Shawna Karrasch's Channel

Shawna Karrasch's Channel

UPLOADED VIDEOS

  • 1
    Relaxation is Key for a Horse Who Gets Nervous/jigs on the Tr... 10:35

    Relaxation is Key for a Horse Who Gets Nervous/jigs on the Tr...

    by Shawna Karrasch (1/19/14) 6 views

    Trail riding can bring emotional balance to our horse's lives. But some horses can find the unfamiliar environment overwhelming and even terrifying. This tells me that the horse may need more confidence. By doing some general de-spooking exercises we can create a bolder horse, a more relaxed horse. This new found confidence will effect not only his time on the trail but many aspects of his life. The key is to go slow and strive to keep your horse under threshold (the point where things begin to change from un-noteworthy to apprehension) Some horses have been corrected for showing their worry. Often times these horses will go over threshold without overtly showing their concern. By learning to watch for the SMALLEST changes in your horses head carriage, eyes, nose, lips, muscle tension, etc. you can recognize when he may be approaching threshold. This gives us an opportunity to redirect their focus and bring them back to a relaxed state instead of letting it escalate. www.shawnakarrasch.com Distributed by OneLoad.com

  • 2
    Horse with Mounting Issues…counter Conditioning Your Way To... 10:51

    Horse with Mounting Issues…counter Conditioning Your Way To...

    by Shawna Karrasch (1/16/14) 3 views

    This horse once had some pain related to mounting. The physical causes have been cleared up but he still hangs onto the memory of the pain. Using positive reinforcement is a fabulous way to rebuild his association. He will learn to look forward to the rider getting in the saddle. Once he is good with one person begin to start the process again in new situations and eventually introducing new people…but only once he is solid with you. Also check out this link for more mounting videos/blog posts: http://shawnakarrasch.com/blog/?s=mounting Distributed by OneLoad.com

  • 3
    How to Help Mother and Foal with Separation Anxiety 10:33

    How to Help Mother and Foal with Separation Anxiety

    by Shawna Karrasch (1/13/14) 15 views

    The initial separation between a mother and foal can be quite stressful for everyone involved. If possible I don't recommend separating them until the baby is successfully weaned. This may just make it harder when it is time to wean and may have longer lasting effects. I think it would also be quite helpful to get a good, soft professional to come help you out now and then. It will give you extra hands as well as extra eyes for observation. I also have more info and ideas available on my blog…Here are a couple links that may also help. In addition you will find some helpful suggestions for training a foal and getting them off to the right start (search foal). http://shawnakarrasch.com/blog/2013/03/08/helping-your-horse-to-overcome-separation-anxiety-staying-below-threshold/ and http://shawnakarrasch.com/blog/?s=barn%2Fbuddy+sour www.shawnakarrasch.com Distributed by OneLoad.com

  • 4
    Horse Who is Looking for Something Spooky and Who Disengages. 09:09

    Horse Who is Looking for Something Spooky and Who Disengages.

    by Shawna Karrasch (1/11/14) 1 views

    Some horses look for ways to get out of work. Spookiness and "checking out" are common avoidance behaviors for horses. But what is in it for them using traditional (or natural horsemanship) training methods? What does your horse get out of it? By putting something in it for them and building a good reinforcement history with under saddle work, we can turn it into something they enjoy. This horse also has some physical issues that may have created a unpleasant association with work. I sound like a broken record about this…but physical issue can cause emotional issues. Teeth, saddle, mechanics of horse and/or rider, arthritic changes or injury…always check them ALL out first and get them resolved. Often times once the physical issues are cleared up the emotional component is still there and will need to be addressed. I have found positive reinforcement to be the best way to overcome these issues. www.shawnakarrasch.com Distributed by OneLoad.com

  • 5
    Cues, Confusion and Enthusiasm with the Training 12:52

    Cues, Confusion and Enthusiasm with the Training

    by Shawna Karrasch (1/10/14) 7 views

    Clarity is an important component in any training program. There are things we can do to help create more clarity. A basic one is cues (discriminative stimuli). Using verbal cues is terrific but we need to help them to start focusing (discriminating) on the verbal cue. Sometimes they are more responsive to visual cues. By having a verbal cue precede a physical cue we can help them along in this process. Clarity in training will also help to keep them engaged and looking forward to the learning process. BTW…just in case you are wondering...I know Lauren doesn't get to watch the videos so I'll send her the info, but I thought it was a good question and worth posting here too. www.shawnakarrasch Distributed by OneLoad.com

  • 6
    Helping a Horse Who Rushes into the Canter. 09:39

    Helping a Horse Who Rushes into the Canter.

    by Shawna Karrasch (1/8/14) 4 views

    This is a great question since it brings up the subject of balance. I'm talking about mental balance between relaxation and energy….this touches the core of my training philosophy. I want a horse who is happy and ready to engage in activities that involve energy however, I want him to be quite calm, happy and relaxed while we are working together. I see far too many horses who seem to equate physical energy with nervousness or over excitement. But this issue is bigger than just what we see on the outside. I discuss some ways to help this horse create softer, more relaxed canter departs by developing a calmer mental balance. www.shawnkarrasch.com Distributed by OneLoad.com

  • 7
    Helping a Horse Who is Hung Up on the Stationary Target. 05:19

    Helping a Horse Who is Hung Up on the Stationary Target.

    by Shawna Karrasch (1/7/14) 10 views

    Sometimes we can teach the lessons too well! It seems that this horse doesn't want to leave the stationary target after the bridge signal (click). Using movement as well as the handheld target may help to clarify things and set her up for more success. www.shawnakarrasch.com Distributed by OneLoad.com

  • 8
    Encouraging a Filly to Be Bolder...but to Too Bold 08:38

    Encouraging a Filly to Be Bolder...but to Too Bold

    by Shawna Karrasch (1/7/14) 8 views

    Young horses can be timid as they learn to explore their worlds. But we also need to maintain a good balance between bold and brazen. Early learning is important and can help to set them up for a lifetime of good experiences. www.shawnakarrasch.com Distributed by OneLoad.com

  • 9
    Changing a Horses's Attitude About Transitions from Aggressiv... 09:13

    Changing a Horses's Attitude About Transitions from Aggressiv...

    by Shawna Karrasch (1/5/14) 13 views

    Safety is first and foremost in any situations so we always need to keep ouselves and others safe. Horses are not born aggressive…they learn it over time and it usually comes when they perceive a threat. They see it as a matter of survival but it usually works so well that they go there over and over again once they realize that they can get the threat to go away or at least keep it at bay. By putting something in the training equation that the horse values and by giving him free choice…without any pressure, physical or psychological, we can change his attitude from defensive to willing. The key is in super small steps AND in teaching it in a new way. www.shawnakarrasch.com Distributed by OneLoad.com

  • 10
    Helping a Horse Who Has Become Sour to Being in the Arena 08:53

    Helping a Horse Who Has Become Sour to Being in the Arena

    by Shawna Karrasch (1/4/14) 3 views

    Horses can become sour to arena work or in this case…the arena itself. We can rebalance his attitude using some basic counter conditioning and implementing positive reinforcement/clicker training techniques. It is nice if we can figure out what caused this issue in the first place but that isn't always possible. The key is to start by putting the arena into a new context. Using some easy work without a rider and then slowly transitioning the rider back into the equation. Our job is to listen to our horses (staying under threshold) every step of the way, taking care not to progress forward until we know he is quite happy at the current phase. This is especially important as we reintroduce the rider. As I like to say "slow down, you'll go faster!" www.shawnakarrasch.com Distributed by OneLoad.com

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