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Ingrown Toenails Treatment - Podiatrist in Annapolis, MD Patient discusses treatment received by Dr. James McKee for an ingrown toenail. http://www.podiatrygroup.us Ingrown toenails, also known as onychocryptosis, is usually caused by trimming toenails too short, particularly on the sides of the big toes. They may also be caused by shoe pressure (from shoes that are too tight or short), injury, fungus infection, heredity, or poor foot structure. Ingrown toenails occur when the corners or sides of the toenail dig into the skin, often causing infection. A common ailment, ingrown toenails can be painful. Ingrown toenails start out hard, swollen, and tender. Left untreated, they may become sore, red, and infected and the skin may start to grow over the ingrown toenail. In most cases, treating ingrown toenails is simple: soak the foot in warm, soapy water several times each day. Avoid wearing tight shoes or socks. Antibiotics are sometimes prescribed if an infection is present. Note: Please consult your physician before taking any medications. In severe cases, if an acute infection occurs, surgical removal of part of the ingrown toenail may be needed. Known as partial nail plate avulsion, the procedure involves injecting the toe with an anesthetic and cutting out the ingrown part of the toenail. Ingrown toenails can be prevented by: •Trimming toenails straight across with no rounded corners. •Ensuring that shoes and socks are not too tight. •Keeping feet clean at all times. Visit our website: http://www.podiatrygroup.us
13 Jul 2011
174
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1:48
http://www.hsinjurylaw.com/library/perforated-bowel-or-colon-during-hysterectomy-can-cause-major-medical-problems.cfm. My name is Jim Lewis and I'm a personal injury attorney based in Virginia Beach, Virginia. I know many women who have undergone hysterectomies. These procedures are performed because of a few reasons and essentially entail the surgical removal of a lady's uterus. This procedure has been getting performed laparoscopically more and more often. This type of surgery allows the doctor to achieve their surgical goals with a low number of incisions. With this type of surgery, the patient has a shorter hospital stay and recovery process. As nice as it sounds, the laparoscopic instrument offers lower visibility compared to an open incision. The result: one of the most common hysterectomy injuries to date is damage to one or both of the ureters. The ureter must be correctly identified and avoided during this type of procedure. If the ureter is injured, the patient can become quite sick and go through a number of surgeries, which are painful and take months to resolve, to try and fix the problem. Contact our Hampton Roads personal injury law firm If you or someone you know has suffered this type of injury. Our attorneys will help.
27 Oct 2011
154
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0:38
Morton’s Neuroma - Podiatrist in Bethesda, MD and Springfield, VA Dr. Paul Ross discusses the symptoms, causes and treatments for Morton’s Neuroma. http://www.paulrossdpm.com A neuroma is an enlarged, benign growth of nerves, most commonly between the third and fourth toes. Neuromas are caused by tissue rubbing against and irritating the nerves. Pressure from poorly fitting shoes or an abnormal bone structure can also lead to this condition. Symptoms may include sensations of thickness, burning, numbness, tingling, or pain in the ball of the foot. Treatments generally include wearing corrective shoes or orthotics and/or receiving cortisone injections. In severe cases, surgical removal of the growth may be necessary. Visit our website: http://www.paulrossdpm.com YouTube: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=WpqNh2rd_IE&feature=youtu.be
29 Mar 2012
139
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0:42
Foot Surgery and Ankle Surgery - Podiatrist in NYC Lower Manhattan - Jerry Leff, DPM Dr. Jerry Leff of Maiden Lane Podiatry discusses the symptoms, causes and treatments for Foot Surgery and Ankle Surgery. http://maidenlanepodiatry.com Foot and ankle problems usually fall into the following categories: • Acquired from improper footwear, physical stress, or small mechanical changes within the foot. • Arthritic foot problems, which typically involve one or more joint. • Congenital foot problems, which occur at birth and are generally inherited. • Infectious foot problems, which are caused by bacterial, viral, or fungal disorders. • Neoplastic disorders, usually called tumors, which are the result of abnormal growth of tissue and may be benign or malignant. • Traumatic foot problems, which are associated with foot and ankle injuries. The top foot problems are: • Bunions - misaligned big toe joints that can become swollen and tender, causing the first joint of the big toe to slant outward, and the second joint to angle toward the other toes. Bunions tend to be hereditary, but can be aggravated by shoes that are too narrow in the forefoot and toe. Surgery is frequently performed to correct the problem. • Hammertoe - a condition, usually stemming from muscle imbalance, in which the toe is bent in a claw-like position. It occurs most frequently with the second toe, often when a bunion slants the big toe toward and under it, but any of the other three smaller toes can be affected. Selecting shoes and socks that do not cramp the toes will alleviate aggravation. • Heel spurs - growths of bone on the underside, forepart of the heel bone. Heel spurs occur when the plantar tendon pulls at its attachment to the heel bone. This area of the heel can later calcify to form a spur. With proper warm-up and the use of appropriate athletic shoes, strain to the ligament can be reduced. • Ingrown nails - toenails whose corners or sides dig painfully into the skin. Ingrown toenails are frequently caused by improper nail trimming, but also by shoe pressure, injury, fungus infection, heredity and poor foot structure. Women are much more likely to have ingrown toenails than men. Ingrown nails can be prevented by trimming toenails straight across, selecting proper shoe style and size - not too tapered or shallow - and paying special attention to foot pain. • Neuromas - enlarged benign growths of nerves, most commonly between the third and fourth toes. They are caused by tissue rubbing against and irritating the nerves. Pressure from ill-fitting shoes or abnormal bone structure can also lead to this condition. Treatments include orthoses (shoe inserts) and/or cortisone injections, but surgical removal of the growth is sometimes necessary. • Plantar fasciitis (heel pain) - usually caused by an inflammation on the bottom of the foot. Our practice can evaluate arch pain, and may prescribe customized shoe inserts called orthoses to help alleviate the pain. • Sesamoiditis - inflammation or rupture of the two small bones (sesamoids) under the first metatarsal bones. Proper shoe selection and orthoses can help. • Shin splints - pain to either side of the leg bone, caused by muscle or tendon inflammation. It is commonly related to excessive foot pronation (collapsing arch), but may be related to a muscle imbalance between opposing muscle groups in the leg. Proper stretching and corrective orthoses (shoe inserts) for pronation can help prevent shin splints. • Stress fractures - incomplete cracks in bone caused by overuse. With complete rest, stress fractures heal quickly. Extra padding in shoes helps prevent the condition. Stress fractures left untreated may become complete fractures, which require casting and immobilization. Visit our website: http://maidenlanepodiatry.com
12 Jun 2012
148
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0:48
Podiatrist Erie, PA Discusses Ingrown Toenail http://eriepodiatrists.com Ingrown toenails, also known as onychocryptosis, is usually caused by trimming toenails too short, particularly on the sides of the big toes. They may also be caused by shoe pressure (from shoes that are too tight or short), injury, fungus infection, heredity, or poor foot structure. Ingrown toenails occur when the corners or sides of the toenail dig into the skin, often causing infection. A common ailment, ingrown toenails can be painful. Ingrown toenails start out hard, swollen, and tender. Left untreated, they may become sore, red, and infected and the skin may start to grow over the ingrown toenail. In most cases, treating ingrown toenails is simple: soak the foot in warm, soapy water several times each day. Avoid wearing tight shoes or socks. Antibiotics are sometimes prescribed if an infection is present. Note: Please consult your physician before taking any medications. In severe cases, if an acute infection occurs, surgical removal of part of the ingrown toenail may be needed. Known as partial nail plate avulsion, the procedure involves injecting the toe with an anesthetic and cutting out the ingrown part of the toenail. Ingrown toenails can be prevented by: •Trimming toenails straight across with no rounded corners. •Ensuring that shoes and socks are not too tight. •Keeping feet clean at all times. Visit our website: http://eriepodiatrists.com
11 Mar 2011
148
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0:44
Morton’s Neuroma - Podiatrist in Chandler, Sun Lakes and Phoenix, AZ Dr Alan Discont discusses the symptoms, causes and treatments for Morton’s Neuroma. http://www.chandlerfootandanklecare.com Neuroma Neuromas are enlarged benign growths of nerves, most commonly between the third and fourth toes. They are caused by tissue rubbing against and irritating the nerves. Pressure from poorly-fitting shoes or abnormal bone structure can create the condition as well. Treatments include special shoes or inserts and/or cortisone injections, but surgical removal of the growth is sometimes necessary. Visit our website: http://www.chandlerfootandanklecare.com
30 Aug 2011
160
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0:41
Bunion Surgery - Podiatrist in Frederick, Germantown and Hagerstown, MD Dr. Brenna Steinberg discusses Bunion Surgery. http://www.mynewfeet.com Bunions are progressive bone deformities of the foot that often cause recurring or chronic inflammation, irritation, and pain that require surgical correction. Surgical removal of a bunion is called a bunionectomy. However, there are multiple types of bunionectomies, each designed to resolve different structural changes caused by the deformity. Bunion surgeries fall into two major categories: • Head procedures that treat the big toe joint. In a head procedure bunionectomy, the bone is cut just behind the joint, moved into its proper position, and fixed in place with a screw or pin. Head procedures are often used for patients who cannot be immobilized for long periods of time. • Base procedures concentrate on the bone near or behind the big toe joint. Different types of base procedures are conducted depending on the nature of the deformity. These range from cutting a wedge out of the bone and splitting it so that it can be moved into its proper position; making a semi-circular cut and rotating the bone into its correct position; or fusing the joint. Ligaments inside and outside the toe may also be treated during a base procedure. There are three important factors that impact the success of bunion surgery: 1. Choose a surgeon with extensive experience with bunionectomies. Because a deep understanding of the biomechanics of each patient's foot as well as the intricacies of each surgical option is needed, surgeons with more experience at doing bunionectomies are better able to help each patient achieve the best outcome. 2. Be realistic in your expectation about what a bunionectomy can accomplish. No physician can guarantee that a bunion won't recur or that a patient will be absolutely pain free. Additionally, because of the complexity of the foot structures impacted by a bunion, patients may never be able to wear normal or slender shoes. Bunion surgery can reduce or eliminate the bone deformity, improve foot alignment and function, and prevent damage to other toes, but it does have its limitations. Be sure you understand all the possibilities before opting for this surgery. 3. Bunion surgery is not a magic bullet. Surgery alone may not be all that is needed to achieve your best outcome. After surgery, many patients experience long healing and recovery times and often have to spend time in physical therapy. Additionally, you may need a corrective orthotic device on an ongoing basis. What To Expect Most bunions surgeries today are performed on an outpatient basis at a surgical center or hospital. Set aside the entire day for the surgery, although you may only be at the facility for a half day. Prior to the surgery, patients will need to make some preparatory arrangements. These include: • Seeing your Primary Care Physician (PCP) to make sure any other health conditions are stabilized prior to surgery and to document your complete medical history, which can then be given to the foot surgeon. • Arranging your schedule to make sure you don't need to take any long trips for at least two to three weeks following the surgery. • Lining up another person to drive you home and stay with you for the first 24 hours after the surgery. • Stopping the use of any anti-inflammatory medications, such as aspirin, ibuprofen, or acetaminophen, for five to seven days before the surgery. The night before the surgery, you will not be able to eat or drink anything after midnight. You should also wash your foot the night before and morning of the procedure to help reduce surrounding bacteria and prevent infection. Bunion surgery is usually performed with a local anesthetic and is administered by an anesthesiologist. This may be combined with sedation medication to put you into twilight so that you are fully relaxed. After the surgery, patients are often given a long-acting anesthetic and pain medication, which is why someone else must drive the patient home. The type of procedure you have will determine the degree to which you can put weight on the foot immediately after the surgery. Some patients, particularly those having base procedures, may have to use crutches; others may be sent home wearing a surgical shoe. The foot will be covered in a dressing, which you will need to keep dry for up to two weeks or until the sutures are removed. During the first week after surgery, you will need to keep the foot elevated as much as possible. Ice packs also should be applied for the first three to four days to reduce swelling. Limited ambulation or walking is required over the first two weeks to promote healing. Most patients also are instructed on some basic exercises that need to be performed daily. Sutures are generally removed about two weeks after the surgery in the doctor’s office. Once the sutures are removed, you can bathe and shower normally, but will still need to wear a dressing over the wound to keep it clean and prevent infection. By the third or fourth week post surgery, swelling generally subsides enough for the patient to begin wearing a wide athletic shoe. It is important to continue daily exercises. If recommended, physical therapy may be initiated at this time. Once the wound has completely closed, you can use lotions to soften the skin in the surgical area. By week five after the surgery, you will be able to walk short distances and do mild fitness activities. Continue following your surgeons instructions for increasing exercise and activities until you are back to normal. Visit our website: http://www.mynewfeet.com
18 Dec 2011
152
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0:54
Morton’s Neuroma - Miami Beach, Bal Harbour and Bay Harbour, Florida - Podiatrist Gary Curson, DPM Podiatrist Dr. Gary Curson discusses the symptoms, causes and treatments for Morton’s Neuroma. http://www.miamiareafeet.com A neuroma is an enlarged, benign growth of nerves, most commonly between the third and fourth toes. Neuromas are caused by tissue rubbing against and irritating the nerves. Pressure from poorly fitting shoes or an abnormal bone structure can also lead to this condition. Symptoms may include sensations of thickness, burning, numbness, tingling, or pain in the ball of the foot. Treatments generally include wearing corrective shoes or orthotics and/or cortisone injections. In severe cases, surgical removal of the growth may be necessary. Visit our website: http://www.miamiareafeet.com
8 May 2013
153
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0:38
Ingrown Toenail - Podiatry in Cherry Hill, Voorhees and West Deptford, New Jersey Dr. Amy Herskowitz discusses the symptoms, causes and treatment for ingrown toenails. http://www.sjfootdoctors.com Ingrown toenails, also known as onychocryptosis, is usually caused by trimming toenails too short, particularly on the sides of the big toes. They may also be caused by shoe pressure (from shoes that are too tight or short), injury, fungus infection, heredity, or poor foot structure. Ingrown toenails occur when the corners or sides of the toenail dig into the skin, often causing infection. A common ailment, ingrown toenails can be painful. Ingrown toenails start out hard, swollen, and tender. Left untreated, they may become sore, red, and infected and the skin may start to grow over the ingrown toenail. In most cases, treating ingrown toenails is simple: soak the foot in warm, soapy water several times each day. Avoid wearing tight shoes or socks. Antibiotics are sometimes prescribed if an infection is present. Note: Please consult your physician before taking any medications. In severe cases, if an acute infection occurs, surgical removal of part of the ingrown toenail may be needed. Known as partial nail plate avulsion, the procedure involves injecting the toe with an anesthetic and cutting out the ingrown part of the toenail. Ingrown toenails can be prevented by: •Trimming toenails straight across with no rounded corners. •Ensuring that shoes and socks are not too tight. •Keeping feet clean at all times. Visit our website: http://www.sjfootdoctors.com
28 Jun 2011
134
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0:57
Ingrown Toenails - Podiatrist Indianapolis and Franklin, IN Dr. Jeffrey Stevens of Indy South Foot and Ankle discusses the symptoms, causes and treatments for Ingrown Toenails. http://www.indysouthfootandankle.com Ingrown toenails, also known as onychocryptosis, is usually caused by trimming toenails too short, particularly on the sides of the big toes. They may also be caused by shoe pressure (from shoes that are too tight or short), injury, fungus infection, heredity, or poor foot structure. Ingrown toenails occur when the corners or sides of the toenail dig into the skin, often causing infection. A common ailment, ingrown toenails can be painful. Ingrown toenails start out hard, swollen, and tender. Left untreated, they may become sore, red, and infected and the skin may start to grow over the ingrown toenail. In most cases, treating ingrown toenails is simple: soak the foot in warm, soapy water several times each day. Avoid wearing tight shoes or socks. Antibiotics are sometimes prescribed if an infection is present. Note: Please consult your physician before taking any medications. In severe cases, if an acute infection occurs, surgical removal of part of the ingrown toenail may be needed. Known as partial nail plate avulsion, the procedure involves injecting the toe with an anesthetic and cutting out the ingrown part of the toenail. Ingrown toenails can be prevented by: • Trimming toenails straight across with no rounded corners. • Ensuring that shoes and socks are not too tight. • Keeping feet clean at all times. Visit our website: http://www.indysouthfootandankle.com
11 Jan 2012
147
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0:40
Morton's Neuroma - Podiatrist in Frederick, Germantown and Hagerstown, MD Dr. Brenna Steinberg of Frederick Foot & Ankle Specialists discusses the symptoms, causes and treatments for Morton's Neuroma. http://www.mynewfeet.com A neuroma is an enlarged, benign growth of nerves, most commonly between the third and fourth toes. Neuromas are caused by tissue rubbing against and irritating the nerves. Pressure from poorly fitting shoes or an abnormal bone structure can also lead to this condition. Symptoms may include sensations of thickness, burning, numbness, tingling, or pain in the ball of the foot. Treatments generally include wearing corrective shoes or orthotics and/or receiving cortisone injections. In severe cases, surgical removal of the growth may be necessary. Morton's neuroma is a thickening of tissues around the nerve that leads to the toes. Morton's neuroma usually develops between the third and fourth toes in response to irritation, such as that caused by wearing high-heeled or narrow shoes, or from trauma. Symptoms may include a burning pain that radiates from the ball of the foot to the toes or numbness in the toes. Conservative treatments usually resolve the pain or progressions of the condition, and range from wearing roomier, lower-heeled footwear or using orthotics to reduce the pressure on the nerve, to injections of cortosteroid medication to reduce swelling and inflammation. Visit our website: http://www.mynewfeet.com
17 Feb 2012
146
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0:50
Ingrown Toenails – Palm Coast and Fleming Island, FL Podiatrist http://www.healthparkdocs.com Ingrown toenails, also known as onychocryptosis, is usually caused by trimming toenails too short, particularly on the sides of the big toes. They may also be caused by shoe pressure (from shoes that are too tight or short), injury, fungus infection, heredity, or poor foot structure. Ingrown toenails occur when the corners or sides of the toenail dig into the skin, often causing infection. A common ailment, ingrown toenails can be painful. Ingrown toenails start out hard, swollen, and tender. Left untreated, they may become sore, red, and infected and the skin may start to grow over the ingrown toenail. In most cases, treating ingrown toenails is simple: soak the foot in warm, soapy water several times each day. Avoid wearing tight shoes or socks. Antibiotics are sometimes prescribed if an infection is present. Note: Please consult your physician before taking any medications. In severe cases, if an acute infection occurs, surgical removal of part of the ingrown toenail may be needed. Known as partial nail plate avulsion, the procedure involves injecting the toe with an anesthetic and cutting out the ingrown part of the toenail. Ingrown toenails can be prevented by: •Trimming toenails straight across with no rounded corners. •Ensuring that shoes and socks are not too tight. •Keeping feet clean at all times. Visit our website: http://www.healthparkdocs.com
27 Jun 2011
116
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0:45
Morton’s Neuroma - Podiatrist in Valley Stream and Lake Success, NY Dr. Mleczko of Long Island Podiatry Group discusses the symptoms, causes and treatments for Morton’s Neuroma http://www.LIPods.com A neuroma is an enlarged, benign growth of nerves, most commonly between the third and fourth toes. Neuromas are caused by tissue rubbing against and irritating the nerves. Pressure from poorly fitting shoes or an abnormal bone structure can also lead to this condition. Symptoms may include sensations of thickness, burning, numbness, tingling, or pain in the ball of the foot. Treatments generally include wearing corrective shoes or orthotics and/or receiving cortisone injections. In severe cases, surgical removal of the growth may be necessary. Visit our website: http://www.LIPods.com http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=OapnFJe0Z7A
24 Apr 2012
125
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1:49
Ingrown Toenails - Podiatrist in Havertown, PA Ingrown toenails, also known as onychocryptosis, is usually caused by trimming toenails too short, particularly on the sides of the big toes. They may also be caused by shoe pressure (from shoes that are too tight or short), injury, fungus infection, heredity, or poor foot structure. Ingrown toenails occur when the corners or sides of the toenail dig into the skin, often causing infection. A common ailment, ingrown toenails can be painful. Ingrown toenails start out hard, swollen, and tender. Left untreated, they may become sore, red, and infected and the skin may start to grow over the ingrown toenail. In most cases, treating ingrown toenails is simple: soak the foot in warm, soapy water several times each day. Avoid wearing tight shoes or socks. Antibiotics are sometimes prescribed if an infection is present. Note: Please consult your physician before taking any medications. In severe cases, if an acute infection occurs, surgical removal of part of the ingrown toenail may be needed. Known as partial nail plate avulsion, the procedure involves injecting the toe with an anesthetic and cutting out the ingrown part of the toenail. Ingrown toenails can be prevented by: •Trimming toenails straight across with no rounded corners. •Ensuring that shoes and socks are not too tight. •Keeping feet clean at all times. Visit our website: http://www.afootabovepodiatry.com
30 Nov 2010
144
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0:40
What is a Neuroma? - Podiatrist in Cherry Hill, Voorhees and West Deptford, NJ Dr. Amy Herskowitz discusses the symptoms, causes and treatment for neuromas. http://www.sjfootdoctors.com A neuroma is an enlarged, benign growth of nerves, most commonly between the third and fourth toes. Neuromas are caused by tissue rubbing against and irritating the nerves. Pressure from poorly fitting shoes or an abnormal bone structure can also lead to this condition. Symptoms may include sensations of thickness, burning, numbness, tingling, or pain in the ball of the foot. Treatments generally include wearing corrective shoes or orthotics and/or cortisone injections. In severe cases, surgical removal of the growth may be necessary. Morton's neuroma is a thickening of tissues around the nerve that leads to the toes. Morton's neuroma usually develops between the third and fourth toes in response to irritation, such as that caused by wearing high-heeled or narrow shoes, or from trauma. Symptoms may include a burning pain that radiates from the ball of the foot to the toes or numbness in the toes. Conservative treatments usually resolve the pain or progressions of the condition, and range from wearing roomier, lower-heeled footwear or using orthotics to reduce the pressure on the nerve, to injections of cortosteroid medication to reduce swelling and inflammation. Visit our website: http://www.sjfootdoctors.com
28 Jun 2011
123
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0:39
Neuroma - Podiatrist in Southport and Shallotte, NC Dr. Bryan Satterwhite of Atlantic Foot Specialists discusses the symptoms, causes and treatments for Neuromas. http://www.atlanticfootspecialists.com A neuroma is an enlarged, benign growth of nerves, most commonly between the third and fourth toes. Neuromas are caused by tissue rubbing against and irritating the nerves. Pressure from poorly fitting shoes or an abnormal bone structure can also lead to this condition. Symptoms may include sensations of thickness, burning, numbness, tingling, or pain in the ball of the foot. Treatments generally include wearing corrective shoes or orthotics and/or receiving cortisone injections. In severe cases, surgical removal of the growth may be necessary. Morton's neuroma is a thickening of tissues around the nerve that leads to the toes. Morton's neuroma usually develops between the third and fourth toes in response to irritation, such as that caused by wearing high-heeled or narrow shoes, or from trauma. Symptoms may include a burning pain that radiates from the ball of the foot to the toes or numbness in the toes. Conservative treatments usually resolve the pain or progressions of the condition, and range from wearing roomier, lower-heeled footwear or using orthotics to reduce the pressure on the nerve, to injections of cortosteroid medication to reduce swelling and inflammation. Visit our website: http://www.atlanticfootspecialists.com
24 Jan 2012
121
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