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  • 1
    Do I Have Syphilis? Signs and Symptoms of Syphilis 08:29

    Do I Have Syphilis? Signs and Symptoms of Syphilis

    by AIDSvideos (4/10/12) 99 views

    Learn the signs and symptoms of syphilis. See a doctor, get tested, and follow their instructions if you have symptoms of any sexually transmitted infection or think you may have been exposed to one. Syphilis is a common sexually transmitted infection that can cause serious illness. Having an active syphilis infection increases the risk you will get HIV or give HIV to someone else. HIV is incurable and can be fatal. If you are a pregnant woman, syphilis increases the risk that the pregnancy will end in miscarriage, death of the baby at birth or in infancy, or permanent disabilities for your baby. Fortunately, syphilis can be diagnosed with a blood test and cured with antibiotics. You can have syphilis without knowing it. The symptoms are not always noticeable. If you think you may have been exposed to or infected with any sexually transmitted infection, see a doctor and get tested whether or not you have any symptoms. All pregnant women should be checked for syphilis, HIV, and other sexually transmitted infections. Syphilis is usually transmitted by vaginal, oral, or anal sexual contact. The second most common way syphilis is transmitted is from mother to child during the pregnancy, or during delivery. You can also get syphilis by kissing on or near a syphilis sore or by touching an infected area on the person. Soon after infection, a sore develops that is usually round, hard, raised, and painless. Usually the sore is on the genitals, hands, or mouth. Usually, there is just one, but sometimes there can be multiple sores. Without treatment, the sore will usually heal within three to six weeks. In many people with syphilis, lymph nodes near the sore will swell up, especially if the sore is near the genitals. Lymph nodes are small balls in your neck, underarms, groin, and knees that help fight infections. Even after the initial sore has healed, your lymph nodes may stay enlarged. Without treatment, the infection will usually develop into secondary syphilis between three and six weeks after the sore appears. At this stage, you may have flu-like symptoms, a sore throat, feel tired, lose your appetite, or have swollen lymph nodes. Most commonly, you will have a rash of red or pink spots on your body. The spots may become similar to a pimple or a mark. The spots will often appear on the sides of your body, your arms, or your genitals or on the palms of your hands or the soles of your feet. You may also get white or gray spots on your mouth or genitals. A few people will lose patches of hair from their scalp, beard or eyebrows. You may also develop problems with your kidneys, eyes, liver, bones, or joints; meningitis; or deafness. In the final stage of syphilis, you may develop spots on your body, most commonly on the skin, bone, or liver. The skin spots may turn into ulcers. You may also develop dementia, paralysis, and damage to the spinal cord and brain. At any stage of syphilis, you may also develop meningitis, headaches, nausea, vision and hearing problems, dizziness, memory and speech problems, irritability, and delusions. If you are a woman who is pregnant or who may become pregnant, it is vital that you be tested for syphilis. If you are pregnant, have syphilis, and don't get treated, more than two-thirds of the time, your pregnancy will have a poor outcome. [This video is freely downloadable from the Internet Archive at http://archive.org/details/DoIHaveSyphilisSignsAndSymptomsOfSyphilis. Visit http://www.GlobalLifeworks.org and http://AIDSvideos.org to learn more. Do you want to help prevent the spread of HIV/AIDS? Are you fluent in a language other than English? Then volunteer to translate our videos into other languages! Click http://AIDSvideos.org/translate.shtml to to learn how you can help!!! © Copyright 2011-2012 Global Lifeworks. All rights reserved. This work is licensed to be used for non-commercial purposes under the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs 3.0 Unported License. To view a copy of this license, visit http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/3.0/.]

  • 2
    The Top Ten Questions About HIV Tests 13:58

    The Top Ten Questions About HIV Tests

    by AIDSvideos (3/5/09) 575 views

    Becky Kuhn, M.D., answers the top ten questions about HIV tests: 1) How do HIV tests work? 2) What are the window period and false negatives? 3) How long after exposure to HIV does it take for a person to test HIV positive? 4) What's the risk of a false positive on the initial ELISA test? 5) What's the risk of a false positive diagnosis after a Western Blot test? 6) Can I be tested for free? 7) Can I be tested without revealing my name? 8) Do I have to be stuck with a needle? 9) If I test HIV positive, does that mean Im going to develop AIDS and die? 10) Why should I get tested? She also explains: anonymous testing; confidential, name-based testing; home-based testing for HIV-1; and use of the PCR Test for detection of HIV infection during the window period. There is a 98.5% chance that an "HIV positive" result on an initial ELISA test is correct (and a 1.5% chance that it was a false positive). There is a 99.9996% chance that an "HIV positive" result after an initial ELISA *and* a confirmatory Western Blot test is correct (and 1 chance in 250,000 that it was a false positive). HIV denialists (people who deny that HIV is the cause of AIDS) often exaggerate the frequency of false positives and ignore the fact that a person must get an "HIV positive" result on BOTH the initial ELISA *and* the confirmatory Western Blot test before the person is given a diagnosis of "HIV positive." If you have taken both an ELISA test and a Western Blot test and your doctor tells you you are HIV positive, believe them! Distributed by Tubemogul.

  • 3
    Do I Have AIDS? Symptoms of AIDS 06:57

    Do I Have AIDS? Symptoms of AIDS

    by AIDSvideos (3/5/09) 3,330 views

    Becky Kuhn, M.D., describes the symptoms of AIDS. According to the United States Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, the symptoms include: * "rapid weight loss" * "dry cough" * "recurring fever or profuse night sweats" * "profound and unexplained fatigue" * "swollen lymph glands in the armpits, groin, or neck" * "diarrhea that lasts for more than a week" * "white spots or unusual blemishes on the tongue, in the mouth, or in the throat" * "pneumonia" * "red, brown, pink, or purplish blotches on or under the skin or inside the mouth, nose, or eyelids" * "memory loss, depression, and other neurological disorders" If you have one or more of these symptoms, does it necessarily mean you are infected with HIV or have developed AIDS? No. Many common diseases can cause one or more of these symptoms. For example, most people with a fever or sore throat are probably just experiencing common illnesses such as the cold, influenza, or mononucleosis. A person is only diagnosed if they are confirmed HIV+ and also either have a CD4 count under 200 or have an opportunistic infection that is indicative of a weakened immune system. So don't panic. But if you have any of these symptoms and think theres even the slightest chance you might ever have been exposed to HIV, you should see a doctor and ask to be tested for HIV. Remember, the CDC recommends that all adults be tested for HIV regardless of whether they believe they have any risk factors or exposure to HIV and regardless of whether they have any symptoms of HIV/AIDS. Get tested! [Source: "How can I tell if I'm infected with HIV? What are the symptoms?" United States Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Accessed 21 June 2008. Last updated 22 January 2007.] Distributed by Tubemogul.

  • 4

    "DON'T," a 30 Second PSA Promoting HIV/AIDS Testing and Condo...

    by AIDSvideos (3/6/09) 790 views

    "DON'T" is a public service announcement that uses stark white text on a black background to grab the user's attention with a series of paradoxical, ridiculous statements. Then, once the user's attention has been grabbed, it finishes with a conventional HIV/AIDS awareness message pointing out that AIDS kills and how ridiculous the preceding statements were. We expect that users have already seen hundreds of conventional AIDS prevention education messages and probably tune them out when they come on TV or the web. This is an attempt to "shake people up" with a message that is fresh and unexpected. Distributed by Tubemogul.

  • 5
    Danny West: My Journey With HIV/AIDS 07:09

    Danny West: My Journey With HIV/AIDS

    by AIDSvideos (6/1/08) 314 views

    Danny West is a trainer, coach, and leadership consultant, has been living with HIV for the past 24 years, and remains healthy today. When he was diagnosed with HIV, he was given 18 months to live, so he decided to take long-term sickness leave and take stock of his situation. Since then, being HIV positive has been the springboard for leading the life of his dreams. Back in the late 80s and early 90s, the focus of HIV was on death and dying. He has seen many friends and family members die of HIV/AIDS. His first partner with AIDS introduced him to the founder of London Lighthouse, the first centre in the UK for people with HIV which provided drop-in services, respite care, and a hospice service. Danny got involved with HIV support organizations and did HIV training. In the late 90s, Danny decided to take care of his health and took a number of years off. He’s now been successfully treated on antiretroviral medications (ARVs) for five years, and he wanted to do something proactive, so he set up his own training, coaching and leadership consultancy and is now a qualified professional coach. Today, with ARVs, people are now living with HIV, so Danny wants to contribute to that culture of life. For more information, visit http://www.ryl-training-consultancy.co.uk/ and http://www.AIDSvideos.org/.

  • 6
    How Antiretroviral Medications (ARVs) Keep Me Healthy 01:28

    How Antiretroviral Medications (ARVs) Keep Me Healthy

    by AIDSvideos (6/1/08) 180 views

    Danny West is a trainer, coach, and leadership consultant, has been living with HIV for the past 24 years, and remains healthy today, having been treated successfully with antiretroviral medications (ARVs) for the last five years. HIV is no longer a death sentence. Thanks to effective medical care and the use of ARVs when appropriate, people are now living with HIV long-term on combination therapies (the “triple cocktail”). It’s important to realize that ARVs are not a cure for HIV/AIDS. They support and maintain your immune system. When they work effectively, the can enable you to live long-term with HIV. Danny West has realized that he may live into his sixties or seventies. This means he has to plan for his future and a retirement period. Coaching has helped him do that. For more information, visit http://www.ryl-training-consultancy.co.uk/ and http://www.AIDSvideos.org/.

  • 7
    Living Positively with HIV and Keeping Yourself Healthy 02:26

    Living Positively with HIV and Keeping Yourself Healthy

    by AIDSvideos (6/1/08) 239 views

    Danny West is a trainer, coach, and leadership consultant, has been living with HIV for the past 24 years, and remains healthy today, having been treated successfully with antiretroviral medications (ARVs) for the last five years. What’s the secret to his longevity? He feels that positive thinking and the determination to live a fulfilled life in which he can make a significant difference is the most important thing. He tries to avoid stress as much as possible and to manage stress by getting adequate sleep, having a balanced diet, exercising, having massages, swimming, taking walks in the country, and balancing work with time to relax. One of the most significant factors is that he has a very good support network of people around him who he can talk to and share his thoughts and feelings with. He has access to multiple support groups and his own coach. Danny thinks it’s important to talk about HIV, your feelings, and what’s going on in your life on a daily basis. He can’t say for sure why he’s still alive and healthy today, but dying of HIV has never been an option for him. He’s had an incredible life because he MADE IT HAPPEN. For more information, visit http://www.ryl-training-consultancy.co.uk/ and http://www.AIDSvideos.org/.

  • 8
    HIV/AIDS in the United Kingdom 01:32

    HIV/AIDS in the United Kingdom

    by AIDSvideos (6/1/08) 761 views

    Danny West is a trainer, coach, and leadership consultant, has been living with HIV for the past 24 years, and remains healthy today. In this video he discusses the impact of HIV/AIDS on the United Kingdom. About 17,500 people in the UK have died of AIDS, and about 88,000 people are living with HIV/AIDS today. In the early 1980s, the government launched an educational campaign that used images of death and the Grim Reaper. This had a negative effect by increasing fear. As a result, the majority of people in the UK who are HIV positive don’t know their HIV positive status. People mistakenly believe that HIV is a disease limited to gay mean, injection drug users, and other perceived high risk groups. But worldwide, the majority of people who are living with HIV or have died from AIDS have been heterosexual. For more information, visit http://www.ryl-training-consultancy.co.uk/ and http://www.AIDSvideos.org/.

  • 9
    Ways to Get Involved in the Fight Against HIV 02:10

    Ways to Get Involved in the Fight Against HIV

    by AIDSvideos (6/1/08) 215 views

    Danny West is a trainer, coach, and leadership consultant, has been living with HIV for the past 24 years, and remains healthy today. There are many ways to get involved in the fight against HIV if you are interested in making a difference. There are many organizations that need volunteers to help with delivering food, educational campaigns, helping people who live at home with HIV, and more. You can also encourage your local schools to provide education about HIV prevention. Sex is a taboo in the United Kingdom and elsewhere in the developed world, and sexual contact is the primary way that HIV is transmitted. In the UK, many schools don’t provide sex education at all, so it’s unlikely they will talk about HIV. It’s very important to educate students about HIV prevention education. For more information, visit http://www.ryl-training-consultancy.co.uk/ and http://www.AIDSvideos.org/.

  • 10
    Danny West on Providing Leadership in the Fight Against HIV 02:16

    Danny West on Providing Leadership in the Fight Against HIV

    by AIDSvideos (6/1/08) 176 views

    Danny West is a trainer, coach, and leadership consultant, has been living with HIV for the past 24 years, and remains healthy today. As a person living with HIV, Danny West is committed to providing leadership in the world in the fight against HIV, stigma, and related problems. There are now laws in the United Kingdom to protect the human rights of people living with HIV/AIDS, and with the advent of combination therapy, Danny West feels that the time is right for people living with HIV/AIDS to take a leadership role on these issues. Contrary to common stereotypes, people living with HIV/AIDS aren’t just gay men, injection drug users, or African. They come from all ethnic groups, walks of life, and nationalities. Danny’s company has developed a range of leadership programs for people living with HIV. They are also attempting to initiate a nationwide leadership program. For more information, visit http://www.ryl-training-consultancy.co.uk/ and http://www.AIDSvideos.org/.

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