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  • 1
    Paella

    Paella

    by Black Book Cooking (7/28/13) 3 views

    In Spain, paella is nothing short of a national passion. It’s not difficult and if you love risotto, you’ll love Paella. The preparation methods are similar. You’ll need fish stock, saffron threads, oil, fish fillets, Spanish onion, garlic, Spanish or Arborio rice, tomatoes, smoked paprika, mixed seafood and frozen peas. Cook fish and seafood till golden then set aside. Add more oil and cook onions and garlic till soft then add rice, saffron, paprika and peas and stir to combine. Return the seafood and press it into the rice, cover and allow to cook through. Turn off the heat and cover the pan with a tea towel. Allow to stand for 5 to 10 minutes before serving.

  • 2
    Coddled Eggs

    Coddled Eggs

    by Black Book Cooking (7/21/13) 0 views

    Coddling is a gentle steaming method of cooking eggs in individual ceramic or glass coddling cups. It produces a tender egg that can be served in the coddler or on toast. You’ll need double cream, eggs and freshly ground black pepper to taste. Begin by lining the bottom of a saucepan with a paper towel then fill it with enough water to come just below the rim of the coddlers then bring it to the boil. Coat each coddler with cooking spray and pour a little cream in each, add the eggs and seasoning. Carefully place the coddler into the boiling water, reduce the heat and simmer for 4 minutes. Turn off the heat, cover the pan and let stand for 6 to 7 minutes. Remove eggs and serve immediately.

  • 3
    Chicken Liver Pate

    Chicken Liver Pate

    by Black Book Cooking (7/14/13) 3 views

    My chicken liver pate is easy and fast and makes a great little appetiser when entertaining. You’ll need chicken livers, onion, garlic, chicken stock, salt, butter, oil, pepper, cognac or grand marnier, thickened cream and liquid aspic jelly. Sauté the onions and garlic and add the livers and just enough stock to cover the livers. Bring to a boil then gently simmer for 15 to 20 minutes. Remove from the heat and allow to cool. In a blender mix the livers with salt, pepper, cream and cognac and blend until smooth. Pour the mixture into a terrine, decorate with slices of orange and pour a layer of warm aspic jelly over top then cover with plastic wrap and refrigerate to set.

  • 4
    Beef Wellington

    Beef Wellington

    by Black Book Cooking (7/8/13) 5 views

    Beef Wellington has been around for a long time. A great alternative to a Sunday roast. Ingredients include a beef fillet, chicken liver pate, chopped eschallots and mushrooms, brandy, puff pastry, egg yolk and salt and pepper. Fry off the eschallots and mushrooms until softened, then set aside to cool. Sear the beef then add the brandy and flambé. Allow to cool slightly. Spread the pate over the beef and spread the mushroom mixture over the pastry. Place the beef on the mushrooms, spread with remaining pate and top with remaining mushrooms. Cover with another sheet of pastry and seal the edges. Pierce to allow steam to escape then brush with egg yolk. Bake until pastry is golden and beef is cooked as to your liking.

  • 5
    Pea and Ham Soup

    Pea and Ham Soup

    by Black Book Cooking (7/1/13) 3 views

    It’s hard to beat Pea and ham soup on a cold night. To make this winter favourite you’ll need a smoked ham hock, split peas, a mirepoix of onion, carrot, celery, leek and garlic, chicken stock, and herbs bay, thyme, coriander and parsley and salt and pepper to taste. For a bit of spice add dried chilli flakes. Heat some butter in a large saucepan, add the mirepoix and cook till soft and aromatic. Add the ham hock, bay leaves, thyme and split peas. Increase heat to high, add the stock and bring to a boil. Reduce and simmer, partially covered until the peas are soft. Remove the hock, and take the meat off the bone and reserve. Puree the soup, return the meat, bring to a boil and add the coriander and parsley.

  • 6
    Love Food Hate Waste Water

    Love Food Hate Waste Water

    by Black Book Cooking (6/27/13) 1 views

    The single largest impact Australian households have on water consumption is through the food we waste. Just think about all the water that’s needed to grow fruit, vegetables, cereals, grains and to support livestock. According to CSIRO data, throwing out a kilogram of beef wastes the 50,000 litres of water it took to produce that meat. Throwing out one kilogram of white rice wastes 1,550 litres and discarding one kilogram of potatoes wastes 500 litres of water. Being less wasteful with food is one of the best ways you can reduce water consumption. Distributed by OneLoad.com

  • 7
    Cooking Scallops

    Cooking Scallops

    by Black Book Cooking (6/26/13) 1 views

    With a little know how you too can cook restaurant-quality scallops dishes at home. When cooking, scallops should not be cooked for long. 3 to 4 minutes is usually enough because they quickly start to become tough, dry and flavourless. Small scallops can be cooked whole but larger ones should be cut into pieces or slices. The beauty of scallops is they can be eaten raw or cooked and are simply delicious with just a little lemon juice. They are great for sashimi or ceviche. Prepared in a wide variety of ways, they can be grilled, poached, breaded, sautéed, steamed, fried, marinated, or cooked au gratin. The ovenproof shells can also be used as cooking or serving dishes. Distributed by OneLoad.com

  • 8
    Preparing and Using Rhubarb

    Preparing and Using Rhubarb

    by Black Book Cooking (6/25/13) 13 views

    Rhubarb is delicious and at its peak during Autumn and Winter. Technically it is a vegetable but we serve it like a fruit. Here’s how to prepare and use this rosy-red delight. Trim off the leaf ends and the lower ends of the stalks then wash the stalks and cut them into 2cm pieces. If the stems are too fibrous you may need pull off the strings as you do with celery. Rhubarb is sometimes eaten raw, coated with a little sugar or salt; however, it is more commonly cooked and made into compote, marmalade or marinades. It is also baked in pies, cakes and muffins and incorporated into sorbets, ice cream and punches. Rhubarb blends deliciously with other fruits and especially with strawberries and apples. Distributed by OneLoad.com

  • 9
    Using Tongue

    Using Tongue

    by Black Book Cooking (6/24/13) 6 views

    Whilst most people might turn their noses up at the thought of eating tongue, it is actually a very versatile meat. Pickled or fresh, hot or cold, it offers endless possibilities for the cook. Here’s a few ideas on different ways to serve tongue…Fresh ox tongue combines well with rabbit to make a wonderful hot sausage, and sliced tongue with a glaze or sauce is a simple but impressively flavoursome dish. Pickled tongue can be served hot, and is an interesting addition to a cold meat platter. Julienned, it also goes very well with pasta. Pressed ox tongue is another old-fashioned favourite. And lambs’ tongues, which of course are considerably smaller than ox tongues are most often served sliced in salads, or in a jellied mould. Distributed by OneLoad.com

  • 10
    Buying and Preparing Rabbit

    Buying and Preparing Rabbit

    by Black Book Cooking (6/23/13) 1 views

    Rabbit is rich in protein, B-complex vitamins, calcium, and potassium. It’s also a good source of iron and phosphorus. Here’s what to look for and how to prepare rabbit at home. When buying a fresh whole rabbit, ensure that the legs are still flexible and choose a rabbit with shiny, slightly pink skin, an unmarked red liver, clearly visible red kidneys and very white fat. When cutting a whole rabbit into pieces, first remove the four legs, and then divide the saddle into two or three pieces. If the animal is large enough, you may want to cut the relatively fleshy rear legs into two pieces. Before cooking, wash and then soak the rabbit for a few hours in lightly salted cold water; this will bleach the meat and give it a more delicate flavour. Distributed by OneLoad.com

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