JAMES BROWN

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JAMES BROWN 43 videos
4:02
James Brown performs his classic hit song, "Kansas City"--Live at the Apollo Theater in New York City, March 1968.. James Brown: Man to Man was a concert film recorded live at the Apollo Theater. It was broadcast as an hour-long syndicated television special and is one of the first color recordings of James Brown. The song was written by Jerry Leiber and Mike Stoller in 1952. James Brown recorded a version of "Kansas City" in 1967 which charted #21R&B and #55 Pop. At James Brown's request, band member Marva Whitney performed "Kansas City" at the conclusion of his public funeral in Augusta, Georgia in 2006. Video transcript: [Music] James Brown: Going to Kansas City. Kansas City here I come. Going to Kansas City. Kansas City here I come. They got some crazy little boxes there, I'm gonna get me one. Look it here. I'll be standing on the corner of Twelfth Street and vine. I'll be standing on the corner of Twelfth Street and vine. With my Kansas City baby and a taste and a taste of city wine. I might take a train or I'd drive a plane. If I have to walk, I'm going there just the same way down to Kansas City. Kansas City here I come. They got some crazy little boxes there. I'm gonna get me one. If I stay with my baby I'm gonna die. Gotta find a new woman and that's the reason why. I'm gone. Kansas City here I come. They got some crazy little boxes there. I'm gonna get me one. [Instrumental Music] James Brown: I'm going, said that I'm going. I'm going, said that I'm going. Can't strain me, the heart can't bare the pain. Going, I'm going. Everybody clap your hands. Clap your hands. Clap your hands. Clap your hands. I got to go. I got to go. The one, two, three, four. [Instrumental Music] Host: How about it ladies and gentleman so proud the number James Brown. James Brown ladies and gentleman. Oh yeah just the guy by himself James Brown. [Instrumental Music] Host: James Brown. Want more of Shout Factory's best picks? GO TO: *******www.shoutfactory****/ten Want more James Brown, go to Shout Factory:
  • 15 Apr 2013
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0:59
James Brown. A clip from the documentary, "The Night James Brown Saved Boston", where James Brown performs "Baby Baby Baby" from "I Got a Feelin'" live at the Boston Garden on April 5, 1968. In the documentary the song is shown in a split screen alongside photos of the riots taking place across the country. In the aftermath of Martin Luther King Jr.'s assassination by James Earl Ray on April 4, 1968, rioting broke out in cities across the country. James Brown had been scheduled to perform at the Boston Garden on April 5th. Boston Mayor Kevin White had initially wanted to cancel all public events, including James Brown's show. As there was concern that the cancellation of the show might cause an escalation of the crisis. it was agreed that James Brown's show would go on. The show, one of the greatest in Boston's history, went on and the city of Boston remained relatively calm. James Brown consoled his mourning audience, dedicated the show to the memory of Dr. King and was instrumental in keeping the peace on the streets of Boston. Released as a single in 1968, "I Got a Feelin" reached #1 on the R&B chart and #6 on the pop chart. The Jackson 5 auditioned for Motown founder Berry Gordy in 1968 with a filmed performance of "I Got the Feelin'" with Michael Jackson at age 10 closely mimicking James Brown's vocal style and dance moves. Video transcript: James Brown: Hey yeah. Baby, baby, baby, baby, baby, baby, baby, baby, baby, baby, baby come on. [Instrumental Music] Newscaster: There is a general uneasiness everywhere and there is wide spattered violence. Stokely crime like all the black power militant, there are negros today to avenge Dr. King's death in the streets. Get guns he said, we have to retaliate for the execution. James Brown: Hey everybody! Male Speaker: Across America reports of rioting were nearly universal, the loan exception, Boston. James Brown's magic was working. Want more of Shout Factory's best picks? GO TO: *******www.shoutfactory****/ten Want more James Brown, go to Shout Factory: *******www.shoutfactory****/jamesbrown Want more James Brown, go to Shout Factory: *******www.shoutfactory****/jamesbrown"
  • 15 Apr 2013
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1:33
James Brown. A clip from the documentary, "The Night James Brown Saved Boston", features Interviews from a clip from "The Night James Brown Saved Boston" discussing James Brown as a spokesperson for the black community. And the importance of being a man on the Mike Douglas Show. Video transcript: Male Speaker 1: Gone was the trademark of the Polydor, in was the afro. James Brown: This is the idea of let's get in together an idea of giving money into the black community. If we can keep a turnover going then we shall overcome only if we all come over. Male Speaker 2: He realized his power. He saw his power. He saw his influence. He discovered that he was somebody. Male Speaker 3: By 1969, the majority of the black activist leaders had been eliminated, jailed, assassinated, and marginalized. One of the few spokespersons for the black community was James Brown. When you see him on the Mike Douglas Show as a guess host, you realize that James Brown was one of the few authentic black representatives that were given some national exposure at that time. He will speak out as to how he felt by not taking a lot of time, you know a lot of people, I don't think he should've said that but that was what he said, what he really wanted to say. James Brown: For a long time, I haven't got a man and I'm still not -- I'm still under the classification as a man. He is saying he is a man, he is a cogman. He's a negro man. Why can't he be a man? Do you call yourself a man known that I pay taxes same as you, staying right here and use my sweat and blood to help build this country and I got to be a segment there and clear the citizen. Do you call that a man? Want more of Shout Factory's best picks? GO TO: *******www.shoutfactory****/ten"
  • 15 Apr 2013
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1:20
James Brown. A clip from the documentary, "The Night James Brown Saved Boston", features Civil Rights activist Dr. Cornel West of Princeton University discussing James Brown's healing music. Video transcript: James Brown in his music always decided to both acknowledge his wounds but still being a wounded healer rather than a wounded hurter. He know he had scars but decided to scarred helper rather than a scarred hater meaning what meaning that even though he disagreed with Martin strategically he knew that rebellious rage in the streets was not going to be the best thing for the American democratic experiment at that moment. Want more of Shout Factory's best picks? GO TO: *******www.shoutfactory****/ten Want more James Brown, go to Shout Factory: *******www.shoutfactory****/jamesbrown"
  • 15 Apr 2013
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1:05
James Brown. A clip from the documentary, "The Night James Brown Saved Boston", features James Brown's unique dance moves in his performances. Several of his friends, including Civil Rights activist Dr. Andrew Young, discuss James Brown's dancing and his showmanship. Video transcript: Female Speaker: Oh boy he had a sexiest dance and I think those women scream and me too. Male Speaker: I always like James Brown dancing and I always like his showmanship. Video transcript: Charles Bobbit: I would ask him why do these people love his music. What is it about his music that would really get him. He said feel your pulse. And I did say, did you feel the beat. I said yes, I stayed in the beat, I stayed in the pulse so if I want to get a message to people or if I want people to dance or people to feel good, I will stay in the pulse. Want more of Shout Factory's best picks? GO TO: *******www.shoutfactory****/ten Want more James Brown, go to Shout Factory: *******www.shoutfactory****/jamesbrown"
  • 15 Apr 2013
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1:34
James Brown. A clip from the documentary, "The Night James Brown Saved Boston", features interviews discussing Boston and the racial segregation in the 1960s. The city of Boston was important to Martin Luther King, Jr. since that is where he met his wife Coretta Scott King and studied for his Ph.D. Video transcript: Cornel West: Boston the cradle of liberty known for her banned books, her baked beans and jokes about our accent. Dr. Andrew Young: Boston was very important for Martin Luther King. He receive his Ph.D. at Boston University. He met his wife at Boston and it was a wonderful time for him it was where he got indoctrinated in the American dream. Martin Luther King: I am delighted to express my support to all that you are seeking to remove racial injustice and segregation from the life of Boston and the life of Massachusetts. Cornel West: Boston historically has been a liberal city in terms of each intellects in self image but deeply segregated based on race in term of its practice. Talk me about give me liberty or give me - Cornel West: Boston is never been a city that is highly appealing to black folk. We don't think of Boston as a center of black life the way you think of Detroit and New York. Dr. Robert Hall: It was a very vulcanized city it isn't a great type neighborhood and by that time Mid 60's they were concentrated and Roxbury and sound end. David Gates: When they it was an island so much is a territory on the other of the devon. It was East Berlin. Want more of Shout Factory's best picks? GO TO: *******www.shoutfactory****/ten Want more James Brown, go to Shout Factory: *******www.shoutfactory****/jamesbrown"
  • 15 Apr 2013
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1:27
James Brown. A clip from the documentary, "The Night James Brown Saved Boston", features band members Marva Whitney and Fred Wesley remembering the night of the live performance at the Boston Garden on April 5, 1968, the fear and the danger. In the aftermath of Martin Luther King Jr.'s assassination by James Earl Ray on April 4, 1968, rioting broke out in cities across the country. James Brown had been scheduled to perform at the Boston Garden on April 5th. Boston Mayor Kevin White had initially wanted to cancel all public events, including James Brown's show. As there was concern that the cancellation of the show might cause an escalation of the crisis. it was agreed that James Brown's show would go on. The show, one of the greatest in Boston's history, went on and the city of Boston remained relatively calm. James Brown consoled his mourning audience, dedicated the show to the memory of Dr. King and was instrumental in keeping the peace on the streets of Boston. Fans rushed the stage in the middle of live performance and the police moved onstage to remove them. James Brown stood between the police and the stage crashers and immediately took control of what could have been a riotous moment in light of the raw emotions of the Black community and the tenuous relationship with the police. James Brown addresses the audience asking if he can finish the show, with the infamous words, "We are Black. Don't make us all look bad." He was asking for "respect from my own people." Video transcript: Marva Whitney: I was on the side and I was a little nervous. I was praying, please don't let anything happen. The whole stage from the left to the right was lined up with policemen. We were afraid for him because he wasn't scared of anything. [Playing song] wait a minute, I will be fine. Fred Wesley: He knew that a riot could erupt, you know and he didn't want that to happen and any more than I did any body else. Want more of Shout Factory's best picks? GO TO: *******www.shoutfactory****/ten Want more James Brown, go to Shout Factory: *******www.shoutfactory****/jamesbrown"
  • 15 Apr 2013
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1:12
James Brown. A clip from the documentary, "The Night James Brown Saved Boston", features interviews with James Brown and friends discussing his childhood, the time he spent in jail and his determination to straighten himself out. Video transcript: Cornel West: When he was small he broke both legs playing football whose name is crips or cripple in the head. Cast on one leg is still grit will, determination. I just better going to play football with the cast and is still [inaudible 0:00:23] that is James Brown. Narrator: James Brown was raised by two aunts and a brother in the coast of Georgia. He dropped out at school in the seventh age 16, went to jail for stealing a car. James Brown: I am 8 to 16 years. 8 to 16 years that is the long time. So that was three and I am going to my fourth year and I decided that I better straighten myself up. Got your highest sneakers on. It's slippin' new. Got your highest sneakers on. And you're slippin' new. You're more than alright. You know you're out of sight. Want more of Shout Factory's best picks? GO TO: *******www.shoutfactory****/ten Want more James Brown, go to Shout Factory: *******www.shoutfactory****/jamesbrown"
  • 15 Apr 2013
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1:32
James Brown. A clip from the documentary, "The Night James Brown Saved Boston", features James Brown paying respect to Martin Luther King, Jr. at the beginning of his live concert at the Boston Garden, April 5, 1968. The clip features discussion on James Brown's motivation to perform the night after Dr. King's assassination by James Earl Ray and the risk he was taking going onstage. In the aftermath of Martin Luther King Jr.'s assassination on April 4, 1968, rioting broke out in cities across the country. James Brown had been scheduled to perform at the Boston Garden on April 5th. Boston Mayor Kevin White had initially wanted to cancel all public events, including James Brown's show. As there was concern that the cancellation of the show might cause an escalation of the crisis. it was agreed that James Brown's show would go on. The show, one of the greatest in Boston's history, went on and the city of Boston remained relatively calm. James Brown consoled his mourning audience, dedicated the show to the memory of Dr. King and was instrumental in keeping the peace on the streets of Boston. Fans rushed the stage in the middle of live performance and the police moved onstage to remove them. James Brown stood between the police and the stage crashers and immediately took control of what could have been a riotous moment in light of the raw emotions of the Black community and the tenuous relationship with the police. James Brown addresses the audience asking if he can finish the show, with the infamous words, "We are Black. Don't make us all look bad." He was asking for "respect from my own people." Video transcript: James Brown: First we got to pay our respect to the late, great late incomparable. Somebody we love very much. Somebody I have all the admiration in the world for I've got he chance to know him personal late great Mr. Martin Luther King. Cornel West: He was a lover of Martin Luther King Jr. This is James he is actually a patriot. He is a lover of America. You know what they call Martin America's best friend. Its one of the most powerful formulations of Martin in a way. James Brown: That I want to say this you know in the city I know that people who stayed home, who stayed on the street because it is a safe city. Marva Whitney: Everybody was tensed by Mr. Brown has a tough crew they were going to do their job but I mean you are human and you didn't know what was going to go off. Male Speaker: What must have been like for James Brown to go in that stage. I wonder if she was in fear of his life. This is the days before metal detectors. You can brought anything into that show. That was heroic for him to do that. Marva Whitney: If he was afraid you did not know. You didn't know it. He wouldn't let you see that. Male Speaker: I never meet anything like James Brown. I never saw anything like James Brown. Men he was a peace of work. Want more of Shout Factory's best picks? GO TO: *******www.shoutfactory****/ten Want more James Brown, go to Shout Factory: *******www.shoutfactory****/jamesbrown"
  • 15 Apr 2013
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0:50
James Brown. A clip from the documentary, "The Night James Brown Saved Boston", features James Brown singing "Baby Baby Baby" from "I Got the Feelin". The song was interspersed with film clips of performing at the Apollo Theater live in March 1968; Bobby Kennedy announcing his candidacy for president; President Lyndon Johnson declining the nomination for president for a second term; civil unrest and riots in response to the death of Dr. King; and civil rights marches. James Brown: Man to Man was a concert film recorded live at the Apollo Theater. It was broadcast as an hour-long syndicated television special and is one of the first color recordings of James Brown. Released as a single in 1968, "I Got a Feelin" reached #1 on the R&B chart and #6 on the pop chart. The Jackson 5 auditioned for Motown founder Berry Gordy in 1968 with a filmed performance of "I Got the Feelin'" with Michael Jackson at age 10 closely mimicking James Brown's vocal style and dance moves. Video transcript: James Brown: Baby, baby, baby, baby, baby, baby, baby, baby I got the feeling baby. I got the feeling now. Sometimes I'm up. Sometimes I'm down, down. My heart... Robert F. Kennedy: I'm announcing today my candidacy of the presidency of the United States. Presidential Candidate: Yeah baby, alright. Oww good God. Uh ah. Presidential Candidate: I shall not sit and I will not accept the nomination of my party for another term as your president. James: Alright. Baby, baby, baby, baby, baby, baby, baby, baby, baby, baby, baby. Want more of Shout Factory's best picks? GO TO: *******www.shoutfactory****/ten Want more James Brown, go to Shout Factory: *******www.shoutfactory****/jamesbrown"
  • 15 Apr 2013
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1:46
James Brown. A clip from the documentary, "The Night James Brown Saved Boston", features interviews about the live concert at the Boston Garden, April 5, 1968. In the aftermath of Martin Luther King Jr.'s assassination by James Earl Ray on April 4, 1968, rioting broke out in cities across the country. James Brown had been scheduled to perform at the Boston Garden on April 5th. Boston Mayor Kevin White had initially wanted to cancel all public events, including James Brown's show. As there was concern that the cancellation of the show might cause an escalation of the crisis. it was agreed that James Brown's show would go on. The show, one of the greatest in Boston's history, went on and the city of Boston remained relatively calm. James Brown consoled his mourning audience, dedicated the show to the memory of Dr. King and was instrumental in keeping the peace on the streets of Boston. Video transcript: Newscaster: Washington, Chicago, Detroit, Boston, New York, these are just few of the cities in what's the Negro anguish over Dr. King's murder presumably by a white man expressed their self in violent destruction. [Instrumental Music] Male Speaker: As dawn broke on April 5th, American cities were assessing the damage embracing for a weekend of full scale riding. [Instrumental Music] Richard Flavin: They tend to forget about it. This was a time of tremendous crisis and everyone understood it that this iconic figure had been gone down and so everyone understood that this was beyond politics and it was beyond personal ambition and it was an attempt to keep the city whole. James "Early" Byrd: We got to get hip. We got to get hip to the job as we say. You got to know what's going on your city. Male Speaker: He didn't know James Brown from James town but what he did understand was that James Brown had a whole segment of the community which at that moment was angered, disfranchised. Tom Atkins: And so Kevin now was thinking of how he could use James Brown to help solve his problem of trying to get through a weekend without having the city go war. Dr. Cornel West: And he see this all the time that right when the crisis hits the white community, things will get serious. Crises to black communities just normal, catastrophic circumstances in black America turn away, went invisible. Catastrophic circumstances in white America, now they are serious probably we gotta do something. Now let's talk about James Brown and all these other people who really talk about healing Want more of Shout Factory's best picks? GO TO: *******www.shoutfactory****/ten Want more James Brown, go to Shout Factory: *******www.shoutfactory****/jamesbrown"
  • 15 Apr 2013
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1:15
James Brown. A clip from the documentary, "The Night James Brown Saved Boston", features James Brown's pleas to the public to stop the violence after Martin Luther King Jr.'s murder. Civil Rights activist Rev. Al Sharpton explains that James Brown felt it was disrespectful for the Black community to respond with violence to Dr. King's death, a man who preached nonviolence. Video transcript: James Brown: Education is asset. Know what you're talking about. Be qualified, be ready, then you'll have a problem, be ready, know what you're doing. You know in Augusta, Georgia I used to shine shoes on the steps of radio station WRDW but today I own that radio station. You know what that is? That's black power. It's not in violence. It's in knowing what you're talking about, being ready. Now I say it to you because I'm your brother. I know what's in, I've been there. I'm not talking from imagination I'm talking from my experience. Let's live our country, let's live ourselves. Please get off the street. Rev. Al Sharpton: The reason that he went on the line in Boston and another's cities when King died is because, one he thought it was self-destructive but two he said this is disrespecting with this man believe. It was almost like whether I believe in nonviolence or not. You can't scar this man's memory and that was what -- was a motivating force for him is don't associate violence with this man who tried so hard to be nonviolent. Want more of Shout Factory's best picks? GO TO: *******www.shoutfactory****/ten Want more James Brown, go to Shout Factory: *******www.shoutfactory****/jamesbrown"
  • 15 Apr 2013
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3:55
James Brown. A clip from the documentary, "The Night James Brown Saved Boston", features part of his live performance at the Apollo Theater in New York City, March 1968. James Brown discusses with the audience being a black man in the Black community. He further reflects on Black America and walking through condemned housing in Harlem. James Brown felt his fight was against the past and his fight became for Black America to become 'The America". James Brown: Man to Man was a concert film recorded live at the Apollo Theater. It was broadcast as an hour-long syndicated television special and is one of the first color recordings of James Brown. Video transcript: James Brown: Around the country I've been doing a lot of things and I wanna bring out some of the things because I want you to know that I'm more than just an artist, the man who sing and dance and scream or something on the stage. I want you to know that I'm a man, a black man, a soul brother. [Audience Applause] James Brown: I was walking by the day when we found a car standing there but I was looking out. I guess I'm really concern about people. Overlook in the city, overlook [inaudible 0:00:32] and I've seen all the torn beyond I want to say that. Shadowville is a place that has had tall buildings, buildings that are still standing, still standing that should be removed. Do you know who lived there? The black people. What I would do I would visit everyday and they wouldn't stay long. [Inaudible 0:00:56] and then go back to one of their friends. Everybody wants to feel they're important and I think this is the main thing because that no one else [inaudible 0:01:04] I wanna be some type of movie actor, sports pitcher what it was. I just wanna be and then all of sudden I wanna be a tall guy. Now I wanna be a cowboy, you know you want to be anything that's important. I want to watch and find a lot of people standing in an area that they have nothing to offer. I went from black America then I start talking to the white America and I was saying these are the things that has to be done and this is the area that you have to go in who've got goods to need people. Now we gotta go to the people that not even surviving. I [inaudible 0:01:48] about a year and half later. I see new houses and watch and I saw hers dress better. I saw a community that turn around from one thing and went directly to another thing that made me feel good. I was walking in front of condemned, I guess it was condemned partly because of [inaudible 0:02:19] or something that was gonna do to someone that's out in the street because there are some outside the street always and no one give a list out of this. Everybody gotta be out of here because here were some houses and could be renovated and went really out of sight [inaudible 0:02:34]. That was a part [inaudible 0:02:38] know the answer to all these things. You know in Washington I remember walking on the street with this elderly lady and you know, she was getting so much good feeling, good will, so and really, you know, start to involve and moving and getting all over you because she stayed right with me. She knows what [inaudible 0:03:03]. She was getting something for me. I think that she wanted from her son. I made a grandson and through me she was getting that love and attention but what she don't know was to her I was getting the same thing. Yeah more broken black families on a percentage any other race in the world and there's gotta be a reason because we need education [inaudible 0:03:30]. Materially I was poor. I'm still poor and my fight just started and my fight against the past, the old colored man. My fight is I guess that my fight is for the black America become America. Want more of Shout Factory's best picks? GO TO: *******www.shoutfactory****/ten Want more James Brown, go to Shout Factory: *******www.shoutfactory****/jamesbrown"
  • 15 Apr 2013
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2:40
James Brown performs "There Was A Time"--Live at the Apollo Theater in New York City, March 1968. James Brown: Man to Man was a concert film recorded live at the Apollo Theater. It was broadcast as an hour-long syndicated television special and is one of the first color recordings of James Brown. "There Was a Time" was written by James Brown and recorded in July 1967 during a live performance at the Apollo Theater in a medley with "Let Yourself Go" and "I Feel All Right", and was first released November 1967 in edited form as the B-side of the single "I Can't Stand Myself (When You Touch Me)". The song charted #3 R&B and #36 Pop. Video transcript: [Instrumental Music] James Brown: Don't guess why over what you're doing. Don't guess why baby over what you're doing. If I keep loving you my life would be ruined. I tell you, I'm hip on your running round Good God, hip to your running round but do you know one thing I'm gonna put you down. Oh, get it together. Get it together. Get it together. Get it together. Brand new bag baby, you said you want, give me a brand new bag but you, you were just jiving. You wanted a drag. You ducked out of school baby before you got it down. Do you hear me? You ducked out of school before you got it down. Now you ain't hip. You're the biggest fool in town. Oh, get it together. Get it together. Get it together. Get it together. Get it together. [Instrumental Music] James Brown: I wanna do. Let me tell about this a little bit. Let me tell about this little bit. You may dance good. You may have fast feet. You may dance good. You may have fast feet. But no. You may have fast feet but you ain't hip. Your business is in the street. Maceo, I want you to blow now the car. Come on, come on. Oh come on. All right now I'm ready. I'm ready. I'm ready. Sit down, sit down, sit down, sit down, sit down, sit down, sit down. Don't play so much. Don't be so mean, no. Want more of Shout Factory's best picks? GO TO: *******www.shoutfactory****/ten Want more James Brown, go to Shout Factory: *******www.shoutfactory****/jamesbrown"
  • 15 Apr 2013
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4:44
James Brown performs "I Got the Feelin'" while engaging with the audience-- Live at the Apollo Theater in New York City, March, 1968. James Brown: Man to Man was a concert film recorded live at the Apollo Theater. It was broadcast as an hour-long syndicated television special and is one of the first color recordings of James Brown. Released as a single in 1968, "I Got the Feelin" reached #1 on the R&B chart and #6 on the pop chart. The Jackson 5 auditioned for Motown founder Berry Gordy in 1968 with a filmed performance of "I Got the Feelin'" with Michael Jackson at age 10 closely mimicking James Brown's vocal style and dance moves. Video transcript: James Brown: Alright. [Instrumental Music] James Brown: Alright. Wait a minute. Is anybody right here got the feeling. Audience: Yeah. James Brown: You got the feeling. Audience: Yeah. James Brown: Alright get the melody in because you got to feel it right here. Thank you very much. Is everybody right here got the feeling? Audience: Yeah. James Brown: You got the feeling over there. Audience: Yeah. James Brown: Is everybody up there got the feeling? Audience: Yeah. James Brown: You got the feeling up there? Audience: Yeah. James Brown: You got the feeling up there? Audience: Yeah. James Brown: Well let me hear you say a little bit louder. Get in to it. You got the feeling? Audience: Yeah. James Brown: Wait a minute. Let's check with the band here. Now fellows, you got the feeling? Band: Yeah. James Brown: You got the feeling? Band: Yeah. James Brown: The band didn't got it. Do you got the feeling, what do you say you guys? You got the feeling? You got the feeling over there Jimmy. You got the feel those. You got the feeling about your ladies. Mr. Jones you got the feeling. Yeah because you got the feeling. Yeah I'm hip. You got the feeling? Yeah. Good. Wait a minute. You stand up here uh. Wait a minute with your best. Wait a minute. Fellows, you got to feel it one more time. There you got the feeling. Audience: Yeah. James Brown: Alright. Whatever. I'm getting better now. Are you ready? You're ready. Audience: Yeah. James Brown: If you're ready I'm going for myself. Are you ready? Audience: Yeah. James Brown: Come on now. Ah ah ah I got the feeling. Baby, baby. I got the feeling now. You don't know what you do to me. People are heavy. I'm down in misery. Hey, baby, good, alright. I got the feeling, alright, baby, baby, baby, baby, baby, baby, baby, baby, baby, baby, baby. I got the feeling, baby. I got the feeling now. Sometimes I'm up. Sometimes I'm down. My heart, I'm around the town. I'm level oh baby, alright oww, good God. You don't mean it now, alright baby, baby, baby, baby, baby, baby, baby, baby, baby baby, baby. I got the feeling baby. You got the feeling now. Oh yeah. Sometimes I roam. I'll be back home. Sometimes I seem to be fly. I just don't know when to say bye bye yeah baby. Alright come on. Hey you don't mean it now. Alright, baby, baby, baby, baby, baby, baby, baby, baby, baby, baby baby, baby come on now. [Instrumental Music] James Brown: Yeah baby. Alright. Keep going. I tell you I don't need it now. Alright. Baby, baby, baby, baby, baby, baby, baby, baby, baby. Want more of Shout Factory's best picks? GO TO: *******www.shoutfactory****/ten Want more James Brown, go to Shout Factory: *******www.shoutfactory****/jamesbrown"
  • 15 Apr 2013
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2:43
James Brown performs "Try Me"--Live at the Apollo Theater in New York City, March 1968. James Brown: Man to Man was a concert film recorded live at the Apollo Theater. It was broadcast as an hour-long syndicated television special and is one of the first color recordings of James Brown. James Brown's first #1 hit, "Try Me," was released in 1958. It is the best-selling R&B single of 1958 and the first of 17 chart-topping R&B singles by Brown over the next two decades. James Brown recorded an instrumental version of "Try Me" for the Smash label in 1965 which charted #34 R&B and #63 Pop in the U.S. It was one of the few times in American music history that a song became a hit on two separate occasions in vocal and instrumental form by the same artist. Video transcript: James Brown: Try me. Try me. Darlin tell me I need you. Try me. Back Up Singers: Try me. James Brown: Try me. Back Up Singers: Try me. James Brown: And your love will always be true. Oh I need you. Back Up Singers: I need you. James Brown: Oh now hold me. Back Up Singers: Hold me. James Brown: Hold me. Back Up Singers: Hold me. James Brown: I want you right here by my side. Hold me. Back Up Singers: Hold me. James Brown: Hold me. Back Up Singers: Hold me. James Brown: And your love oh darling we won't hide. I need you. Back Up Singers: I need you. James Brown: Oh i need you. What should I do now? [Instrumental Music] James Brown: Oh I need you. Back Up Singers: I need you. James Brown: Oh oh walk with me. Back Up Singers: Walk with me. James Brown: Talk with me. Back Up Singers: Talk with me. James Brown: I want you to stop my stop my heart from crying. Walk with me. Back Up Singers: Walk with me. James Brown: Oh Talk with me. Back Up Singers: Talk with me. James Brown: And your love will stop my heart from dying. Oh I need you. Back Up Singers: I need you hoo hoo. Want more of Shout Factory's best picks? GO TO: *******www.shoutfactory****/ten Want more James Brown, go to Shout Factory: *******www.shoutfactory****/jamesbrown"
  • 15 Apr 2013
  • 429
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1:10
James Brown. A clip from the documentary, "The Night James Brown Saved Boston", features Civil Rights activist Rev. Al Sharpton talking about the similarities and differences between James Brown and Dr. King. James Brown respected Martin Luther King, Jr. even when they disagreed. Video transcript: [Instrumental Music] James Brown: Can't stand it, alright. Can't stand it good God. I can't stand your love good God. I can't stand it baby, can't stand your love, alright. You don't love nobody else. Get back, I can't stand myself. Can't stand it good God. Can't stand it, alright. Baby what you want me to do? Baby, what you want me to do? You made me, made me love you. You give me fever, my body's wet uh. You give me fever, my body so wet. Fever alright uh. Fever good God. Time to talk and time to sweat and time to rain so hard oww. Can't stand it good God. Yeah, yeah, yeah, yeah. Ooww. Can't stand it baby. Good God. Baby oh yeah. Baby oh yeah. Can't get it right oww. [Instrumental Music] James Brown: Oww. Good God. Come on now. [Inaudible 0:01:58]. Eh eh. Yeah! [Instrumental Music] James Brown: Ah yay! Ahh hey! Ah hay. Can't stand your love. I want your love, love, love, love, love, love, love, love, love. I wanna, I wanna, I wanna, I want your love, love, love, love, love, love, love. [Instrumental Music] James Brown: Come on we did the show ladies and gentlemen. Did the show. Did the show. We did the show. Thank God. Do reach my hands like I'm in a show baby. Young man don't cry. Want more of Shout Factory's best picks? GO TO: *******www.shoutfactory****/ten Want more James Brown, go to Shout Factory: *******www.shoutfactory****/jamesbrown"
  • 15 Apr 2013
  • 411
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1:26
James Brown. A clip from the documentary, "The Night James Brown Saved Boston", features Civil Rights activist Rev. Al Sharpton discussing how James Brown managed to connect with people and his motivation for performing the night after Martin Luther King Jr.'s murder. In the aftermath of Martin Luther King Jr.'s assassination by James Earl Ray on April 4, 1968, rioting broke out in cities across the country. James Brown had been scheduled to perform at the Boston Garden on April 5th. Boston Mayor Kevin White had initially wanted to cancel all public events, including James Brown's show. As there was concern that the cancellation of the show might cause an escalation of the crisis. it was agreed that James Brown's show would go on. The show, one of the greatest in Boston's history, went on and the city of Boston remained relatively calm. James Brown consoled his mourning audience, dedicated the show to the memory of Dr. King and was instrumental in keeping the peace on the streets of Boston. Video transcript: Rev. Al Sharpton: It was only one man that could make America stand still and think and that was the man who didn't have a PhD for Boston University like Dr. King did. He wasn't a proponent of nonviolence. He never got a nobel prize but he was a man that knew how to express the grievances and the screams and they feel it of a whole people and because people say he feels like us, we want to at least give him the benefit of a doubt and hear what he's got to say because if anybody understands what we feel tonight is James Brown. James Brown: Yeah. Good God. Rev. Al Sharpton: He knew that he was taking their anger and their fury and channel again to a show business performance. James Brown: Yeah! Rev. Al Sharpton: But he also made the choice that that was the only thing he could do to show respect that Dr. King and save peoples lives that night. So even though there was those that criticize him of trivia lies in this to a show. He understood that it made me a trivial way of saving lives and preserve Dr. King's legacy. James Brown: Now, now, now, now, now, now, now ahh! Rev. Al Sharpton: But I agree he did it. He did it and you can argue the means and the technique but you can't argue the results. James Brown: Come on we did the show ladies and gentlemen. Want more of Shout Factory's best picks? GO TO: *******www.shoutfactory****/ten Want more James Brown, go to Shout Factory: *******www.shoutfactory****/jamesbrown"
  • 15 Apr 2013
  • 240
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