite care, and a hospice service. Danny got involved with HIV support organizations and did HIV training. In the late 90s, Danny decided to take care of his health and took a number of years off. He’s now been successfully treated on antiretroviral medications (ARVs) for five years, and he wanted to do something proactive, so he set up his own training, coaching and leadership consultancy and is now a qualified professional coach. Today, with ARVs, people are now living with HIV, so Danny wants to contribute to that culture of life. For more information, visit http://www.ryl-training-consultancy.co.uk/ and http://www.AIDSvideos.org/.
  • 1 Jun 2008
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1:28
Danny West is a trainer, coach, and leadership consultant, has been living with HIV for the past 24 years, and remains healthy today, having been treated successfully with antiretroviral medications (ARVs) for the last five years. HIV is no longer a death sentence. Thanks to effective medical care and the use of ARVs when appropriate, people are now living with HIV long-term on combination therapies (the “triple cocktail”). It’s important to realize that ARVs are not a cure for HIV/AIDS. They support and maintain your immune system. When they work effectively, the can enable you to live long-term with HIV. Danny West has realized that he may live into his sixties or seventies. This means he has to plan for his future and a retirement period. Coaching has helped him do that. For more information, visit http://www.ryl-training-consultancy.co.uk/ and http://www.AIDSvideos.org/.
  • 1 Jun 2008
  • 250
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2:26
Danny West is a trainer, coach, and leadership consultant, has been living with HIV for the past 24 years, and remains healthy today, having been treated successfully with antiretroviral medications (ARVs) for the last five years. What’s the secret to his longevity? He feels that positive thinking and the determination to live a fulfilled life in which he can make a significant difference is the most important thing. He tries to avoid stress as much as possible and to manage stress by getting adequate sleep, having a balanced diet, exercising, having massages, swimming, taking walks in the country, and balancing work with time to relax. One of the most significant factors is that he has a very good support network of people around him who he can talk to and share his thoughts and feelings with. He has access to multiple support groups and his own coach. Danny thinks it’s important to talk about HIV, your feelings, and what’s going on in your life on a daily basis. He can’t say for sure why he’s still alive and healthy today, but dying of HIV has never been an option for him. He’s had an incredible life because he MADE IT HAPPEN. For more information, visit http://www.ryl-training-consultancy.co.uk/ and http://www.AIDSvideos.org/.
  • 2 Jun 2008
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1:33
Danny West is a trainer, coach, and leadership consultant, has been living with HIV for the past 24 years, and remains healthy today. In this video he discusses the impact of HIV/AIDS on the United Kingdom. About 17,500 people in the UK have died of AIDS, and about 88,000 people are living with HIV/AIDS today. In the early 1980s, the government launched an educational campaign that used images of death and the Grim Reaper. This had a negative effect by increasing fear. As a result, the majority of people in the UK who are HIV positive don’t know their HIV positive status. People mistakenly believe that HIV is a disease limited to gay mean, injection drug users, and other perceived high risk groups. But worldwide, the majority of people who are living with HIV or have died from AIDS have been heterosexual. For more information, visit http://www.ryl-training-consultancy.co.uk/ and http://www.AIDSvideos.org/.
  • 1 Jun 2008
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2:10
Danny West is a trainer, coach, and leadership consultant, has been living with HIV for the past 24 years, and remains healthy today. There are many ways to get involved in the fight against HIV if you are interested in making a difference. There are many organizations that need volunteers to help with delivering food, educational campaigns, helping people who live at home with HIV, and more. You can also encourage your local schools to provide education about HIV prevention. Sex is a taboo in the United Kingdom and elsewhere in the developed world, and sexual contact is the primary way that HIV is transmitted. In the UK, many schools don’t provide sex education at all, so it’s unlikely they will talk about HIV. It’s very important to educate students about HIV prevention education. For more information, visit http://www.ryl-training-consultancy.co.uk/ and http://www.AIDSvideos.org/.
  • 1 Jun 2008
  • 280
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2:17
Danny West is a trainer, coach, and leadership consultant, has been living with HIV for the past 24 years, and remains healthy today. As a person living with HIV, Danny West is committed to providing leadership in the world in the fight against HIV, stigma, and related problems. There are now laws in the United Kingdom to protect the human rights of people living with HIV/AIDS, and with the advent of combination therapy, Danny West feels that the time is right for people living with HIV/AIDS to take a leadership role on these issues. Contrary to common stereotypes, people living with HIV/AIDS aren’t just gay men, injection drug users, or African. They come from all ethnic groups, walks of life, and nationalities. Danny’s company has developed a range of leadership programs for people living with HIV. They are also attempting to initiate a nationwide leadership program. For more information, visit http://www.ryl-training-consultancy.co.uk/ and http://www.AIDSvideos.org/.
  • 1 Jun 2008
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2:11
Danny West is a trainer, coach, and leadership consultant, has been living with HIV for the past 24 years, and remains healthy today. It’s important to realize that combination therapy with antiretroviral medications is not a cure. It will help your immune system fight HIV, but the person with HIV can still transmit the virus to others through routes such as sexual contact and needle sharing. The stigma and prejudice associated with HIV is one of the major issues that people living with HIV are challenged with. People with HIV are still discriminated against. They may lose their job, mortgage, or contact with family members because of HIV stigma. Sometimes, they are even attacked and murdered. So having HIV still matters, and if you’re HIV negative, make choices to make sure you stay that way! For more information, visit http://www.ryl-training-consultancy.co.uk/ and http://www.AIDSvideos.org/.
  • 1 Jun 2008
  • 298
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2:00
Danny West is a trainer, coach, and leadership consultant, has been living with HIV for the past 24 years, and remains healthy today, having been successfully treated with antiretroviral medications (ARVs) for the last five years. There are many treatments available today for HIV. Anyone who is on “combination therapy” is on a combination of multiple drugs. Early on, Danny was treated with AZT alone. In his case, the side effects of AZT monotherapy bothered him and he decided to go off AZT at that time. Since then, more antiretroviral medications have been developed, and he is now on a combination therapy that works well for him and has minimal side effects that he can manage and live with. The side effects no longer interfere with his everyday life. His viral load is undetectable, and his CD4 count is increasing. His immune system is functioning effectively and is keeping HIV at bay. For more information, visit http://www.ryl-training-consultancy.co.uk/ and http://www.AIDSvideos.org/.
  • 1 Jun 2008
  • 278
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1:13
Danny West is a trainer, coach, and leadership consultant, has been living with HIV for the past 24 years, and remains healthy today. He realized early on that HIV is just another virus; after HIV, there will be other viruses. But HIV is “unique” in that it raises society’s taboos such as death, dying, sex, sexuality, addiction, disability, and illness—all the things people are reluctant to talk about. So it’s no surprise that people are reluctant to learn about HIV and seek out up-to-date, accurate information about it. This problem perpetuates the epidemic.
  • 1 Jun 2008
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3:12
Danny West is a trainer, coach, and leadership consultant, has been living with HIV for the past 24 years, and remains healthy today. One of his roles at RYL Training and Coaching Consultancy is providing people with accurate information about HIV/AIDS. He doesn’t specifically encourage people to take the HIV test, but he helps people to think through the issues involved in making the decision of whether or not to be tested for HIV so they can make an informed choice. Being diagnosed HIV positive has many implications that must be considered before taking the HIV test. There is still much discrimination against people who are living with HIV. In the United Kingdom, it’s difficult to get a job, mortgage, or life insurance if you are HIV positive. It is difficult to travel to certain countries if you are HIV positive. There are many restrictions placed on people with HIV due to fear and ignorance. Danny doesn’t normally give advice, but he encourages people considering the HIV test to get enough information to make an informed decision. Next, think about the impact that an HIV positive test result would have on your life, who you would tell, and how they would react. Isolation is a killer, so think about who would be willing to provide you support if your result is HIV positive. For more information, visit http://www.ryl-training-consultancy.co.uk/ and http://www.AIDSvideos.org/.
  • 2 Jun 2008
  • 213
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1:22
Danny West is a trainer, coach, and leadership consultant, has been living with HIV for the past 24 years, and remains healthy today. Many countries restrict entry by people who are living with HIV. For example, to travel to the United States, Danny has to get a special visa waiver that declares he has HIV and requests permission to enter the United States. Other countries bar entry completely. Travel restrictions are one more issue that a person must think about when they are considering being tested for HIV and when considering the impact that an HIV diagnosis might have on their lives. For more information, visit http://www.ryl-training-consultancy.co.uk/ and http://www.AIDSvideos.org/.
  • 10 Nov 2009
  • 447
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1:07
Danny West is a trainer, coach, and leadership consultant, has been living with HIV for the past 24 years, and remains healthy today. One of the reasons that Danny West is passionate about coaching and HIV prevention education is that he wants to provide a positive role model of a person living with HIV. He lives a happy and fulfilled life and he is determined to challenge discrimination and prejudice and influence equality for people living with HIV. For more information, visit http://www.ryl-training-consultancy.co.uk/ and http://www.AIDSvideos.org/.
  • 1 Jun 2008
  • 251
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9:02
El VIH / SIDA puede afectar gravemente su vida e incluso causarle la muerte. Si sigue las instrucciones de este vídeo, puede reducir o eliminar el riesgo de contraer el VIH, el virus que causa el SIDA, salvar su vida, salvar la vida de cualquier presente o futura pareja sexual, y si usted es una mujer, salvar la vida de sus futuros hijos. SIDA significa Síndrome de Inmunodeficiencia Adquirida. Es una enfermedad causada por el virus de la inmunodeficiencia humana el cual es(VIH). Una persona puede ser infectada con el VIH y ni siquiera saberlo. Después de que una persona ha contraído el VIH, incluso antes de que la prueba salga positiva, es posible que transmita la infección a otras personas. Si el VIH daña demasiado al sistema inmunológico de la persona, el sistema se vuelve peligrosamente débil, y la persona se vuelve mucho mas vulnerable a las infecciones en compracion a una persona que con un sistema inmunológico sano, podría combatir facilmente. La primera forma es por medio del contacto sexual. La segunda manera es por medio del intercambio de agujas entre personas que usan drogas inyectadas. La tercera manera es la transmisión de la madre al niño. Para reducir el riesgo de contraer el VIH a través del contacto sexual, recuerden de: abstenerse de relaciones sexuales antes del matrimonio, ser fiel a una sola pareja, si usted es sexualmente activo, siempre use un condón de látex cada vez que tenga relaciones sexuales.
  • 7 May 2008
  • 3 257
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6:54
Cass Mann is one of the world's longest-term HIV-positive diagnosed gay men, now in his third decade of living with HIV, and the founder of UK’s only gay men’s HIV/AIDS charity Positively Healthy, which provides HIV services including education, support, and peer counselling. Here he talks about alternatives to anal sex and oral sex that don't carry the risk of HIV transmission. Mutual masturbation and rubbing against your partner do not risk HIV transmission. We in the West have a "wham bam" culture in which these alternatives may seem less exciting at first, but they can be very pleasurable. You can investigate Tantric sexuality, Taoism, or the Kama Sutra for gay men. "Wham bam" sex isn't nurturing; it's almost always abusive, violent, and non-nurturing. These alternatives are nurturing and enlightening. They activate all your chakras, leading to an awakening. For more information about HIV and AIDS, visit http://www.posh-uk.org.uk/ and http://www.AIDSvideos.org/.
  • 12 Dec 2008
  • 5 163
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