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Prevent Ingrown Toenail - Podiatry in Millburn, Livingston and Maplewood, NJ Patient discusses the treatment for ingrown toenails. *******www.thepodiatrycenter**** Ingrown toenails often are the result of trimming your toenails too short, particularly on the sides of your big toes. While they are common, ingrown toenails can be painful. When trimming your nails, avoid tapering the corners so that the nail curves with the shape of your toe. The sides of the nail will curl down and dig into your skin. Shoes that are too tight or short also may cause ingrown toenails. Ingrown toenail start out hard, swollen and tender, and later, may become sore, red and infected. Your skin may start to grow over the ingrown toenail. Soaking your foot in warm, soapy water several times each day is usually a good way to treat an ingrown nail. Please contact our office to determine the best course of treatment for your condition. Antibiotics are sometimes prescribed if an infection is present. Part of your ingrown toenail (partial nail plate avulsion) may need to be surgically removed if an acute infection occurs. The procedure involves injecting the toe with an anesthetic and cutting out the ingrown part of the toenail. You can prevent ingrown toenails by: Trimming your toenails straight across with no rounded corners. Ensuring that your shoes and socks are not too tight. Keeping your feet clean at all times. Visit our website: *******www.thepodiatrycenter****
5 Jul 2011
336
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0:50
Podiatrist in Dayton, OH - Ingrown Toenails Ingrown toenails, also known as onychocryptosis, is usually caused by trimming toenails too short, particularly on the sides of the big toes. They may also be caused by shoe pressure (from shoes that are too tight or short), injury, fungus infection, heredity, or poor foot structure. Ingrown toenails occur when the corners or sides of the toenail dig into the skin, often causing infection. A common ailment, ingrown toenails can be painful. Ingrown toenails start out hard, swollen, and tender. Left untreated, they may become sore, red, and infected and the skin may start to grow over the ingrown toenail. In most cases, treating ingrown toenails is simple: soak the foot in warm, soapy water several times each day. Avoid wearing tight shoes or socks. Antibiotics are sometimes prescribed if an infection is present. Note: Please consult your physician before taking any medications. In severe cases, if an acute infection occurs, surgical removal of part of the ingrown toenail may be needed. Known as partial nail plate avulsion, the procedure involves injecting the toe with an anesthetic and cutting out the ingrown part of the toenail. Ingrown toenails can be prevented by: Trimming toenails straight across with no rounded corners. Ensuring that shoes and socks are not too tight. Keeping feet clean at all times. Visit our website: *******www.footandanklecare****
31 May 2010
260
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1:43
Foot Pain and Foot Surgery - Podiatrist in Kingwood and Humble, TX Patient discusses foot pain and foot surgery by Dr. Michael Wynn of Foot Care Associates of Texas. *******www.michaelwynndpm**** *******www.youtube****/watch?v=Nbg0x8MV0zg Foot and ankle problems usually fall into the following categories: • Acquired from improper footwear, physical stress, or small mechanical changes within the foot. • Arthritic foot problems, which typically involve one or more joints. • Congenital foot problems, which occur at birth and are generally inherited. • Infectious foot problems, which are caused by bacterial, viral, or fungal problems. • Neoplastic disorders, also known as tumors, which are the result of abnormal growth of tissue anywhere on the foot and may be benign or malignant. • Traumatic foot problems, which are associated with foot and ankle injuries, such as fractures. Leading foot problems are: • Bunions—misaligned big toe joints that swell and become tender, causing the first joint of the big toe to slant outward and the second joint to angle toward the other toes. Bunions tend to be hereditary, but can be aggravated by shoes that are too narrow in the forefoot and toe. Surgery is frequently performed to correct the problem. • Hammertoes—usually stemming from muscle imbalance, this condition occurs when the toe is bent into a claw-like position. Hammertoe can affect any toe, but most frequently occurs to the second toe, when a bunion slants the big toe toward and under it. Selecting shoes and socks that do not cramp the toes may help alleviate any aggravation of pain or discomfort. • Heel Spurs—growths of bone on the underside, forepart of the heel bone. Heel spurs occur when the plantar tendon pulls at its attachment to the heel bone. This area of the heel later calcifies to form a spur. Proper warm-up and the use of appropriate athletic shoes can reduce the strain to the ligament and prevent the formation of heel spurs. • Ingrown Toenails—toenails with corners or sides that dig painfully into the skin. Ingrown toenails are usually caused by improper nail trimming, but can also result from shoe pressure, injury, fungus infection, heredity, and poor foot structure. Women are more likely to have ingrown toenails than men. The problem can be prevented by trimming toenails straight across, selecting proper shoe styles and sizes, and responding to foot pain in a timely manner. • Neuromas—enlarged benign growths of nerves, most commonly between the third and fourth toes. Neuromas are caused by tissue rubbing against and irritating the nerves. Pressure from ill-fitting shoes or abnormal bone structure can also lead to this condition. Depending on the severity, treatments may include orthotics (shoe inserts), cortisone injections, and, in extreme cases, surgical removal of the growth. • Plantar Fasciitis—an inflammation on the bottom of the foot that leads to heel and/or arch pain. A variety of foot injuries or improper foot mechanics can lead to plantar fasciitis. Treatments range from icing and foot exercises to the prescription of custom orthotics to correct the foot position and help alleviate pain. • Sesamoiditis—an inflammation or rupture of the two small bones (known as sesamoids) under the first metatarsal bone. Proper shoe selection and orthotics can help. • Shin Splints—pain on either side of the leg bone caused by muscle or tendon inflammation. Shin splints are related to excessive foot pronation, but also may be related to a muscle imbalance between opposing muscle groups in the leg. Proper stretching before and after exercise and corrective orthotics for pronation can help prevent shin splints. • Stress Fractures—incomplete cracks in bone caused by overuse. With complete rest, stress fractures in toes or any bones of the foot heal quickly. Extra padding in shoes can help prevent the condition. Left untreated, stress fractures may become complete bone fractures, which require casting and immobilization. Visit our website: *******www.michaelwynndpm****
10 Apr 2012
324
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0:57
Ingrown Toenails Treatment - Podiatrist Indianapolis and Franklin, IN Dr. Jeffrey Stevens of Indy South Foot and Ankle discusses the symptoms, causes and treatments for Ingrown Toenails. *******www.indysouthfootandankle**** Ingrown toenails, also known as onychocryptosis, is usually caused by trimming toenails too short, particularly on the sides of the big toes. They may also be caused by shoe pressure (from shoes that are too tight or short), injury, fungus infection, heredity, or poor foot structure. Ingrown toenails occur when the corners or sides of the toenail dig into the skin, often causing infection. A common ailment, ingrown toenails can be painful. Ingrown toenails start out hard, swollen, and tender. Left untreated, they may become sore, red, and infected and the skin may start to grow over the ingrown toenail. In most cases, treating ingrown toenails is simple: soak the foot in warm, soapy water several times each day. Avoid wearing tight shoes or socks. Antibiotics are sometimes prescribed if an infection is present. Note: Please consult your physician before taking any medications. In severe cases, if an acute infection occurs, surgical removal of part of the ingrown toenail may be needed. Known as partial nail plate avulsion, the procedure involves injecting the toe with an anesthetic and cutting out the ingrown part of the toenail. Ingrown toenails can be prevented by: • Trimming toenails straight across with no rounded corners. • Ensuring that shoes and socks are not too tight. • Keeping feet clean at all times. Visit our website: *******www.indysouthfootandankle****
11 Jan 2012
237
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0:50
Podiatrist in Troy Ohio - Neuroma Patient Testimonial Visit our website: *******www.footandanklecare**** Neuromas are enlarged, benign growth of nerves, most commonly between the third and fourth toes. Neuromas are caused by tissue rubbing against and irritating the nerves. Pressure from poorly fitting shoes or an abnormal bone structure can also lead to this condition. Symptoms may include sensations of thickness, burning, numbness, tingling, or pain in the ball of the foot.Treatments generally include wearing corrective shoes or orthotics and/or cortisone injections. In severe cases, surgical removal of the growth may be necessary. Morton's neuroma is a thickening of tissues around the nerve that leads to the toes. Morton's neuroma usually develops between the third and fourth toes in response to irritation, such as that caused by wearing high-heeled or narrow shoes, or from trauma. Symptoms may include a burning pain that radiates from the ball of the foot to the toes or numbness in the toes. Conservative treatments usually resolve the pain or progressions of the condition, and range from wearing roomier, lower-heeled footwear or using orthotics to reduce the pressure on the nerve, to injections of cortosteroid medication to reduce swelling and inflammation.
24 Jul 2010
160
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1:53
Treatment of Ingrown Toenail - NYC Podiatrist Manhattan and White Plains, NY Dr. Jeff Adler discusses the symptoms, causes and treatments for Ingrown Toenail. Ingrown toenails, also known as onychocryptosis, is usually caused by trimming toenails too short, particularly on the sides of the big toes. They may also be caused by shoe pressure (from shoes that are too tight or short), injury, fungus infection, heredity, or poor foot structure. Ingrown toenails occur when the corners or sides of the toenail dig into the skin, often causing infection. A common ailment, ingrown toenails can be painful. Ingrown toenails start out hard, swollen, and tender. Left untreated, they may become sore, red, and infected and the skin may start to grow over the ingrown toenail. In most cases, treating ingrown toenails is simple: soak the foot in warm, soapy water several times each day. Avoid wearing tight shoes or socks. Antibiotics are sometimes prescribed if an infection is present. Note: Please consult your physician before taking any medications. In severe cases, if an acute infection occurs, surgical removal of part of the ingrown toenail may be needed. Known as partial nail plate avulsion, the procedure involves injecting the toe with an anesthetic and cutting out the ingrown part of the toenail. Ingrown toenails can be prevented by: • Trimming toenails straight across with no rounded corners. • Ensuring that shoes and socks are not too tight. • Keeping feet clean at all times. Visit our website: *******www.adlerfootcare****
23 Aug 2011
257
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1:04
Ingrown Toenails Treatment - Chiropodist Toronto, ON Chiropodist Marz Hardy of Academy Foot and Orthotic Clinics discusses the symptoms, causes and treatments for Ingrown Toenails. *******www.academyclinics**** Ingrown Toenails Ingrown toenails, also known as onychocryptosis, is usually caused by trimming toenails too short, particularly on the sides of the big toes. They may also be caused by shoe pressure (from shoes that are too tight or short), injury, fungus infection, heredity, or poor foot structure. Ingrown toenails occur when the corners or sides of the toenail dig into the skin, often causing infection. A common ailment, ingrown toenails can be painful. Ingrown toenails start out hard, swollen, and tender. Left untreated, they may become sore, red, and infected and the skin may start to grow over the ingrown toenail. In most cases, treating ingrown toenails is simple: soak the foot in warm, soapy water several times each day. Avoid wearing tight shoes or socks. Antibiotics are sometimes prescribed if an infection is present. Note: Please consult your physician before taking any medications. In severe cases, if an acute infection occurs, surgical removal of part of the ingrown toenail may be needed. Known as partial nail plate avulsion, the procedure involves injecting the toe with an anesthetic and cutting out the ingrown part of the toenail. Ingrown toenails can be prevented by: • Trimming toenails straight across with no rounded corners. • Ensuring that shoes and socks are not too tight. • Keeping feet clean at all times. Visit our website: *******www.academyclinics****
6 Dec 2011
286
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0:59
Bunion Surgery (Bunionectomy) - foot Doctor of Podiatric Medicine, Foot Specialist, Toronto, ON Podiatrist Sheldon Nadal discusses Bunion Surgery (Bunionectomy). Bunions are progressive bone deformities of the foot that often cause recurring or chronic inflammation, irritation, and pain that require surgical correction. Surgical removal of a bunion is called a bunionectomy. However, there are multiple types of bunionectomies, each designed to resolve different structural changes caused by the deformity. Visit our website: *******www.footcare**** YouTube: *******www.youtube****/watch?v=KQ5BZhyQleQ
21 Mar 2012
310
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1:07
Morton’s Neuroma - Podiatrist Austin TX Dr. Michael Golf discusses the symptoms, causes and treatments for Morton’s Neuroma. *******www.michaelgolf**** Neuromas are enlarged, benign growth of nerves, most commonly between the third and fourth toes. Neuromas are caused by tissue rubbing against and irritating the nerves. Pressure from poorly fitting shoes or an abnormal bone structure can also lead to this condition. Symptoms may include sensations of thickness, burning, numbness, tingling, or pain in the ball of the foot.Treatments generally include wearing corrective shoes or orthotics and/or cortisone injections. In severe cases, surgical removal of the growth may be necessary. Morton's neuroma is a thickening of tissues around the nerve that leads to the toes. Morton's neuroma usually develops between the third and fourth toes in response to irritation, such as that caused by wearing high-heeled or narrow shoes, or from trauma. Symptoms may include a burning pain that radiates from the ball of the foot to the toes or numbness in the toes. Conservative treatments usually resolve the pain or progressions of the condition, and range from wearing roomier, lower-heeled footwear or using orthotics to reduce the pressure on the nerve, to injections of cortosteroid medication to reduce swelling and inflammation. Visit our website: *******www.michaelgolf****
11 Oct 2011
264
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1:04
Ingrown Toenails - Foot Specialist, Podiatrist and Foot Doctor, Toronto, ON Chiropodist Marz Hardy of Academy Foot and Orthotic Clinics discusses the symptoms, causes and treatments for Ingrown Toenails. *******www.academyclinics**** Ingrown Toenails Ingrown toenails, also known as onychocryptosis, is usually caused by trimming toenails too short, particularly on the sides of the big toes. They may also be caused by shoe pressure (from shoes that are too tight or short), injury, fungus infection, heredity, or poor foot structure. Ingrown toenails occur when the corners or sides of the toenail dig into the skin, often causing infection. A common ailment, ingrown toenails can be painful. Ingrown toenails start out hard, swollen, and tender. Left untreated, they may become sore, red, and infected and the skin may start to grow over the ingrown toenail. In most cases, treating ingrown toenails is simple: soak the foot in warm, soapy water several times each day. Avoid wearing tight shoes or socks. Antibiotics are sometimes prescribed if an infection is present. Note: Please consult your physician before taking any medications. In severe cases, if an acute infection occurs, surgical removal of part of the ingrown toenail may be needed. Known as partial nail plate avulsion, the procedure involves injecting the toe with an anesthetic and cutting out the ingrown part of the toenail. Ingrown toenails can be prevented by: • Trimming toenails straight across with no rounded corners. • Ensuring that shoes and socks are not too tight. • Keeping feet clean at all times. Visit our website: *******www.academyclinics****
22 Dec 2011
289
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3:13
Neuroma - Campbell, San Jose, Saratoga and Silicon Valley - Podiatry Patient discusses treatment received from Dr. Doulgas Robinson for a morton's neuroma. *******www.drrobinson**** A neuroma is an enlarged, benign growth of nerves, most commonly between the third and fourth toes. Neuromas are caused by tissue rubbing against and irritating the nerves. Pressure from poorly fitting shoes or an abnormal bone structure can also lead to this condition. Symptoms may include sensations of thickness, burning, numbness, tingling, or pain in the ball of the foot. Treatments generally include wearing corrective shoes or orthotics and/or cortisone injections. In severe cases, surgical removal of the growth may be necessary. Morton's neuroma is a thickening of tissues around the nerve that leads to the toes. Morton's neuroma usually develops between the third and fourth toes in response to irritation, such as that caused by wearing high-heeled or narrow shoes, or from trauma. Symptoms may include a burning pain that radiates from the ball of the foot to the toes or numbness in the toes. Conservative treatments usually resolve the pain or progressions of the condition, and range from wearing roomier, lower-heeled footwear or using orthotics to reduce the pressure on the nerve, to injections of cortosteroid medication to reduce swelling and inflammation. Visit our website: *******www.drrobinson****
30 May 2011
342
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0:43
Dr. Anas Khoury of North Jersey discusses the symptoms, causes and treatments for Morton's neuroma. *******www.northeasternfootandankle**** Neuromas are enlarged, benign growth of nerves, most commonly between the third and fourth toes. Neuromas are caused by tissue rubbing against and irritating the nerves. Pressure from poorly fitting shoes or an abnormal bone structure can also lead to this condition. Symptoms may include sensations of thickness, burning, numbness, tingling, or pain in the ball of the foot.Treatments generally include wearing corrective shoes or orthotics and/or cortisone injections. In severe cases, surgical removal of the growth may be necessary. Morton's neuroma is a thickening of tissues around the nerve that leads to the toes. Morton's neuroma usually develops between the third and fourth toes in response to irritation, such as that caused by wearing high-heeled or narrow shoes, or from trauma. Symptoms may include a burning pain that radiates from the ball of the foot to the toes or numbness in the toes. Conservative treatments usually resolve the pain or progressions of the condition, and range from wearing roomier, lower-heeled footwear or using orthotics to reduce the pressure on the nerve, to injections of cortosteroid medication to reduce swelling and inflammation. Visit our website: *******www.northeasternfootandankle****
21 Apr 2011
236
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