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4:59
EVO 40GX converted to run on CH Ignitions cdi or Rcexl with CH Unique Universal design Sensor holder that fits all engines from 26 - 80 GX/GT and More
20 Sep 2017
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4:47
Trapped Snake Thanks It's Rescuers With A Surprise!
23 Sep 2017
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0:57
Cute baby playing with Cats
24 Sep 2017
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2:57
How to Become Pregnant With HPV|cervical cancer infertility Human Papillomavirus, or HPV, is a virus that primarily affects the genital area. There are over 100 different types of HPV, and at least 13 of those strains cause cancer. Two strains in particular - HPV types 16 and 18 - are responsible for roughly 70% of cervical cancer cases worldwide.[1] In most cases, HPV will clear up on its own using your own body's defenses, but some people develop complications like genital warts or cancer if the virus is left untreated.[2] If you are considering pregnancy and know that you have HPV, you may have concerns about becoming pregnant or passing the virus to your baby. Having HPV does not typically affect a woman's ability to conceive or to have a safe pregnancy and a healthy baby
24 Sep 2017
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3:31
How to Deal with an Abnormal Pap Smear|what can make a pap smear abnormal Doctors regularly perform Pap smears (also called Pap tests) on female patients, typically during routine pelvic exams, in order to check for abnormal cell changes on the cervix. If untreated, these cell changes can sometimes lead to cervical cancer. “Negative” or “normal” results mean that no abnormal cervical cells are present and no follow-up is necessary until your next regularly scheduled exam. “Positive” or “abnormal” results, however, indicate a potential problem.
24 Sep 2017
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2:34
How to Cope with Having Chemo Brain|memory cancer After having chemotherapy, many cancer patients report feeling brain fog or cloudiness that makes it difficult to complete everyday tasks such as remembering common words, multitasking, or concentrating. This fog in thinking has many medical names including cancer treatment-related cognitive impairment or post-chemotherapy cognitive impairment.[1] It is also known simply as chemo brain. A few small adjustments to your daily life can help you handle this condition
24 Sep 2017
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1:08
LA The Rover Press Junket Robert Pattinson interview with VH1
24 Sep 2017
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4:18
How to Deal With Stage 3 Colon Cancer|colorectal cancer survival by stage It is best to treat colon cancer, also known as colorectal cancer, in its early stages. There are 5 stages of colon cancer, ranging from 0 to 4. Stage 3, Dukes C colon cancer, is one of the more advanced stages. In it, tumors have spread beyond the colon to the lymph nodes. Stage 3 is divided into 3 subgroups. These subgroups range from least to most advanced with a survival rate ranging from 44 to 83 percent. Your doctor and cancer team will explain what this stage means, answer questions, provide treatment options and help you determine which plan will work best for you. 1 Deal with stage 3 colon cancer in steps. Try not to get ahead of yourself by looking at the entire picture. 2 Admit that you are sick. This is the first step in accepting and coping with a diagnosis of stage 3 colon cancer. It takes time to process this information and the new emotions you're feeling. You may become a little overwhelmed, frightened or anxious. These are normal feelings, so allow yourself a little time.
26 Sep 2017
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3:32
How to Support Someone Diagnosed With Cancer|what to say to someone with cancer A cancer diagnosis is a devastating moment in someone's life. When someone you know is diagnosed with cancer, it can come as a shock. It's normal to feel very emotional, and even angry. Once you have begun to process the news, you can start thinking about how to help your friend. There are many things you can do to support someone diagnosed with cancer. You can demonstrate how much you care through your words and actions. It's a difficult situation, but you can make a big difference in your friend's life by being supportive. 1 Learn about the diagnosis. Cancer is complex, and every individual has a different case. To help your friend, you need to learn about your friend's particular type of cancer. If she's not up to talking about it, do some research on your own. You can get information from your doctor or local hospital.[9] Learn to speak the language. For example, cancer is diagnosed in stages. Find out whether your friend is Stage 1 (non-invasive) or Stage 4 (invasive and most advanced).
26 Sep 2017
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3:21
what to say to someone recently diagnosed with cancer |Write to Someone Who Has Been Diagnosed If someone you know has been diagnosed with cancer, it can very hard to know what to say or how to express yourself. You will want to show concern, as well as expressing your support and encouragement. Writing a letter can be a good way to approach this, as you will have time to carefully choose your words. The tone of the letter will depend on your relationship but aim for a letter that expresses how you feel directly and clearly. 1 Say something. When someone you know is diagnosed with cancer, you might feel completely numb or unable to process the situation. It is perfectly normal to be sad and upset about the situation, and not know what to do, but it’s important that you don’t drift away from your friend. Even if you don’t know what to say or how to react, make an effort to reach out and show your friend that you are there. Just sending a short note or email at first saying you have heard the news and are thinking of them can help your friend feel a bit less alone.[1] You could say, “I’m sorry this has happened. I’m thinking of you.”[2] If you don’t know what to say, it’s okay to admit this. Say “I’m not sure what to say, but I want you to know that I care and I’m here for you.
26 Sep 2017
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2:35
Ajaz Khan Celebrating His Brithday With Kids
26 Sep 2017
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0:46
Cat fights with pigeon |Whatsapp Video
26 Sep 2017
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