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Hillary Clinton Steps Up controversial Ad Wars against Barack Obama, Asks Who Voters Want 'Answering the Phone' in Crisis Hillary Clinton on Friday stepped up the ad wars with Barack Obama, releasing a 30-second TV spot that hammered away at her campaign’s theme that she will be “ready to lead from Day One” — and that the Obama campaign dismissed as fear-mongering. The new ad shows images of children sleeping in their homes and asks viewers who they want “answering the phone” in the White House during a crisis. The Obama campaign retaliated by re-releasing an ad in which retired Gen. Merrill “Tony” McPeak praises the Illinois senator for his judgment in opposing the Iraq war. Obama said Clinton is just trying to “scare up” votes. “I don’t think these ads will work this time because the question’s not about picking up the phone, it is about what kind of judgment will you exercise when you pick up that phone,” Obama said in Houston Friday. “We have had a red phone moment — it was the decision to invade Iraq. Senator Clinton gave the wrong answer.” Clinton’s new ad underscores her insistence that she has more experience than Obama. It is being launched in Texas, which holds its primary on Tuesday and where she is now trailing Obama in some polls. The ad begins with a somber voiceover that says: “It’s 3 a.m. and your children are safe and asleep. But there’s a phone in the White House and it’s ringing. Something’s happening in the world. “Your vote will decide who answers that call … whether it’s someone who already knows the world’s leaders, knows the military — someone tested and ready to lead in a dangerous world.” After panning across shots of babies and children sleeping in a quiet suburban setting, the ad cuts to Clinton answering that ringing phone. “I will never see the threat of terrorism as a way to scare up votes because it is a threat that should rally the country around our common enemies,” Obama said in response. “That is the judgment we need at 3 a.m.” Obama campaign manager David Plouffe noted that the ad is similar to one created for Walter Mondale during the 1984 Democratic presidential campaign. That ad, produced by Clinton adviser Roy Spence, showed a red phone in a dark room and intoned: “the most awesome, powerful responsibility in the world lies in the hand that picks up this phone.” The ad voiceover said Mondale’s ability to know what he’s doing in a crisis was the difference between him and then-primary rival Gary Hart. Democratic strategist Kelly Bingel said the Clinton spot even reminded her of the controversial ’60s “Daisy” ad from Lyndon B. Johnson’s campaign that showed a little girl playing a field to the backdrop of a nuclear attack. “That’s a pretty harsh ad, but it’s a fair point for her to bring up,” Bingel said. “Clearly the Texas and Ohio votes are critical for Senator Clinton to stay in this race, and she’s taking it to the max.” Dan Palazzolo, political science professor at the University of Richmond, said the Clinton spot taps into a clear “fear factor,” but doesn’t rise to the level of the Daisy ad. He said it will only be effective for Clinton if she repeats the ad’s theme on the stump leading up to the March 4 vote. “She’s gotta stick with it. She can’t just keep jumping around,” Palazzolo said. “This could be their last card that they’re playing.” In a statement the Clinton campaign released about the ad Friday, retired Gen. Wesley Clark said: “One of the most important duties of the president is ensuring the safety of the American people. Inevitably, another national security crisis will occur. And when it does, voters shouldn’t have to wonder whether their president will be ready. As president, Hillary will be ready to act swiftly and decisively.” Keywords: Hillary Clinton, negative ad, attack, Barack Obama, national security, Children, Gulf, Answering the Phone, TV spot, fear-mongering, campaign
  • 8 Feb 2010
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1:54
*** UPDATE *** The Obama campaign sends along this response: “Everything in those mailers is completely accurate, unlike the discredited attacks from Hillary Clinton’s negative campaign that have been rejected in South Carolina, Wisconsin, and across America. We look forward to having a debate this Tuesday on the facts, and the facts are that Senator Clinton was a supporter of NAFTA and the China permanent trade treaties until this campaign began. And she herself has said that under the Clinton health care plan, she would consider ‘going after the wages’ of Americans who don't purchase health insurance, whether they can afford it or not.” After the talk, she continued to take the fight to Obama while talking to reporters, displaying two of Obama's direct mail attack pieces, which she called “blatantly false” and claimed that his rhetoric doesn’t match reality. "Let's have a real campaign,” she said, her anger palpable. “Enough with the speeches and the big rallies... Shame on you Barack Obama... Meet me in Ohio. Let's have a debate about your tactics and your behavior in this campaign.” A supporter had showed Clinton the mailers in the rope line earlier at the event. One mailer is about NAFTA, and uses a Newsday quote saying Clinton says it was a "boon" to our economy. She claims never to have said that and that Newsday printed a correction. The second mailer is about health care and says her plan would force people to buy policies they cannot afford. It is the one that resembles the Republican Harry and Louise ad. Clinton also fielded questions about her campaign's spending habits, saying that the money goes directly to communicating with voters, and defended her position on NAFTA, saying she was not in the Senate to vote for it and has criticized it since she entered the Senate. When asked about the fact that NAFTA was enacted when her husband was in office, she said it was negotiated by the first President Bush. The Clinton campaign also held a conference call to criticize the Obama mailers with Ohio Gov. Ted Strickland, a Clinton supporter, and Wolfson. "Quite frankly Sen. Obama is sending out information in the mail in Ohio that is apparently quite false in some of its claims regarding Sen. Clinton and NAFTA," Strickland said. Wolfson followed up with some past pro-NAFTA statements made by Obama, one apparently in Illinois to a group of farmers. Wolfson said there is a "pattern" of Obama saying different things to different groups. Clinton also began a town hall meeting here last night by acknowledging the Dallas police officer who died after an accident while driving in her motorcade this morning. She then tied the plight of the officer’s family to that of other families struggling in America today. Keywords: Hillary Clinton Barack Obama mailers NAFTA blatantly false Ohio Texas primary caucus pledged delegates superdelegates
  • 23 Feb 2008
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2:29
Hillary puts her faith in Texas and Ohio to retain hope of nomination By Leonard Doyle Thursday, 14 February 2008 As news of her defeats in Virginia, Maryland and Washington DC sank in, Mrs Clinton was as far away as possible, courting Hispanic voters in El Paso, Texas. She did not mention Tuesday's defeat, even as the wheels started coming off her campaign. Mrs Clinton's deputy campaign manager Mike Henry, who ran her field operations, quit in an internal power struggle. But by yesterday morning, her campaign was on the offensive, demanding Barack Obama engage in more televised debates and accusing him of misrepresenting her positions. Part of Mrs Clinton's strategy is to build a "firewall" in the Ohio and Texas primaries on 4 March, to hold back the prairie fire of enthusiasm driving Mr Obama forward. But staking everything on one or two important races is a very high-risk strategy, one which failed Rudy Giuliani in Florida, forcing him out of the Republican race. In her desperate attempt to wrest the Democratic ticket for the White House from Mr Obama, well-heeled backers of Mrs Clinton are now expected to turn to the dark arts of the political playbook, including discrediting her opponent. It would be a role reversal for Mrs Clinton who once complained that there was "a vast right-wing conspiracy" out to get her. But if the fight turns ugly, Mrs Clinton could end up wrecking both her and Mr Obama's chances of winning the White House in November. The Clinton campaign has already suffered badly by trying to raise the issue of Mr Obama's use of cocaine as a youth and then attempting to use the race card against him before and during the South Carolina primary. But more is now expected and the Obama campaign has said all along that there will be a lot of turbulence before it clinches the nomination. Mrs Clinton's latest strategy could be to discreetly encourage independent organisations to fight on her behalf – a variation of the "Swift Boat" campaign that helped destroy John Kerry and win George Bush a second term in 2004. Some of her wealthiest backers are drawing up plans to skirt around election laws and run their own independent advertising campaigns attacking Mr Obama ahead of the primary battles in Ohio, Texas and elsewhere. Susie Tompkins Buell, the founder of the Esprit clothing company, is considering paying for advertisements that would deliver a harder punch than the bland, uplifting advertisements the Clinton campaign is running. "We're just trying to figure out things to do to help," Ms. Buell told The Wall Street Journal. "We all feel very passionate about it, so the question is, what is the best thing we can do to get her across the finish line?" Mrs Clinton and her staff are forbidden by law from talking to anyone running an independent campaign on her behalf. But in an extended television interview on the eve of her defeat in the "Potomac Primaries" she did the spadework for anyone contemplating running "attack ads" on her behalf. "We still don't have a lot of answers about Senator Obama and his dealings with Mr [Tony] Rezko," she said referring to a former political backer who is facing trial on federal corruption charges. The danger for Mrs Clinton is that attack ads by independent organisations could backfire. Mr Kerry has already warned against the sort of tactics employed by the "Swift Boat Veterans for Truth" group that questioned his record in Vietnam. Hillary Clinton greets supporters during a Solutions for America rally at Saint Mary's University, San Antonio, Texas Keywords: Hillary Clinton, Ohio, Texas, Solutions for America, workers, jobs, unions, foreclosures, NAFTA, trade, Barack Obama, overseas, debate
  • 9 Jun 2011
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0:46
The Path to The Nomination By Mark Penn, Chief Strategist Hillary Clinton Date: Wednesday, February 13, 2008 This election will come down to delegates. Votes are still being counted and delegates apportioned, but Hillary Clinton and Barack Obama are separated by approximately 40 delegates right now – that is, barely 1% of all the delegates to the Democratic convention. Change Begins March 4th. Hillary leads in the three largest, delegate rich states remaining: Texas, Ohio and Pennsylvania. These three states have 492 delegates – 64 percent of the remaining delegates Hillary Clinton needs to win the nomination. According to the latest polls, Hillary leads in Texas (IVR Jan 30-31), Pennsylvania (Franklin & Marshall Jan 8-14) and Ohio (Columbus Dispatch Jan 23-31). After March 4th, over 3000 delegates will be committed, and we project that Hillary Clinton and Barack Obama will be virtually tied with 611 delegates still to be chosen in Pennsylvania and other remaining states. This does not even include Florida and Michigan (where Hillary won 178 delegates), whose votes we believe should be counted. The reason Hillary is so strong in Ohio, Texas and Pennsylvania is that her message of delivering solutions resonates strongly with voters in those states. Hillary is the only candidate who can deliver the economic change voters want – the only candidate with a real plan and a record of fighting for health care, housing, job creation and protecting Social Security. The demographics in these states also favor Hillary Clinton. Hillary won among white women by 6 points in Virginia and 18 points in Maryland, and white women make up a much bigger share of the electorate in these states (41% of 2004 Ohio Democratic primary voters, for instance, compared with only 33-35% of 2008 Maryland and Virginia Democratic primary voters). Hillary has also won large majorities among Latinos nationwide – 73% in New York, 67% in California, 68% in New Jersey, 62% in New Mexico, 59% in Florida and 55% in Arizona. Latinos made up 24% of Texas Democratic primary voters in 2004, and may be an even larger share in 2008. Hillary Clinton has shown that she has the ability and organization to compete financially and on the ground. She raised 10 million dollars in just three days last week, and will be competitive with Barack Obama in fundraising and TV advertising from now through March 4th and beyond. She has a strong organization in each of these key states and endorsements from Governor Strickland, Rep. Stephanie Tubbs Jones, and former Senator John Glenn in Ohio. Hillary had a huge 12,000 person rally in El Paso last night to kick off her Texas campaign. Again and again, this race has shown that it is voters and delegates who matter, not the pundits or perceived “momentum.” After Iowa, every poll gave Barack Obama a strong lead in New Hampshire, but he ended up losing the state. And after a defeat in South Carolina, Hillary Clinton went on to win by large margins in California, New York, Florida, New Jersey, Massachusetts, Arizona, Tennessee, Oklahoma and Arkansas. As history shows, the Democratic nomination goes to the candidate who wins the most delegates – not the candidate who wins the most states. In 1992, Bill Clinton lost a string of primaries before clinching the nomination. He ceded Iowa, New Hampshire, Massachusetts, Maryland, Arizona, Washington, Utah, Colorado, Rhode Island, Connecticut, Delaware, Vermont and South Dakota. And in 1976, Jimmy Carter lost twenty-three states before winning the nomination, including: Massachusetts, New York, New Jersey, Maryland, West Virginia, South Carolina, Alabama, Illinois, Mississippi, Minnesota, North Dakota, Nebraska, Wyoming, Montana, Idaho, Washington, Oregon, Nevada, California, Arizona, Alaska, Hawaii, and Utah. Keywords: Hillary Clinton, Barack Obama, lead, win, pledged delegates, superdelegates, OH, TX, primaries, Democratic Convention, Mark Penn
  • 14 Feb 2008
  • 543
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2:14
Clinton Remained Silent As Wal-Mart Fought Unions Tapes Reviewed by ABC News Show Clinton As a Loyal Company Woman By BRIAN ROSS, MADDY SAUER and RHONDA SCHWARTZ Jan. 31, 2008— In six years as a member of the Wal-Mart board of directors, between 1986 and 1992, Hillary Clinton remained silent as the world's largest retailer waged a major campaign against labor unions seeking to represent store workers. Clinton has been endorsed for president by more than a dozen unions, according to her campaign Web site, which omits any reference to her role at Wal-Mart in its detailed biography of her. Wal-Mart's anti-union efforts were headed by one of Clinton's fellow board members, John Tate, a Wal-Mart executive vice president who also served on the board with Clinton for four of her six years. Tate was fond of repeating, as he did at a managers meeting in 2004 after his retirement, what he said was his favorite phrase, "Labor unions are nothing but blood-sucking parasites living off the productive labor of people who work for a living." Wal-Mart says Tate's comments "were his own and do not reflect Wal-Mart's views." But Wal-Mart founder Sam Walton and other company officials often recounted how they relied on Tate to lead the company's successful anti-union efforts. An ABC News analysis of the videotapes of at least four stockholder meetings where Clinton appeared shows she never once rose to defend the role of American labor unions. The tapes, broadcast this morning on "Good Morning America," were provided to ABC News from the archives of Flagler Productions, a Lenexa, Kan., company hired by Wal-Mart to record its meetings and events. A former board member told ABCNews**** that he had no recollection of Clinton defending unions during more than 20 board meetings held in private. The tapes show Clinton in the role of a loyal company woman. "I'm always proud of Wal-Mart and what we do and the way we do it better than anybody else," she said at a June 1990 stockholders meeting. Clinton would not agree to be interviewed on the subject but now says she no longer shares Wal-Mart's values and believes unions "have been essential to our nation's success." The videotapes do show that Clinton used her role to push for more environmentally friendly policies and better treatment of women. "We've got a very strong-willed young woman on our board now; her name is Hillary," said Wal-Mart founder Sam Walton at a 1987 stockholders meeting in describing Clinton's role in pushing for more women to be hired in management positions. Critics say Clinton's efforts produced few tangible results, and Wal-Mart is now defending itself in a lawsuit brought by 16 current and former female employees. "I don't doubt the sincerity of her efforts, but we don't see much evidence that conditions for women at Wal-Mart changed much during the late 1980s and early 1990s," said Joe Sellers, one of the lawyers suing Wal-Mart on behalf of the women. Wal-Mart declined to comment to ABC News about the lawsuit, but the company has said previously that it is confident it did not discriminate against female employees. According to the New York Times, Sen. Clinton "maintains close ties to Wal-Mart executives through the Democratic Party and the tightly knit Arkansas business community." The May 20, 2007 article also reported that her husband, former President Clinton, "speaks frequently to Wal-Mart's current chief executive, H. Lee Scott Jr." and held a private dinner at the Clinton's New York home in July 2006 for him. He did not directly respond when asked why she did not quit the board over the conpany's anti-union efforts. "Wal-Mart was Arkansas's largest employer when Sam Walton asked Sen. Clinton to join the board," he said. "As the first woman to join Wal-Mart's board, she worked hard to make it a better corporate citizen." In its statement, Wal-Mart described Sen. Clinton as "a valuable contributor" who "pushed us to be a better company." WI, Wisconsin, Hillary Clinton fights, Barack Obama, workers, unions, American jobs, overseas, foreclosures, NAFTA, trade agreements, corporate lawyer
  • 14 Feb 2008
  • 834
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3:47
Analysis: Barack Obama has advantage over Hillary Clinton in head-to-head with John McCain Sen. John McCain became the likely Republican nominee after Mitt Romney decided to suspend his campaign Thursday. Now, the Democrats are debating who would do better against the Arizona Republican. Two polls this month have asked registered voters nationwide how they would vote if the choice were between McCain and Democratic Sen. Hillary Clinton. A CNN poll, conducted by the Opinion Research Corporation February 1-3, shows Clinton three points ahead of McCain, 50 percent to 47 percent. That's within the poll's margin of error of 3 percentage points, meaning that the race is statistically tied.. A Time magazine poll, conducted February 1-4, also shows a dead heat between Clinton and McCain. Each was backed by 46 percent of those polled. In the CNN poll, Obama leads McCain by 8 points, 52 percent to 44 percent. That's outside the margin of error, meaning that Obama has the lead. And in the Time poll, Obama leads McCain by 7 points, 48 percent to 41 percent -- a lead also outside of the poll's margin of error of 3 percentage points. In both polls, Obama looks stronger than Clinton. Why? Obama's explanation: "I think there is no doubt that she has higher negatives than any of the remaining Democratic candidates. That's just a fact, and there are some who will not vote for her." That was three weeks ago. Now, only two Democratic candidates remain. Clinton does have higher negatives than Obama -- and McCain. Forty-four percent of the public say they don't like Clinton, compared with 36 percent who don't like McCain and 31 percent who don't like Obama, according to the CNN poll conducted February 1-3. Why does Obama do better against McCain than Clinton? Obama does do a little better than Clinton with independents and Republicans. But the big difference is men: Men give McCain an 18-point lead over Clinton, 57 percent to 39 percent, according to the CNN poll. But if McCain and Obama went head to head, McCain's lead among men shrinks to three, 49 percent to 46 percent -- statistically a tie. Women, on the other hand, vote for either Clinton or Obama by similar margins. Some Democrats may be worried about how Obama will fare with white voters. Whites give McCain a 15-point lead over Clinton, (56 percent for McCain, 41 percent for Clinton). But Obama actually fares better than Clinton with white voters. McCain still leads, but by a smaller margin, (52 to 43 percent). Obama argues that he can reach across party lines. And he does do a little better than Clinton with Independents and Republicans, at least in these polls. But the big difference is that Clinton doesn't draw very well with men. Obama does. Keywords: Hillary Clinton, loses, presidential election, John McCain, Barack Obama, beats, wins, head-to-head, Democratic candidate, November, Mark Penn Poll Date Sample McCain (R) Obama (D) Spread RCP Average 01/29 to 02/10 - 43.7% 47.4% Obama +3.7% AP-Ipsos 02/07 - 02/10 1,029 A 42% 48% Obama +6% USA Today/Gallup 02/08 - 02/09 1016 A 46% 50% Obama +4% Time 02/01 - 02/04 958 LV 41% 48% Obama +7% CNN 02/01 - 02/03 974 RV 44% 52% Obama +8% Cook/RT Strategies 01/31 - 02/02 855 RV 43% 45% Obama +2% ABC/Wash Post 01/30 - 02/01 1249 A 46% 49% Obama +3% FOX News 01/30 - 01/31 900 RV 43% 44% Obama +1% NPR 01/29 - 01/31 1000 LV 48% 47% McCain +1% Rasmussen (Mon) 4 Day Tracking 1700 LV 40% 44% Obama +4% --- Poll Date Sample McCain (R) Clinton (D) Spread RCP Average 01/29 to 02/10 - 46.6% 45.4% McCain +1.2% AP-Ipsos 02/07 - 02/10 1,029 A 45% 46% Clinton +1% USA Today/Gallup 02/08 - 02/09 1016 A 49% 48% McCain +1% Time 02/01 - 02/04 958 LV 46% 46% Tie CNN 02/01 - 02/03 974 RV 47% 50% Clinton +3% Cook/RT Strategies 01/31 - 02/02 855 RV 45% 41% McCain +4% ABC/Wash Post 01/30 - 02/01 1249 A 49% 46% McCain +3% FOX News 01/30 - 01/31 900 RV 45% 44% McCain +1% NPR 01/29 - 01/31 1000 LV 48% 45% McCain +3% Rasmussen (Mon) 4 Day Tracking 1700 LV 45% 43% McCain +2%
  • 12 Feb 2008
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8:23
How to decorate sugar cookies with rolled fondant for Valentine's Day or any holiday. Very easy and very cute!
  • 12 Feb 2008
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3:29
Hillary Clinton's George Bush Connection In the Clintons' pursuit of power, there is no such thing as a strange bedfellow. One recently exposed inamorata was Norman Hsu, the mysterious businessman from Hong Kong who brought in $850,000 to Hillary Clinton's campaign before being unmasked as a fugitive. Her campaign dismissed Hsu as someone who'd slipped through the cracks of an otherwise unimpeachable system for vetting donors, and perhaps he was. The same cannot be said for the notorious financier Alan Quasha, whose involvement with Clinton is at least as substantial--and still under wraps. Political junkies will recall Quasha as the controversial figure who bailed out George W. Bush's failing oil company in 1986, folding Bush into his company, Harken Energy, thus setting him on the path to a lucrative and high-profile position as an owner of the Texas Rangers baseball team, and the presidency. The persistently unprofitable Harken--many of whose board members, connected to powerful foreign interests and the intelligence community, nevertheless profited enormously--faced intense scrutiny in the early 1990s and again during Bush's first term. Now Quasha is back--on the other side of the aisle. Operating below the radar, he entered Hillary Clinton's circle even before she declared her candidacy by quietly arranging for the hire of Clinton confidant and longtime Democratic Party money man Terry McAuliffe at one of his companies. During the interregnum between McAuliffe's chairmanship of the Democratic Party and the time he officially joined Clinton's campaign, Quasha's firm set McAuliffe up with a salary and opened a Washington office for him. Just a few years earlier, McAuliffe had publicly criticized Bush for his financial dealings with Harken, disparaging the company's Enron-like accounting. Yet in 2005 McAuliffe accepted this cushy perch with Quasha's newly acquired investment firm, Carret Asset Management, and even brought along former Clinton White House business liaison Peter O'Keefe, who had been his senior aide at the Democratic National Committee. McAuliffe remained with the company until he became national chair of Hillary's presidential bid, and O'Keefe never left. McAuliffe's connection to Quasha has, until now, never been noted. Another strong link between Quasha and Clinton is Quasha's business partner, Hassan Nemazee, a top Hillary fundraiser who was trotted out to defend her during the Hsu episode--in which the clothing manufacturer was unmasked as a swindler who seemingly funneled illegal contributions through "donors" of modest means. In June, by liquidating a blind trust, the Clintons sought to distance themselves from any financial entanglements that might embarrass the campaign. Clinton spokesman Howard Wolfson argued that the couple had gone "above and beyond" what was legally required "in order to avoid even the hint of a conflict of interest." But throughout their political careers, Bill and Hillary Clinton have repeatedly associated with people whose objectives seemed a million miles from "a place called Hope." Among these Alan Quasha and his menagerie--including Saudi frontmen, a foreign dictator, figures with intelligence ties and a maze of companies and offshore funds--stand out. "That Hillary Clinton's campaign is involved with this particular cast of characters should give people pause," says John Moscow, a former Manhattan prosecutor. In the late 1980s and early '90s he led the investigation of the corrupt Bank of Credit and Commerce International (BCCI) global financial empire--a bank whose prominent shareholders included members of the Harken board. "Too many of the same names from earlier troubling circumstances suggests a lack of control over who she is dealing with," says Moscow, "or a policy of dealing with anyone who can pay." Keywords: Hillary Clinton, loses, pledged delegates, superdelegates, Barack Obama, wins, Bill Clinton, ME, VA, Washington DC, MD, WA, LA, NE, Demcratic Convention
  • 12 Feb 2008
  • 697
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1:55
Alisa 'Starr' Ballard - Inside of You Lyrics: The biggest part of life, is giving back some of the blessings that were given unto you Through all of the lessons learn, this is the one That makes my heart feel the most joy because it's true Cause there's nothing like, the power of God, Inside of you Inside of you Just like seasons change, we do too, to try to make a better world to be part of Although it may seem hard, at times to do Just know that God is always there to guide you through Cause there's nothing like the power of God, Inside of you Make a joyful noise, great unto the Lord Let your light so shine for those who have no faith in you Move with grace and love, be steadfast and strong Soon they too will seek the God in them, they see in you Make a joyful noise, great unto the Lord Let your light so shine for those who have no faith in you Move with grace and love, be steadfast and strong And they too will seek the God in them they see in you Cause there's nothing like the power of God, Inside of you Political campaigns play to their strengths, and one realm where Sen. Barack Obama has excelled is the ground game. When the campaign began one year ago, Obama was far less known nationally than his principal rivals, Sen. Hillary Rodham Clinton (D-N.Y.) and former vice presidential candidate John Edwards (D-N.C.). Since then, the freshman senator from Illinois has benefited enormously from the work of legions of grass-roots organizers who are giving, heart and soul, to his White House bid. Obama's successes in the early primaries owe much to the tactics and initiative of young field organizers in places like Estill, S.C., Elko, Nev., and Waterloo, Iowa. Looking ahead to Super Tuesday, where voters in 22 states will choose Democratic delegates, the Obama campaign is again counting on a superior ground game to peel away delegates in very competitive districts. More than 500 paid staffers have been deployed to the Feb. 5 states, Obama campaign manager David Plouffe reported in a conference call with reporters today. He said the campaign has what it calls 75,000 "active volunteers" making telephone calls, knocking on doors and otherwise helping out. To show what a difference the organization can make, Plouffe pointed to Saturday's South Carolina primary, where Obama won 44 of 46 counties and more than doubled Clinton's vote totals amid record turnout. He said 13,000 volunteers reported for duty on Election Day. That works out to one volunteer for every 23 voters who cast a ballot for Obama. "This is a place," Plouffe told reporters, referring to the ground game, "where I think we have a dominant advantage." With vast territory to work and only seven days left, strategists for the surviving candidates are racing to decide how to apportion the campaign's money and time, not to mention the energy of the candidates and their surrogates. Plouffe said the Obama camp is now running radio or television ads in all 22 Feb. 5 states, except Illinois, where a recent poll shows Obama leading Clinton by a 2 to 1 margin. Although polls show Obama trailing in some of the biggest Feb. 5 states, Plouffe said the Obama campaign has raised $5 million online since the South Carolina polls closed. The campaign says it has registered more than 600,000 donors so far, with fewer than 3 percent having contributed the maximum allowable amount. Surrogates are on the air for Obama in their own states, including Sen. Claire McCaskill in Missouri, Sen. Kent Conrad in North Dakota and Gov. Janet Napolitano in Arizona. Advertisements with other prominent supporters are in the works, Plouffe said. An example of Obama's unorthodox decision to deploy organizers to unlikely states is Kansas, where he visited his grandparents' home town of El Dorado today and picked up the endorsement of Gov. Kathleen Sebelius, a popular two-term governor known for working with Republicans -- at least the ones she was unable to persuade to switch parties. Lt. Gov. Mark Parkinson, now a Democrat, is a former chairman of the Kansas Republican Party. Keywords: Super Tuesday Barack Obama Campaign Theme Song Supporters Inspiration Music Video Tsunami Duper Presidential
  • 31 Jan 2008
  • 441
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2:32
Barack Obama Presidential Campaign Theme Song Music Video Alisa 'Starr' Ballard - Inside of You Lyrics: The biggest part of life, is giving back some of the blessings that were given unto you Through all of the lessons learn, this is the one That makes my heart feel the most joy because it's true Cause there's nothing like, the power of God, Inside of you Inside of you Just like seasons change, we do too, to try to make a better world to be part of Although it may seem hard, at times to do Just know that God is always there to guide you through Cause there's nothing like the power of God, Inside of you Make a joyful noise, great unto the Lord Let your light so shine for those who have no faith in you Move with grace and love, be steadfast and strong Soon they too will seek the God in them, they see in you Make a joyful noise, great unto the Lord Let your light so shine for those who have no faith in you Move with grace and love, be steadfast and strong And they too will seek the God in them they see in you Cause there's nothing like the power of God, Inside of you Alisa "Starr" Ballard Singer/Songwriter Keywords: Barack Obama Presidential Campaign Theme Song Music Video Hllary Clinton wins Florida primary delegates Democratic Party Barack Obama's campaign is encouraging the national media not to fall for a Clinton campaign declaration of victory in Florida's Primary election today, because the state cannot award delegates to the Democratic Party's national nominating convention. Florida and Michigan both were penalized after scheduling early votes without national party approval. "The Clinton campaign had a (media conference) call that Flkorida should be covered by all you folks in a serious fashion," said Sen. John Kerry, D-MA, and an Obama supporter. "What this race is about right now is delegates. The bottom line is that Florida does not offer any delegates. It should not be a spin race, a fabricated race." Kerry said Florida is a state where Obama, former Sen. John Edwards of North Carolina, and Sen. Hillary Clinton, D-NY, signed pledges not to campaign after the Democratic National Committee stripped it of delegates for moving its primary date up without national party approval. Yet Clinton campaign allies, notably the AFSCME labor union has been "spending tons of money" there, Kerry said, to create a symbolic Clinton victory before Feb. 5 elections in 22 states. Moreover, Hillary Clinton will be in Florida tonight, to thank supporters after today's votes are tallied. While the Clinton campaign may not win any delegates, it no doubt seeks to project a media image of restored momentum after losing to Obama by a two-to-one margin in South Carolina on Saturday. "We think it is a very political move and voters will see it as too cute by half," said Obama Campaign Manager David Plouffe, who also noted that his main opponent, Hillary Clinton, appears to be changing her position on whether Michigan's delegates ought to be seated at the Democratic Convention. The campaign officials also said Obama was well-organized in the 22 states voting a week from today with 500 staffers and 75,000 active volunteers. He said the campaign has raised $5 million online since winning Saturday's South Carolina Primary. He said the campaign had 13,000 volunteers in that state, a figure slightly less than what the campaign said last weekend.
  • 30 Jan 2008
  • 6 018
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2:19
Obama wins most SC delegates By The Associated Press 1 hour, 35 minutes ago Sen. Barack Obama won 25 delegates in South Carolina's Democratic primary, narrowing Sen. Hillary Rodham Clinton's lead in the race for the nomination. ADVERTISEMENT Clinton won 12 delegates and former Sen. John Edwards won eight. All of the South Carolina delegates have been awarded. Obama has won the most delegates at stake in the primaries and caucuses held so far. But Clinton leads the overall race for the nomination because she has the support of more superdelegates, a group of about 800 party and elected officials who automatically get to attend the national convention this summer. Superdelegates are free to support whomever they choose, regardless of what happens in the primaries. Most superdelegates remain undecided. But among those who have endorsed a candidate, Clinton has the lead. In the overall race for the nomination, Clinton has 249 delegates, followed by Obama with 167 delegates and Edwards with 58. A total of 2,025 delegates are needed to secure the Democratic nomination. The Republican primary in South Carolina was a week ago, and Sen. John McCain won the most delegates to the Republican National Convention. Overall, former Massachusetts Gov. Mitt Romney leads the race for GOP delegates with 59, followed by former Arkansas Gov. Mike Huckabee with 40, and McCain with 36. A total of 1,191 delegates are needed to secure the Republican nomination. The Associated Press tracks the delegate races by projecting the number of national convention delegates won by candidates in each presidential primary or caucus, based on state and national party rules, and by interviewing unpledged delegates to obtain their preferences. In some states, such as Iowa and Nevada, local precinct caucuses are the first stage in the allocation process. The AP uses preferences expressed in those caucuses to project the number of national convention delegates each candidate will have when they are chosen at county, congressional district or state conventions. Keywords: Barack Obama, wins, South Carolina, SC, leads nationally in elected pledged delegates over Hillary Clinton 63-48, super, primary, Democratic Convention
  • 2 Dec 2009
  • 2 139
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3:27
Barack Obama on some Issues concerning Women Preventing Unwanted Pregnancy: Barack Obama is an original co-sponsor of legislation to expand access to contraception, health information and preventive services to help reduce unintended pregnancies. Introduced in January 2007, the Prevention First Act will increase funding for family planning and comprehensive sex education that teaches both abstinence and safe sex methods. The Act will also end insurance discrimination against contraception, improve awareness about emergency contraception, and provide compassionate assistance to rape victims. Supports a Woman’s Right to Choose: Barack Obama understands that abortion is a divisive issue, and respects those who disagree with him. However, he has been a consistent champion of reproductive choice and will make preserving women’s rights under Roe v. Wade a priority as President. He opposes any constitutional amendment to overturn the Supreme Court's decision in that case. PREVENTING VIOLENCE AGAINST WOMEN Reducing Domestic Violence: One in four women will experience domestic violence in her lifetime. Family violence accounted for 11 percent of all violence between 1998 and 2002. Barack Obama introduced legislation to combat domestic violence by providing $25 million a year for partnerships between domestic violence prevention organizations and Fatherhood or Marriage programs to train staff in domestic violence services, provide services to families affected by domestic violence, and to develop best practices in domestic violence prevention. Strengthening Domestic Violence Laws: Approximately 1,400 women a year – four every day – die in the United States as a result of domestic violence. And 132,000 women report that they have been victims of a rape or attempted rape, and it is estimated that an even greater number have been raped, but do not report it. Senator Obama co-sponsored and helped reauthorize the Violence Against Women Act. Signed into law in January 2006, the bill funds and helps communities, nonprofit organizations, and police combat domestic violence, sexual assault, and stalking. The legislation establishes a sexual assault services program and provides education grants to prevent domestic violence. Fighting Gender Violence Abroad: The genocide in Darfur has had particularly devastating consequences for women. Tens of thousands of women have been killed, raped, and displaced since the conflict began in 2003. Barack Obama has been a leading voice in Washington urging the end of genocide in Sudan. He worked with Senator Sam Brownback (R-KS) on the Darfur Peace and Accountability Act, a version of which was signed into law. Obama has traveled to the United Nations to meet with Sudanese officials and visited refugee camps on the Chad-Sudan border to raise international awareness of the ongoing humanitarian disaster there. He also worked with Senator Harry Reid (D-NV) to secure $20 million for the African Union peacekeeping mission. Keywords: Barack Obama, wins, SC, South Carolina, primary, victory, speech, Democratic women, women's rights, female, voters, Hillary Clinton
  • 8 Apr 2009
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1:54
Trying to Heal a Rift in New Hampshire By Alec MacGillis *******blog.washingtonpost****/the-trail/2008/01/18/trying_to_heal_a_rift_in_new_h_1.html Three New Hampshire Democratic leaders who signed a letter two days before the state's primary at the request of Hillary Clinton's campaign, attacking Barack Obama as soft in his support for abortion rights, are asking Obama supporters in the state to put the rifts of the primary campaign behind them and praising Obama for being "strongly pro-choice." Of the two dozen prominent women who signed the critical letter, e-mailed by the Clinton campaign to a list of supporters and undecided voters, three have now signed their names to another missive asking abortion rights supporters in the state to come together and take comfort in the fact that all of the Democratic presidential candidates are firmly pro-choice. One of the three Clinton supporters went even further, saying in an interview Thursday that signing the letter attacking Obama was a "mistake." Katie Wheeler, a former state senator, said the Clinton campaign had not given her background information about Obama's record on abortion rights when it asked her to sign the letter calling him weak on the issue, and said that, as a result, she did not understand the context of the votes that the letter was attacking him over. "It should never have gotten to the point where anyone thought Obama was not pro-choice," said Wheeler, a founder of the New Hampshire chapter of NARAL Pro-Choice America. "I don't think the Clinton campaign should have done that. It was divisive and unnecessary...I think it was a mistake and I've spoken to the national [Clinton campaign] and told them it caused problems in New Hampshire, and am hoping they won't do it again." The new letter and comments by Wheeler are the latest twist in a back-and-forth that Obama supporters believe did real damage to his campaign in the final days in New Hampshire, though Wheeler said she doubted that the e-mail had that much impact in the final day of the race. "I don't think this one thing would sway people," she said. Nonetheless, the conflict over Obama's "present" -- rather than "yes" or "no" -- votes on abortion bills in the Illinois legislature has left behind such deep divisions among the state's Democrats that some Obama supporters vowed, in the wake of her come-from-behind N.H. win, not to vote for Clinton, should she become the party's nominee. The e-mail arrived in selected New Hampshire in-boxes shortly after a postcard from the Clinton campaign that attacked Obama for being "unwilling to take a stand for choice" was mailed to homes. "The difference between Hillary's repeatedly standing up strong on choice and Obama's unwillingness to vote 'yes' or 'no' is a clear contrast, and we believe the voters in New Hampshire deserve to know this difference," the e-mail stated. "We support Hillary Clinton because she never ducked when choice was at stake." One of the Obama supporters who signed the reconciliation e-mail, Mary Rauh, said she did so because she was very worried that the rift created by the primary could seriously harm abortion rights efforts in the state if it was left unadressed. But she said that she remained aggrieved by the Clinton attack and by the willingness of so many Democratic leaders in the state to go along with it, and worried by reports that similar e-mails attacking Obama on abortion rights have gone out in other states preparing to vote. "We still have battles to fight in New Hampshire and we can't let dirty politics destroy the choice voice here. It's too important," Rauh said. "But for Clinton to do this to the choice community is so appalling. I can't tell you how it distresses me ... how devastating this and how horrified I am that the Clinton campaign would do this. I fear it will happen elsewhere and it's just appalling." Former President of Chicago NOW, Lorna Brett Howard, tells the story of why she switched from supporting Hillary Clinton to supporting Barack Obama.
  • 24 Jan 2008
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IS TRINITY A RACIST AFRICAN AMERICAN CHURCH OR A "WARM AND ACCEPTING" CHURCH COMMUNITY WHERE ALL RACES ARE "ENTHUSIASTICALLY WELCOMED" Congregants Said Trinity Was "A Warm and Accepting Community." The New York Times reported, "On blogs and cable news shows, conservative critics have called it separatist and antiwhite. Congregants respond by saying critics are misreading the church's tenets, that it is a warm and accepting community and is not hostile to whites." [New York Times, 4/30/07] Religion Historian: At Trinity, "My Wife And I On Occasion Attend, And, Like All Other Non-Blacks, Are Enthusiastically Welcomed." University of Chicago's Martin Marty, a historian of modern Christianity. wrote, "Trinity is the largest congregation in the whole United Church of Christ, the ex-Congregational (think Jonathan Edwards) and Reformed (think Reinhold Niebuhr) mainline church body. Trinity's rubric is "Unashamedly Black and Unapologetically Christian." So far as I can tell Trinity shapes a kind of ellipse around these two "centers," neither of which makes sense without the other. This you would never know from the slanders of its enemies or the incomprehension and naiveté of some reporters who lack background in the civil rights and African-American movements of several decades ago — a background out of which Trinity's stirrings first rose and on which it transformatively trades...More important, for Trinity, being 'unashamedly black' does not mean being 'anti-white. My wife and I on occasion attend, and, like all other non-blacks, are enthusiastically welcomed." [Martin Marty, 4/2/07] Keywords: Barack Obama, Racist, Black, African American, Trinity United Church of Christ, Chicago, Religion, Christian, Faith, Race, Africa TRINITY TENETS ARE "TAKEN DIRECTLY FROM SCRIPTURE" AND EMPHASIZE "COMMITMENT" TO GOD, COMMUNITY, FAMILY, WORK, SELF-DISCIPLINE AND SELF-RESPECT Obama Says Black Values System Must Be Understood as a Whole. "Obama said it was important to understand the document as a whole rather than highlight individual tenets. 'Commitment to God, black community, commitment to the black family, the black work ethic, self-discipline and self-respect,' he said. 'Those are values that the conservative movement in particular has suggested are necessary for black advancement...So I would be puzzled that they would object or quibble with the bulk of a document that basically espouses profoundly conservative values of self-reliance and self-help.'" [Chicago Tribune, 2/6/07] Obama Says Argument Against "Middleclassness" Taken Directly From Scripture. "In his published memoirs, Obama said even he was stopped by Trinity's tenet to disavow "middleclassness" when he first read it two decades ago in a church pamphlet. The brochure implored upwardly mobile church members not to distance themselves from less fortunate Trinity worshipers. 'As I read it, at least, it was a very simple argument taken directly from Scripture: 'To whom much is given much is required,'' Obama said. [Chicago Tribune, 2/6/07]
  • 28 Jan 2008
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Is Barack Hussein Obama a Muslim? BARACK OBAMA IS NOT AND HAS NEVER BEEN A MUSLIM Los Angeles Times: The Rumors About Obama Are "False And Vile." The Los Angeles Times wrote in an editorial, "That the rumors are false and vile is self-evident...Presidential candidates of both parties have a duty to denounce not only the smear against Obama but the bigotry that underlies it." [Los Angeles Times, 12/3/07] Keywords: Barack Hussein Obama, Muslim, Christian, Islam, Wahabbist, Wahabbism, extremist, madrassa, religion, Trinity United Church of Christ Obama Spokesman Robert Gibbs Issued A Statement Explaining That "Senator Obama Has Never Been A Muslim, Was Not Raised As A Muslim, And Is A Committed Christian." "Obama's campaign aides have emphasized his strong Christian beliefs and downplayed any Islamic connection. The Illinois senator was raised 'in a secular household in Indonesia by his stepfather and mother,’ his chief spokesman, Robert Gibbs, said in a statement in January after false reports began circulating that Obama had attended a radical madrasa, or Koranic school, as a child. 'To be clear, Senator Obama has never been a Muslim, was not raised a Muslim, and is a committed Christian who attends the United Church of Christ in Chicago,’ Gibbs' Jan. 24 statement said." [Los Angeles Times, 3/16/07] Obama "Beckoning" Felt At Trinity United Church Of Christ, "Submitted Myself To His Will, And Dedicated Myself To Discovering His Truth And Carrying Out His Works." Obama said, "So one Sunday, I put on one of the few clean jackets I had, and went over to Trinity United Church of Christ on 95th Street on the South Side of Chicago. And I heard Reverend Jeremiah A. Wright deliver a sermon called "The Audacity of Hope." And during the course of that sermon, he introduced me to someone named Jesus Christ. I learned that my sins could be redeemed. I learned that those things I was too weak to accomplish myself, He would accomplish with me if I placed my trust in Him. And in time, I came to see faith as more than just a comfort to the weary or a hedge against death, but rather as an active, palpable agent in the world and in my own life. It was because of these newfound understandings that I was finally able to walk down the aisle of Trinity one day and affirm my Christian faith. It came about as a choice, and not an epiphany. I didn't fall out in church, as folks sometimes do. The questions I had didn't magically disappear. The skeptical bent of my mind didn't suddenly vanish. But kneeling beneath that cross on the South Side, I felt I heard God's spirit beckoning me. I submitted myself to His will, and dedicated myself to discovering His truth and carrying out His works." [Speech, 6/23/07] Barack Obama Is Not and Has Never Been a Muslim. Obama never prayed in a mosque. He has never been a Muslim, was not raised a Muslim, and is a committed Christian who attends the United Church of Christ. Obama's Step-Father Saw Religion "As Not Particularly Useful," But Followed "A Brand of Islam" That Made Room for Animist and Hindu Faiths. Obama wrote in the Audacity of Hope, "When my mother remarried, it was to an Indonesian with an equally skeptical bent, a man who saw religion as not particularly useful in the practical business of making one's way in the world, and who had grown up in a country that easily blended its Islamic faith with remnants of Hinduism, Buddhism, and ancient animist traditions." Obama wrote in Dreams from My Father, "Like many Indonesians, Lolo followed a brand of Islam that could make room for the remnants of more ancient animist and Hindu faiths." [Audacity of Hope, p 204; Dreams From My Father, p 37] Obama Found Faith During Community Organizing Days. "It was at Trinity United Church of Christ here, in the late 1980s, that Senator Obama says he found religion. Raised in a secular household, with ancestral roots running from Islam to Baptist to atheist, Obama had grown up a skeptic. But Mr. Wright's blend of scripture and social action resonated with Obama, then a young community organizer in black neighborhoods ravaged by steel-mill closings." [Christian Science Monitor, 7/16/07]
  • 23 Mar 2008
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3:34
Obama Takes on Question of Christian Faith Keywords: 2008 Election, Barack Obama, Barack Obama 2008, Christian Faith, Religion, Calling, Committed Christian, Christianity, Prayer, Barack Obama Muslim, Barack Obama Race, Democratic Presidential Candidate, Democratic Primary, Obama, Obama Muslim, Obama Muslim Email, Obama Muslim Smear, Obama Pledge Of Allegiance, Pledge Of Allegiance, Breaking Politics News COLUMBIA, S.C. — Barack Obama is stepping up his effort to correct the misconception that he's a Muslim now that the presidential campaign has hit the Bible Belt. At a rally to kick off a weeklong campaign for the South Carolina primary, Obama tried to set the record straight from an attack circulating widely on the Internet that is designed to play into prejudices against Muslims and fears of terrorism. "I've been to the same church _ the same Christian church _ for almost 20 years," Obama said, stressing the word Christian and drawing cheers from the faithful in reply. "I was sworn in with my hand on the family Bible. Whenever I'm in the United States Senate, I pledge allegiance to the flag of the United States of America. So if you get some silly e-mail ... send it back to whoever sent it and tell them this is all crazy. Educate." Obama is referring to a debunked chain e-mail circulating widely on the Internet that suggests he is hiding his Islamic roots and may be a terrorist in disguise. It says he was sworn into the Senate on the Quran and turns his back on the flag during the pledge. There are some truths in the e-mail's details. Obama's middle name is Hussein. His father and stepfather were Muslim. And he spent part of his childhood in Indonesia, a largely Muslim country. But he attended secular and Catholic schools, not a radical madrassa. His campaign has been pushing back against the false rumors all year. His aides decried an incorrect news report that Obama was educated in a Muslim madrassa and a section of his Web site is devoted to correct that and other false rumors circulating on the Internet. But they are stepping up the effort now that the campaign has hit South Carolina and soon turns to other southern states where religion is so important to voters. The campaign distributed an open letter from seven Jewish senators this weekend condemning the attacks; aides are planning an event this week to respond directly to the e-mails; and campaign representatives blanketed South Carolina churches Sunday with literature that touted Obama's Christian faith. One piece features photos of Obama praying with the words "COMMITTED CHRISTIAN" in large letters across the middle. It says Obama will be a president "guided by his Christian faith" and includes a quote from him saying, "I believe in the power of prayer." A second piece, which like the first doesn't mention the Muslim rumor, includes photos of Obama with his family and a caption that says they are active members of Trinity United Church of Christ in Chicago. It explains how as a young man Obama "felt a beckoning of the spirit and accepted Jesus Christ into his life." Obama says he's going to fight harder against other mischaracterizations about his positions that he says are being perpetrated by rival Hillary Rodham Clinton and her husband, the former president. "When I see Senator Clinton, President Clinton distort my words ... that is not a way to move the debate forward, that is not a way to help the American people," Obama said during his rally at the Columbia Convention Center. "I am not running for president just to become president, I'm running to help the American people. I'm not willing to say or do anything just to win an election."
  • 23 Jan 2008
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BLITZER: OK. Thank you, Senator. Senator, we're a little off topic. I have to let Senator Obama respond, then Senator Edwards, who's going to come... OBAMA: We're off topic, but... BLITZER: But go ahead and respond, and then I want to get back to this issue that we're talking about, fiscal responsibility. But go ahead. OBAMA: Let's talk about it. Hillary, I will be happy to provide you with the information about all -- all the spending that we do. Now, let's talk about Ronald Reagan. What you just repeated here today is... CLINTON: Barack... OBAMA: Wait. No. Hillary, you just spoke. CLINTON: I did not say anything about Ronald Reagan. OBAMA: You just spoke for two minutes. CLINTON: You said two things. OBAMA: You just... CLINTON: You talked about admiring Ronald Reagan and you talked about the ideas... OBAMA: Hillary, I'm sorry. You just... BLITZER: Senator... CLINTON: I didn't talk about Reagan. OBAMA: Hillary, we just had the tape. You just said that I complimented the Republican ideas. That is not true. What I said -- and I will provide you with a quote -- what I said was is that Ronald Reagan was a transformative political figure because he was able to get Democrats to vote against their economic interests to form a majority to push through their agenda, an agenda that I objected to. Because while I was working on those streets watching those folks see their jobs shift overseas, you were a corporate lawyer sitting on the board at Wal-Mart. (APPLAUSE) OBAMA: I was fighting these fights. I was fighting these fights. So -- but I want to be clear. So I want to be clear. What I said had nothing to do with their policies. I spent a lifetime fighting a lifetime against Ronald Reagan's policies. But what I did say is that we have to be thinking in the same transformative way about our Democratic agenda. We've got to appeal to Independents and Republicans in order to build a working majority to move an agenda forward. That is what I said. (APPLAUSE) OBAMA: Now, you can dispute that, but let me finish. Hillary, you went on for two minutes. Let me finish. Keywords: SC, South Carolina, Democratic Debate, Barack Obama, Hillary Clinton, book, Tom Brokaw, praises, Ronald Reagan, Republicans The irony of this is that you provided much more fulsome praise of Ronald Reagan in a book by Tom Brokaw that's being published right now, as did -- as did Bill Clinton in the past. So these are the kinds of political games that we are accustomed to.
  • 23 Jan 2008
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