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3:02
O O IT'S on.This video is a tribute to the street fighting legend Kimbo Slice. This video has most of his Street fights and ALL of his professional mixed martial arts fights including his trainig! Kimbo Slice vs. Ray Mercer, Kimbo Slice vs. Bo Cantrell, Kimbo Slice vs. Tank Abbot and Kimbo Slice vs. James Thompson!,charles berkley,kenny smith,football,lakers,kobe bryant,shaq,kevin garnett,you all should watch out.
22 Aug 2008
59981
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2:51
Hi, I'm Grant Abbott. I'm principal of SMSF Strategies and also chairman of the Australian SMSF Member's Association. Today I want to talk to you about property, but I want to talk about negative gearing. Now most of you think you know negative gearing really well. You know, where you actually get excess deductions either through capital allowance or through depreciation, or alternatively just making sure you've got your interest deductions. All of those piled up at the end of the year exceed, effectively, your income from that property and that can be then offset against salary wages or business income. Now that all sounds very well, but that is so old-school. That is prehistoric, like pre-2000. These days what we do, is we actually negatively gear inside our self-managed super fund. Let me say that again, negatively gear inside your self-managed super fund. So what we do is we set up the self-managed super fund, the holding trust. See some of my other videos on how to set one of these things up. But what we do is we want to make sure that we get these interest deductions, capital allowances and depreciation to throw that superannuation fund into a tax loss. Now what are we going to do with the tax loss inside that fund? Here's the deal; what we're going to do is offset contributions tax. You see when you salary sacrifice from your employer, or if you're a small business owner, you put money into super and get a tax deduction outside, that money goes inside the fund, and there's no such thing as contributions tax that goes inside the fund, is assessable income. That assessable income can then be reduced by those negative gearing deductions. That means we don't pay 15% tax on our contributions, we may in fact pay 5%. Whereas if we've got enough negative gearing, we can even go down further; get an (01:43) property, you won't have any contributions tax at all. Now here's the big deal. We negatively gear in super, but you think about what happens outside of super. You negatively gear, when you sell that property you're up for capital gains tax. The smart people know that you negatively gear inside super and then you sell once you reach age 55 or beyond. Remember, sometimes I've said, you've got to keep these until age 75. And why do we wait until beyond, because at that point in time we want that property without any gearing, we want it inside the pension side of the fund, and the beautiful thing about that, is that when you sell it, guess how much tax we have to pay? Nothing. And when we distribute it down to members, when we live on it as either a pension or we take it as a lump sum out of that pension account, guess how much tax we pay if we're over age 60? Zero. So we have the beauty of negative gearing and a capital gains tax exemption. That means hundreds of thousands of potential dollars in your pocket for your family's wealth over a period of time. Anyway, that's Grant Abbot signing off with my best strategy ever, negative gearing inside a self-managed super fund. Go to http://www.smsfstrategies.com for all videos and borrowing documents
9 Apr 2012
18381
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0:50
wushu praying mantis boxing. enjoy Coaching * Workshop * Show * Training ...for more information about david trk and the berlin wushu team please visit the following sites: www.david-toeroek.de www.berlin-wushu-team.com www.myspace.com/davidtoeroek www.myspace.com/wushuteamberlin Wang Lang (the style creator) was born in the Tsi Mo district, in Shantung Province. He lived during the Ming Dynasty fall and as he was a patriot (some Masters say he was uncle of the last Ming Emperor), he decided to excel in the martial arts to fight against the Ching Dynasty (Manchurian rulers). He entered to the Shaolin monastery in Sung Shang, but being prosecuted by the Manchurians he travelled all over China, training in places places where he could find Kung Fu Masters. In this way he learned 17 Chinese Boxing styles. After this travel, Wang Lang entered to the Lao Shan monastery. Once there, he was always defeated by the abbot of the temple in spite of his deep knowledge of the fighting arts. One day, while he was meditating in a forest he saw a combat between a praying mantis and a cicada. He was impressed by the aggressive attitude of the mantis and he started studying its movements. After a long learning time he combined the praying mantis hand movements with the monkey steps (to enhance the coordination between hand and feet). With this new style Wang Lang could defeat the monastery abbot. Wang Lang went on modifying his system and when he felt satisfied with his creation he accepted some disciples.
6 Aug 2008
3623
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4:15
Requested by my very good friend WithMyLittleSpoon.... a very nice and meaningful song from Dido... pls. enjoy!!~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~Dido Florian Cloud de Bounevialle O'Malley Armstrong (born 25 December 1971 in London, England) professionally known as Dido (pronounced /dado/ DYE-doe) is an English singer-songwriter.Dido was born Florian Cloud de Bounevialle Armstrong at St. Mary Abbots hospital in Kensington, London on Christmas Day 1971. Because she was born on Christmas Day, she also celebrates an "official birthday" on 25 June, following the example of Paddington Bear. Her mother, Clare (ne Collins) is a French poet and her father, William O'Malley Armstrong was an Irish publisher and former managing director of Sidgwick & Jackson. She has an older brother, Rowland Constantine O'Malley Armstrong[8] who is better known as record producer Rollo. Despite their impressive birth names, the pair were known from childhood by the names that are famous now Dido and Rollo. Dido has made it clear that "Dido" is now her real name and not simply a stage name or nickname.Dido was named after the mythical Queen of Carthage. As a child, she had to deal with the ambiguous and unusual nature of her name, which led to her being bullied and even to her pretending to have an ordinary name. As she explains:To be called one thing and christened another is actually very confusing and annoying. It's one of the most irritating things that my parents did to me. ...Florian is a German man's name. That's just mean. To give your child a whole lot of odd names. They were all so embarrassing. ...I thought it was cruel to call me Dido and then expect me to just deal with it.Dido, Interview published in The Observer in 2001Dido was educated at Thornhill Primary, Dallington, City of London Girls' and Westminster School. After she stole a recorder from school at age five, her parents enrolled her at the Guildhall School of Music in London, England. By the time she reached her teens Dido had learned to play the piano, recorder and the violin. She later studied law at Birkbeck, University of London, while working as a literary agent. She never completed the degree, deciding instead to take up music full-time. After learning the guitar, she showcased her skills to audiences during her 2004 Life for Rent tour.
4 Jun 2010
2352
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6:02
The famous Italian lover Casanova is portrayed by Claudio De Kunert as a child and by Leonardo Whiting as an adolescent on the verge of manhood. Planning to help the poor by going into religious law, he quickly is smitten by a bevy of beauties and by Millescudi (Senta Berger) in particular. After his first sermon as an aspiring abbot, the collection plate is flooded with love letters to the handsome young man. Casanova soon abandons his religious pursuits for more worldly pleasures. The gravely voiced Lionel Stander and Wilfred Brambell also appear in this 2 million dollar production. Fiorenzo Carpi De Resmini, born in Milan, completed his studies in composition at the Conservatorio di Musica “Giuseppe Verdi” di Milano. Carpi met Giorgio Strehler shortly after World War II and began working at Piccolo Teatro in 1947, where he composed music for over 120 productions, including Goldoni’s Arlecchino and Il campiello, Shakespeare’s The Tempest, Pirandello’s Giants of the Mountain, Chekhov’s The Cherry Orchard, Marivaux’s Island of the Slaves, and Goethe’s Faust. He also worked with theater directors Vittorio Caprioli, Dario Fo, Vittorio Gassman, and Eduardo De Filippo, as well as with various film directors, including Louis Malle, Peter Del Monte, Tinto Brass, and Patrice Chéreau. He composed the soundtrack of Luigi Comencini’s classic “Giacomo Casanova: Childhood And Adolescence”.
12 Jul 2012
1856
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2:00
Now on iTunes: itunes.com/movies/poirotthemurderofrogerackroyd Living quietly in the small village of King's Abbot, sleuth Hercule Poirot becomes involved in the murder of successful industrialist Roger Ackroyd.
13 Aug 2009
1359
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1:13
This 2 mons. old baby can put up he fist on que and defend himself and mommy.Look out kimbo slice fights,ufc,tank abbot,cop,ken shamrock,michael phelps,tito ortiz,kwame,sean gannon butter bean,kobe bryant,shaq,nfl,john maddan nfl 09,black borat,obama,mccain,kimbo vs 2mon baby,When he first did this I was laughing,I think some day he will become a fighter,not a street fighter but a pro.I will keep him in school and tell he to always believe in god.
27 Sep 2008
1185
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1:29
They're the Zuiikin gals of "Zuiikin English," a Japanese TV show where viewers learn how to speak English. Not sure why they don't stick to the basics, like "Hello, how are you?" But apparently, "I have a bad case of diarrhea" is an important thing to know. And I'm not sure what the "P-Low the Skillful Abbot" is at the top, the little graphic there. But it's all very strange. "What Were They Thinking?" And some poor tourist is going to come up to you on the street, by the way, and say, "I have a bad case of diarrhea." And you'll just laugh. Anderson Cooper and Erica Hill find a few more creative ways the Japanese learn English.
7 Sep 2009
1205
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1:40
Sam, Nick and Robert are cast as a gay fashion designer, a horny soul brother, and an incompetent impressionist respectively. The three escape their mental asylum and sexually assault their way into a girl's school. The entire female cast comprises softcore porn models who don skimpy karate costumes and violently turn the tables on their tormentors. Another quality movie from Viethen Production$.
16 Jul 2007
1022
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3:55
In this globalized world the borders has been erased long time ago, but the miracle of cooperation between artists from distant countries still is a surprise. In the particular case of Enlighted the surprise is not because of the fact itself or the names of the musicians involved, but yes because of the unusual way with which music found naturally its course. Rodrigo Gudiña (guitars) and Guillermo DeMedio (keyboards) were some years ago, the core of Ariadna Project, a band with professional approach and high aims, not very common in the argentinean scene. Their song "Y Las Sombras Quedarán Atrás" ("The Shadows Will Remain Behind") was selected to be included in the first solo album of Adrian Barilari, the most renouned metal singer in Argentina. This song was recorded by Barilari along with Jens Johansson (Stratovarius), Emppu Vuorinen, Jukka Nevalainen and Sami Vänskä (Nightwish) and it opened the doors to new oportunities. At the beggining of 2009 they got in touch with the swedish singer Thomas Vikström, (very well known by his work with acts like Therion, Candlemass or Brazen Abbot) in one of his visits to the country and inmediatly the seed of Enlighted was sown and it germinated with the participation of Pit Barrett (bass) and Alan Fritzler (drums). Although its planted on the most hard and melodic ground nowadays, the first blossom of Enlighted avoids to be labeled and it is a good way to show in advance great things to come for their full album in 2010. The EP "Time to Fly" is now available to be downloaded for free at www.dontpaymusic.com along with its original artwork, including 3 original songs and in addition the Swedish version of the title track, as befits a project which is proudly cosmopolitan. It's time to fly, so get ready to be enlightened. Download Now Enlighted Time to Fly EP 100% FREE at: http://www.dontpaymusic.com/enlighted --------------------------------------------------------- The Secret (Lyrics) The past days had faded into Confusion and pain Lying awake I wonder What happened to all my dreams. Searching higher always been denied Smashing my dreams to the ground Burning higher I can feel the fire And now there is no turning back. My eyes are now opened to see the answers are coming to me Raise my head and start again No limits to go if we dare to fly When you know the power inside you mind You're ready to find the secret within you. The gates of your thoughts are opened To a new life of dreams Shining brighter your mind has the power To change your world as you live Hold on tighter to what you desire Your dreams, they will set yourself free.
14 Apr 2010
639
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3:27
In this globalized world the borders has been erased long time ago, but the miracle of cooperation between artists from distant countries still is a surprise. In the particular case of Enlighted the surprise is not because of the fact itself or the names of the musicians involved, but yes because of the unusual way with which music found naturally its way. Rodrigo Gudiña (guitars) and Guillermo DeMedio (keyboards) were some years ago, the core of Ariadna Project, a band with professional approach and high aims, not very common in the argentinean scene. Their song "Y Las Sombras Quedarán Atrás" ("The Shadows Will Remain Behind") was selected to be included in the first solo album of Adrian Barilari, the most renouned metal singer in Argentina. This song was recorded by Barilari along with Jens Johansson (Stratovarius), Emppu Vuorinen, Jukka Nevalainen and Sami Vänska (Nightwish) and it opened the doors to new oportunities. At the beginning of 2009 they got in touch with the Swedish singer Thomas Vikström, (very well known by his work with acts like Therion, Candlemass or Brazen Abbot) in one of his visits to the country and inmediatly the seed of Enlighted was sown and it germinated with the participation of Pit Barrett (bass) and Alan Fritzler (drums). Although its planted on the most hard and melodic ground nowadays, the first blossom of this project avoids to be labeled and it is a good way to show in advance great things to come for their full album in 2010. The EP "Time to Fly" includes 3 original songs and in addition the swedish version of the title track , a truly cosmopolitan band. It's time to fly, so get ready to be enlightened. Time to Fly EP it's available for free download worldwide at: http://www.dontpaymusic.com/enlighted
21 Apr 2011
532
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27:44
http://SupremeMasterTV.com – Buddhist Temples in Central Âu Lạc (Vietnam):Từ Đàm Pagoda, Tà Cú Temple, & Linh Phong Monastery (In Aulacese). Episode: 1755, Air Date: 5 July 2011. Today’s A Journey through Aesthetic Realms will be presented in Aulacese (Vietnamese), with subtitles in Arabic, Chinese, English, French, German, Hungarian, Indonesian, Hungarian, Indonesian, Italian, Japanese, Korean, Mongolian, Persian, Portuguese, Persian, Portuguese, Russian and Spanish. The Unsurpassed Dharma King is matchless throughout the three realms and beyond Teacher of gods and humans. Remember that Âu Lạc is a holy land. Do you see the map? Does it look like an “S”? Do you see the Tao symbol? It has a circle with the letter “S” in the middle; one side is white with a black dot and the other black with a white dot. These are called yin and yang. Âu Lạc looks like that. By looking at the geography, one can tell that it’s a sacred land with extraordinary people. Âu Lạc (Vietnam) is a country in Southeast Asia with a history of over 4,000 years of civilization. Since ancient times, the sacred and beautiful land of the descendants of the Dragon King and Fairy Princess has been the birthplace of many enlightened spiritual practitioners such as the Sixth Patriarch Hui Neng, Great Master Khuông Việt, Zen Master Vạn Hạnh, Zen Master Mãn Giác, Lý Era’s National Teacher Nguyễn Minh Không, Zen Master Từ Đạo Hạnh, Grand Master Tuệ Trung, Zen Master Huyền Quang, Zen Master Pháp Loa, Trúc Lâm First Patriarch Trần Nhân Tông, Zen Master Vũ Khắc Minh, and Zen Master Vũ Khắc Trường. In modern times, Âu Lạc has been graced by Buddha Master Tây An, founder of the Bửu Sơn Kỳ Hương Order; Master Ngô Minh Chiêu, founder of the Cao Đài religion; Master Nguyễn Thành Nam, founder of Đạo Dừa; Master Huỳnh Phú Sổ, founder of Hòa Hảo Buddhism; First Master Minh Đăng Quang, founder of the Sangha Bhikshu Buddhist Association; and more recently, Supreme Master Ching Hai, a world-renowned spiritual teacher who imparts the Quan Yin Method – all were born on this holy land. Buddhism, around 300 BCE, under the reign of King Hùng III, was introduced to Âu Lạc from India. Since then Âu Lạc has been graced by the presence of many venerable monks and nuns. Among them were great sages who contributed immensely to the nation’s development And worked tirelessly to disseminate Truth teachings. The ancestors of Buddhism were great Zen masters. When you go home, read the book “Vietnamese Zen Masters,” written by the Venerable Thích Thanh Từ. You will learn how the Aulacese (Vietnamese) of the past practiced spiritually, who the great Zen Masters were, and how enlightened they were. In Âu Lạc, Buddhism reached its pinnacle in the Lý and Trần dynasties. An excerpt from “A Collection of Unusual Tales,” written by eminent scholar Nguyễn Dữ, describes: “Those initiated into monkhood or nunhood were as many as half of the general population. Pagodas were constructed, more than 10 in large villages, and about 5, 6 in small villages.” Pagodas can be found throughout the nation, from north to south. For instance, northern Âu Lạc has the One Pillar Pagoda, built around 1049; the Đậu Pagoda built in the 11th century; and Perfume Pagoda, built at the end of the 17th century. The Central region has Celestial Seal Pagoda, built in 1694; Từ Đàm Pagoda built at the end of the 17th century; and Heavenly Lady Pagoda, officially built in 1601. The Heavenly Lady Pagoda in the Complex of Huế Monuments was recognized by the United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization (UNESCO) in 1993 as a World Cultural Heritage site. Southern Âu Lạc has Sacred Mountain Cave Temple, built in the 18th century, Vĩnh Tràng Pagoda at the beginning of the 19th century, and Tây An Temple in the 19th century. From the early 20th century till now, Buddhism in Âu Lạc continues to flourish. According to statistical data by the Buddhist Sangha of Vietnam, the number of Buddhists taking refuge in the Three Jewels (Enlightened Master, Truth, Saintly Assembly) have reached nearly 45 million. The entire nation has over 44,000 monks and nuns, with more than 14,000 pagodas, temples and monasteries. The temple has become an endearing image closely connected to the life of the Aulacese people, who go to the temple to study profound Buddhist teachings, find inner peace, and be reminded of their ancestors’ virtues, as conveyed in the verses written by the Most Venerable Thích Mãn Giác: “The temple protects the spirit of the nation, It’s our ancestors’ way of life since time immemorial.” During a lecture at the Việt Nam Temple in Los Angeles, California, USA on March 24, 1991, Supreme Master Ching Hai expounded on the purpose and significance of a temple. A temple is an important place. Why is it important? It’s important not because it’s big but because it reminds everyone not to forget his or her spiritual aspiration. Therefore, a temple is a place for you to come to study Buddhism, to stand and walk more dignified. You must find the monks to study Truth teachings so that your mind develops further. But you must protect the temple. For example, if you’ve been going there for a long time, the temple would inevitably have wear and tear, so you should contribute your effort and material resources to upkeep it. First, the temple represents the long-standing culture of Âu Lạc (Vietnam); it represents a great religion in the world. Second, it’s there so that you can have a refuge for the spirit, and third, for our children to have a place to continue the virtuous traditions of the Aulacese (Vietnamese) people. We are deeply grateful to Supreme Master Ching Hai for her treasured words and boundless grace for the nation and the righteous and pious people of Âu Lạc. In a foreign land, I met you some years ago. Your nun’s robe, the color of faded brown, Both worldly life and renunciation uncertain. Born with a headstrong personality, In a female form, you endured controversy. I read the old verse with nostalgia – A cheerful line here, a line of grievance there. Each polished sentence Still quietly reflects your grace and elegance. When you passed on, who cried and who rejoiced? To whom could you explain the misjudgments and turmoil? Pray to the Three Jewels on the high abode May the Awakened Soul be saved from the world of sorrow! Beauty is often ill-fated; A poet’s hair turns gray before others’! Alas! Alas! At the Buddha’s altar, I lit a fragrant incense In reverence And prayed to Amitabha Buddha To take the kindhearted to the Western Land... Namo Buddha Namo Dharma (Teachings) Namo Sangha (Assembly of renunciates) Namo Quan Yin Bodhisattva Mahasattva! To take the kindhearted to the Western Land... Beauty is often ill-fated; A poet’s hair turns gray before others’! Alas! Alas! At the Buddha’s altar, I lit a fragrant incense In reverence And prayed to Amitabha Buddha To take the kindhearted to the Western Land... Namo Buddha Namo Dharma (Teachings) Namo Sangha (Assembly of renunciates) Namo Quan Yin Bodhisattva Mahasattva! To take the kindhearted to the Western Land... Namo Buddha Namo Dharma (Teachings) Namo Sangha (Assembly of renunciates) Namo Quan Yin Bodhisattva Mahasattva! To take the kindhearted to the Western Land... In today’s program, we invite you to visit Từ Đàm Pagoda, Tà Cú Temple, and Linh Phong Monastery, three famous and ancient Buddhist temples in central Âu Lạc (Vietnam). My homeland, central Âu Lạc Temple bell peals gently in the morn and evening Eternal sound imbued with our ancestral heroic spirit O majestic Từ Đàm Pagoda Where love sows the seed of enlightenment. Through many a storm, my Từ Đàm Pagoda remains... The gentle melody of the song “Từ Đàm, My Homeland” by composer Nguyên Thông, refers to an important event which occurred at the ancient pagoda Từ Đàm, central Âu Lạc, in 1951. That year, Từ Đàm Pagoda was the venue for a meeting which 51 representatives from 6 groups of monk assemblies and lay spiritual practitioners from all three regions of Âu Lạc attended to establish the Vietnamese Buddhist Association and approved the Vietnamese Buddhist Association’s joining World Buddhism Association. Từ Đàm Pagoda is located on a large and high area, 2 kilometers from the center of Huế City. Từ Đàm means the benevolent cloud, symbolizing Buddha. The temple was founded after 1695 by the Venerable Minh Hoàng Tử Dung, an eminent monk of Lâm Tế Zen lineage. Reconstructed in 2006, Từ Đàm Pagoda nowadays is spacious with a high and large three-door gate, and an elegant tiled roof. The pagoda yard is airy, large enough to hold thousands of people during ceremonies. In front of the main hall is a majestic 7-story Precious Tower, with Buddha statues worshiped on every floor. To the left of the hall is a statue of Dr. Lê Đình Thám who contributed significantly to help promote Buddhism and founded the modern-day Buddhist Family in Âu Lạc. The Buddhist Family consists of members who regularly participate in group activities, assist in the temple’s work, study Buddha’s teachings, and acquire living skills. The purpose of the Buddhist Family is to train youths to become true Buddhists who help build Aulacese society in the Buddhist spirit. Từ Đàm Pagoda prides itself as the founding place of the Buddhist Family, an organization that later spread throughout the country. Từ Đàm Pagoda is now the headquarter of the Buddhist Association in Thừa Thiên-Huế Province. Important Buddhist ceremonies in Huế are always held solemnly at this pagoda. My homeland is here Aloewood incense smoke softly wafts day and night Sounds of scripture reciting linger this evening O cherished Từ Đàm Pagoda Where North and South join as one family Hand in hand, for the sake of humanity, O Từ Đàm! Another traditional temple not to be missed every time one visits central Âu Lạc is Tà Cú Temple in Bình Thuận Province. Hidden in a vast verdant forest of ancient trees, the temple has been recognized as a national historical-cultural monument. Tà Cú Temple is comprised of two temples: Upper Temple (or Patriarch Temple) and Lower Temple. The Patriarch Temple was founded by Patriarch Hữu Đức in about 1872. The Lower Temple was built after Patriarch Hữu Đức passed on. These two temples are situated south of Tà Cú Mountain, at the height of 475 meters above sea level. Tà Cú Temple is famous for its majestic scenery and idyllic mountain and forests. On the other hand, with reverence, humans through many generations have created grand architectural works of art such as the 49-meter-long statue of Shakyamuni Buddha entering Nirvana. To cast this Buddha statue, 200 workers worked day and night for two years. Nearby are statues of Amitabha Buddha, Quan Yin Bodhisattva, and Mahasthamaprapta Bodhisattva, viewing the whole world with gentle countenance as if ready to save beings. About 100 meters under the statue’s foot is a mountain cave where the founding Patriarch practiced spiritually. In 1993, Tà Cú Temple, along with the forests in the nature reserve area, was ranked a national attraction of Âu Lạc. On the road from Quy Nhơn City to Nhơn Hội, passing Bà Mountain at Phù Cát District, we will see a glimpse of a crimson rooftop amidst the deep green forest trees. That’s Linh Phong Monastery, one of the most ancient Buddhist temples in Bình Định Province. From the road going to the mountain’s foot about a couple of meters, we will see the pillars that open up to the stone steps leading to the monastery. The way to the monastery still retains its pristine look, with plants growing between the rocks. Climbing over 100 stone steps, we will see the monastery at the height of 400 meters above sea level. According to Linh Phong Monastery’s record book, in 1702, Zen Master Tịnh Giác came to this mountain, built a thatched hut to practice spiritually, and used tree bark to make clothes. When needing food, he’d carry firewood to the foot of the mountain, and left it there. Local people would bring rice and salt to exchange. The following day, the Master would go down to gather the food, then quietly returned to the mountain. Every time an epidemic plagued the village, he would bring medicine down the mountain to treat people, then immediately left without taking any payment. The north side of the mountain still retains the vestige of a large stone cave where Master Tịnh Giác practiced spiritually before. In 1733, Lord Nguyễn Phúc Chú, who praised the Master as a true spiritual practitioner, ordered the temple renovation, and renamed it Linh Phong Monastery. Nowadays, Linh Phong Monastery has been totally reconstructed. In front of the main hall is the Quan Yin Bodhisattva statue with the vase of Pure Water. In the back is the Patriarch Hall where a statue of Master Tịnh Giác is worshipped. Under the shade of lush ancient trees, with a waft of fragrant lotus, one feels light and peaceful. Crossing a bridge over a stream, following stone steps to go up the mountain behind the temple, here we find many ancient towers among mountain stones and forest trees. This is where the temple’s deceased abbots were buried. Further into the mountain, there are many stones stacking up, creating a tranquil space suitable for meditation. From the mountain, looking yonder, we’ll see the clear blue Thị Nại Lagoon. Near the mountain’s foot are villages with brown tiled roofs standing out from green paddy fields. Along the seaside, waves toss up white foams. Leaving the monastery, we come to realize that this world is really beautiful and charming. Thank you for watching today’s program introducing a number of famous ancient temples in central Âu Lạc. Please stay tuned to Supreme Master Television. Coming up next is Vegetarianism: The Noble Way of Living, right after Noteworthy News. So long for now.
29 Sep 2011
596
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27:58
http://SupremeMasterTV.com – Thiên Mụ Pagoda, Bảo Lâm Temple, & Tam Thai Temple in Central Âu Lạc (Vietnam) (In Aulacese). Episode: 1825, Air Date: 13 September 2011. Today’s A Journey through Aesthetic Realms will be presented in Aulacese (Vietnamese), with subtitles in Arabic, Chinese, English, French, German, Hungarian, Indonesian, Hungarian, Indonesian, Italian, Japanese, Korean, Mongolian, Persian, Portuguese, Persian, Portuguese, Russian and Spanish. The Unsurpassed Dharma King is matchless throughout the three realms and beyond Teacher of gods and humans. Remember that Âu Lạc is a holy land. Do you see the map? Does it look like an “S”? Do you see the Tao symbol? It has a circle with the letter “S” in the middle; one side is white with a black dot and the other black with a white dot. These are called yin and yang. Âu Lạc looks like that. By looking at the geography, one can tell that it’s a sacred land with extraordinary people. Âu Lạc (Vietnam) is a country in Southeast Asia with a history of over 4,000 years of civilization. Since ancient times, the sacred and beautiful land of the descendants of the Dragon King and Fairy Princess has been the birthplace of many enlightened spiritual practitioners such as the Sixth Patriarch Hui Neng, Great Master Khuông Việt, Zen Master Vạn Hạnh, Zen Master Mãn Giác, Lý Era’s National Teacher Nguyễn Minh Không, Zen Master Từ Đạo Hạnh, Grand Master Tuệ Trung, Zen Master Huyền Quang, Zen Master Pháp Loa, Trúc Lâm First Patriarch Trần Nhân Tông, Zen Master Vũ Khắc Minh, and Zen Master Vũ Khắc Trường. In modern times, Âu Lạc has been graced by Buddha Master Tây An, founder of the Bửu Sơn Kỳ Hương Order; Master Ngô Minh Chiêu, founder of the Cao Đài religion; Master Nguyễn Thành Nam, founder of Đạo Dừa; Master Huỳnh Phú Sổ, founder of Hòa Hảo Buddhism; First Master Minh Đăng Quang, founder of the Sangha Bhikshu Buddhist Association; and more recently, Supreme Master Ching Hai, a world-renowned spiritual teacher who imparts the Quan Yin Method – all were born on this holy land. Buddhism, around 300 BCE, under the reign of King Hùng III, was introduced to Âu Lạc from India. Since then Âu Lạc has been graced by the presence of many venerable monks and nuns. Among them were great sages who contributed immensely to the nation’s development and worked tirelessly to disseminate Truth teachings. The ancestors of Buddhism were great Zen masters. When you go home, read the book “Vietnamese Zen Masters,” written by the Venerable Thích Thanh Từ. You will learn how the Aulacese (Vietnamese) of the past practiced spiritually, who the great Zen Masters were, and how enlightened they were. In Âu Lạc, Buddhism reached its pinnacle in the Lý and Trần dynasties. An excerpt from “A Collection of Unusual Tales,” written by eminent scholar Nguyễn Dữ, describes: “Those initiated into monkhood or nunhood were as many as half of the general population. Pagodas were constructed, more than 10 in large villages, and about 5, 6 in small villages.” Pagodas can be found throughout the nation, from north to south. For instance, northern Âu Lạc has the One Pillar Pagoda, built around 1049; the Đậu Pagoda built in the 11th century; and Perfume Pagoda, built at the end of the 17th century. The Central region has Celestial Seal Pagoda, built in 1694; Từ Đàm Pagoda built at the end of the 17th century; and Heavenly Lady Pagoda, officially built in 1601. The Heavenly Lady Pagoda in the Complex of Huế Monuments was recognized by the United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization (UNESCO) in 1993 as a World Cultural Heritage site. Southern Âu Lạc has Sacred Mountain Cave Temple, built in the 18th century, Vĩnh Tràng Pagoda at the beginning of the 19th century, and Tây An Temple in the 19th century. From the early 20th century till now, Buddhism in Âu Lạc continues to flourish. According to statistical data by the Buddhist Sangha of Vietnam, the number of Buddhists taking refuge in the Three Jewels (Enlightened Master, Truth, Saintly Assembly) have reached nearly 45 million. The entire nation has over 44,000 monks and nuns, with more than 14,000 pagodas, temples and monasteries. The temple has become an endearing image closely connected to the life of the Aulacese people, who go to the temple to study profound Buddhist teachings, find inner peace, and be reminded of their ancestors’ virtues, as conveyed in the verses written by the Most Venerable Thích Mãn Giác: “The temple protects the spirit of the nation, It’s our ancestors’ way of life since time immemorial.” During a lecture at the Việt Nam Temple in Los Angeles, California, USA on March 24, 1991, Supreme Master Ching Hai expounded on the purpose and significance of a temple. A temple is an important place. Why is it important? It’s important not because it’s big but because it reminds everyone not to forget his or her spiritual aspiration. Therefore, a temple is a place for you to come to study Buddhism, to stand and walk more dignified. You must find the monks to study Truth teachings so that your mind develops further. But you must protect the temple. For example, if you’ve been going there for a long time, the temple would inevitably have wear and tear, so you should contribute your effort and material resources to upkeep it. First, the temple represents the long-standing culture of Âu Lạc (Vietnam); it represents a great religion in the world. Second, it’s there so that you can have a refuge for the spirit, and third, for our children to have a place to continue the virtuous traditions of the Aulacese (Vietnamese) people. We are deeply grateful to Supreme Master Ching Hai for her treasured words and boundless grace for the nation and the righteous and pious people of Âu Lạc. In a foreign land, I met you some years ago. Your nun’s robe, the color of faded brown, Both worldly life and renunciation uncertain. Born with a headstrong personality, In a female form, you endured controversy. I read the old verse with nostalgia – A cheerful line here, a line of grievance there. Each polished sentence Still quietly reflects your grace and elegance. When you passed on, who cried and who rejoiced? To whom could you explain the misjudgments and turmoil? Pray to the Three Jewels on the high abode May the Awakened Soul be saved from the world of sorrow! Beauty is often ill-fated; A poet’s hair turns gray before others’! Alas! Alas! At the Buddha’s altar, I lit a fragrant incense In reverence And prayed to Amitabha Buddha To take the kindhearted to the Western Land... Namo Buddha Namo Dharma (Teachings) Namo Sangha (Assembly of renunciates) Namo Quan Yin Bodhisattva Mahasattva! To take the kindhearted to the Western Land... Beauty is often ill-fated; A poet’s hair turns gray before others’! Alas! Alas! At the Buddha’s altar, I lit a fragrant incense In reverence And prayed to Amitabha Buddha To take the kindhearted to the Western Land... Namo Buddha Namo Dharma (Teachings) Namo Sangha (Assembly of renunciates) Namo Quan Yin Bodhisattva Mahasattva! To take the kindhearted to the Western Land... Namo Buddha Namo Dharma (Teachings) Namo Sangha (Assembly of renunciates) Namo Quan Yin Bodhisattva Mahasattva! To take the kindhearted to the Western Land... In today’s program, we invite you to visit Thiên Mụ Pagoda, Bảo Lâm Temple and Tam Thai Temple, three famous and ancient Buddhist temples in central Âu Lạc (Vietnam). On the first day of the lunar month, I visit the temple. I go with my mother to buy lotus flowers. Huế is the place of many historical areas, natural beauty, and famous ancient Buddhist temples in Âu Lạc, among them is Thiên Mụ Pagoda. Thiên Mụ Pagoda was built in 1601 and has been renovated several times through the Nguyễn dynasty. The pagoda’s name came from a legend. It’s said that in olden days, at night, villagers often saw an old lady in a red dress and green trousers, who appeared on the hill where the pagoda is situated now and said, “A true lord will come here and build a pagoda to harness the energy and strengthen the good layer of earth, for Âu Lạc to become a powerful nation.” After coming to govern Thuận Hóa, Lord Nguyễn Hoàng once passed here and heard this story. He had a pagoda built and named it Thiên Mụ (Heavenly Lady) Pagoda. The pagoda is situated on the hill lush with many plants. In the front, the dreamy Perfume River is like a silken strand of fabric, hugging the foothill. The pagoda is enclosed by brick walls, with a tower in the front, a shrine at the back, all appearing solemn and mythical. Phước Duyên Tower in the pagoda front yard is regarded as the symbol of Thiên Mụ Pagoda, comprising seven stories, each for the worshiping of a different Buddha. The pagoda also has a grand, beautiful and precious bronze bell, cast during the reign of Lord Nguyễn Phúc Chu who reigned from 1691 to 1725. Inside the gate situated between the tower and the shrine stand the statues of Vajra (Diamond) Deity, the Dharma (true teaching) protectors. Đại Hùng Shrine, comprising of 5 compartments, where Buddhas are worshiped, is a grand architectural work with antiques having historical and artistic values such as statues of Dharma Guardians and the Ten Kings of Hades. Behind Đại Hùng Shrine is the Earth Store Bodhisattva Shrine and Quan Yin Shrine. Inside the pagoda is a flower garden with verdant ornamental trees, which leads to the tomb tower of the late Venerable Thích Đôn Hậu, the legendary abbot who dedicated all his life to activities benefiting Buddhism and people. Thiên Mụ Pagoda is a renowned tourist attraction in the ancient capital, classified as a national historical cultural monument. For centuries, the resonating sound of the bell and the pervading incense smoke amidst the serene air have stirred the hearts of many people in Huế, inspiring them to eschew worldly attachments and sorrow, and kindling the longing to return to our bliss-filled origin. The rhythm of scripture reciting reverberates in my heart, blending with the sounds of tocsin and brass bells. The love I feel from the Father of old is deeply imprinted in my innocent mind. Bảo Lâm Temple leans against the foot of Chóp Chài Mountain in Phú Yên Province. The temple was founded by Zen Master Đạo Trung of Rinzai Zen school, the 38th generation, in the 19th century. Crossing the gate, one sees a large, airy and graceful space with many kinds of flowers and decorative plants, meticulously cared for by the monks. In front of the main hall is a statue of Quan Yin Bodhisattva standing on a lotus. The path up the mountain slope is built of many stone steps across the gardens, creating a secluded and tranquil painting that is characteristic of Zen. The temple has a 18-meter high statue of Shakyamuni Buddha sitting on an immaculately white lotus, leaning against the mountain. Underneath are statues of the Dharma Guardians and Buddha’s disciples. Behind Shakyamuni Buddha statue is a green forest of shady trees amidst a garden called Lumbini, a reminder of where Buddha was born. The sight of Buddha preaching to the first five disciples is also reconstituted. With impressive figures of Dharma Guardian Deities, it’s as if the garden is leading visitors to a mythical world. By the forest are Bell Tower, Amitabha Shrine, and Maitreya Shrine. With a beautiful natural scenery, as well as harmonious architecture and tranquil atmosphere, Bảo Lâm is a famous ancient temple in Phú Yên that often welcomes numerous Buddhists and pilgrims who come to worship and find peace in the teachings of Buddha and recitals of scriptures. I pray to Buddha to bless me so that I can become an obedient child. From now on, I’ll stop indulging in play. I’m determined and vow to study diligently. One of the oldest Buddhist temples still existing in Đà Nẵng, situated on Ngũ Hành Mountain, is Tam Thai Temple. The temple was founded by Zen Master Nguyên Thiều in 1630; its majestic, ancient look has remained till this day. In the 6th Minh Mạng year (1825), the king ordered the restoration of Tam Thai Temple and conferred its title as a national pagoda. Legend has it that Princess Ngọc Lan, King Minh Mạng’s younger sister, came to be a nun at this temple. The king ordered her to return to the court to get married but the princess was determined to stay and practice spiritually. She wrote a poem to her royal brother, excerpted as follows: “Worldly affairs are all in a muddle. The more I see it, the more tainted it looks Morning bell dispels base thoughts Sound of afternoon tocsin shatters the mundane mind.” From the foot of the Thủy Mountain, following the stone steps to about halfway up the path, one sees stone pillars: that is the gate of Tam Thai Temple. Going past the gate, on both sides are Hành Cung which was built upon King Minh Mạng’s order to use as a resting place when His Majesty went sightseeing at the temple. To the left of the Tam Thai Temple is Huyền Không Cave which is high and wide; the air inside is cool. Next to it is Linh Nham Cave. Following the path across the mountain leads us to Tàng Chơn Cave and Linh Ứng Pagoda. The Vọng Giang Tower in front of the temple is situated at the peak of the Thủy Mountain. From here, one can have a broad view of the area. Rivers and mountains merge with the clouds, and the occasional sounds of the bell, tocsin and chanting – all bring about a supra-worldly joy and dettachment from mundane matters. I pray to Buddha to bless me so that I can become an obedient child. From now on, I’ll stop indulging in play. I’m determined and vow to study diligently. From now on, I’ll stop indulging in play. I’m determined and vow to study diligently. From now on, I’ll stop indulging in play. I’m determined and vow to study diligently. Thank you for watching today’s program featuring some the famous and ancient temples in central Âu Lạc. Please stay tuned to Supreme Master Television. Coming up next is Vegetarianism: The Noble Way of Living, right after Noteworthy News. So long for now.
10 Dec 2011
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http://SupremeMasterTV.com – One Pillar, Bút Tháp, & Vĩnh Nghiêm Pagodas in Northern Âu Lạc (Vietnam) (In Aulacese). Episode: 1860, Air Date: 18 October 2011. Today’s A Journey through Aesthetic Realms will be presented in Aulacese (Vietnamese), Aulacese (Vietnamese), with subtitles in Arabic, Chinese, English, French, German, Hungarian, Indonesian, Hungarian, Indonesian, Italian, Japanese, Korean, Mongolian, Persian, Portuguese, Persian, Portuguese, Russian and Spanish. The Unsurpassed Dharma King is matchless throughout the three realms and beyond Teacher of gods and humans. Remember that Âu Lạc is a holy land. Do you see the map? Does it look like an “S”? Do you see the Tao symbol? It has a circle with the letter “S” in the middle; one side is white with a black dot and the other black with a white dot. These are called yin and yang. Âu Lạc looks like that. By looking at the geography, one can tell that it’s a sacred land with extraordinary people. Âu Lạc (Vietnam) is a country in Southeast Asia with a history of over 4,000 years of civilization. Since ancient times, the sacred and beautiful land of the descendants of the Dragon King and Fairy Princess has been the birthplace of many enlightened spiritual practitioners such as the Sixth Patriarch Hui Neng, Great Master Khuông Việt, Zen Master Vạn Hạnh, Zen Master Mãn Giác, Lý Era’s National Teacher Nguyễn Minh Không, Zen Master Từ Đạo Hạnh, Grand Master Tuệ Trung, Zen Master Huyền Quang, Zen Master Pháp Loa, Trúc Lâm First Patriarch Trần Nhân Tông, Zen Master Vũ Khắc Minh, and Zen Master Vũ Khắc Trường. In modern times, Âu Lạc has been graced by Buddha Master Tây An, founder of the Bửu Sơn Kỳ Hương Order; Master Ngô Minh Chiêu, founder of the Cao Đài religion; Master Nguyễn Thành Nam, founder of Đạo Dừa; Master Huỳnh Phú Sổ, founder of Hòa Hảo Buddhism; First Master Minh Đăng Quang, founder of the Sangha Bhikshu Buddhist Association; and more recently, Supreme Master Ching Hai, a world-renowned spiritual teacher who imparts the Quan Yin Method – all were born on this holy land. Buddhism, around 300 BCE, under the reign of King Hùng III, was introduced to Âu Lạc from India. Since then Âu Lạc has been graced by the presence of many venerable monks and nuns. Among them were great sages who contributed immensely to the nation’s development and worked tirelessly to disseminate Truth teachings. The ancestors of Buddhism were great Zen masters. When you go home, read the book “Vietnamese Zen Masters,” written by the Venerable Thích Thanh Từ. You will learn how the Aulacese (Vietnamese) of the past practiced spiritually, who the great Zen Masters were, and how enlightened they were. In Âu Lạc, Buddhism reached its pinnacle in the Lý and Trần dynasties. An excerpt from “A Collection of Unusual Tales,” written by eminent scholar Nguyễn Dữ, describes: “Those initiated into monkhood or nunhood were as many as half of the general population. Pagodas were constructed, more than 10 in large villages, and about 5, 6 in small villages.” Pagodas can be found throughout the nation, from north to south. For instance, northern Âu Lạc has the One Pillar Pagoda, built around 1049; the Đậu Pagoda built in the 11th century; and Perfume Pagoda, built at the end of the 17th century. The Central region has Celestial Seal Pagoda, built in 1694; Từ Đàm Pagoda built at the end of the 17th century; and Heavenly Lady Pagoda, officially built in 1601. The Heavenly Lady Pagoda in the Complex of Huế Monuments was recognized by the United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization (UNESCO) in 1993 as a World Cultural Heritage site. Southern Âu Lạc has Sacred Mountain Cave Temple, built in the 18th century, Vĩnh Tràng Pagoda at the beginning of the 19th century, and Tây An Temple in the 19th century. From the early 20th century till now, Buddhism in Âu Lạc continues to flourish. According to statistical data by the Buddhist Sangha of Vietnam, the number of Buddhists taking refuge in the Three Jewels (Enlightened Master, Truth, Saintly Assembly) have reached nearly 45 million. The entire nation has over 44,000 monks and nuns, with more than 14,000 pagodas, temples and monasteries. The temple has become an endearing image closely connected to the life of the Aulacese people, who go to the temple to study profound Buddhist teachings, find inner peace, and be reminded of their ancestors’ virtues, as conveyed in the verses written by the Most Venerable Thích Mãn Giác: “The temple protects the spirit of the nation, It’s our ancestors’ way of life since time immemorial.” During a lecture at the Việt Nam Temple in Los Angeles, California, USA on March 24, 1991, Supreme Master Ching Hai expounded on the purpose and significance of a temple. A temple is an important place. Why is it important? It’s important not because it’s big but because it reminds everyone not to forget his or her spiritual aspiration. Therefore, a temple is a place for you to come to study Buddhism, to stand and walk more dignified. You must find the monks to study Truth teachings so that your mind develops further. But you must protect the temple. For example, if you’ve been going there for a long time, the temple would inevitably have wear and tear, so you should contribute your effort and material resources to upkeep it. First, the temple represents the long-standing culture of Âu Lạc (Vietnam); it represents a great religion in the world. Second, it’s there so that you can have a refuge for the spirit, and third, for our children to have a place to continue the virtuous traditions of the Aulacese (Vietnamese) people. We are deeply grateful to Supreme Master Ching Hai for her treasured words and boundless grace for the nation and the righteous and pious people of Âu Lạc. In a foreign land, I met you some years ago. Your nun’s robe, the color of faded brown, Both worldly life and renunciation uncertain. Born with a headstrong personality, In a female form, you endured controversy. I read the old verse with nostalgia – A cheerful line here, a line of grievance there. Each polished sentence Still quietly reflects your grace and elegance. When you passed on, who cried and who rejoiced? To whom could you explain the misjudgments and turmoil? Pray to the Three Jewels on the high abode May the Awakened Soul be saved from the world of sorrow! Beauty is often ill-fated; A poet’s hair turns gray before others’! Alas! Alas! At the Buddha’s altar, I lit a fragrant incense In reverence And prayed to Amitabha Buddha To take the kindhearted to the Western Land... Namo Buddha Namo Dharma (Teachings) Namo Sangha (Assembly of renunciates) Namo Quan Yin Bodhisattva Mahasattva! To take the kindhearted to the Western Land... Beauty is often ill-fated; A poet’s hair turns gray before others’! Alas! Alas! At the Buddha’s altar, I lit a fragrant incense In reverence And prayed to Amitabha Buddha To take the kindhearted to the Western Land... Namo Buddha Namo Dharma (Teachings) Namo Sangha (Assembly of renunciates) Namo Quan Yin Bodhisattva Mahasattva! To take the kindhearted to the Western Land... Namo Buddha Namo Dharma (Teachings) Namo Sangha (Assembly of renunciates) Namo Quan Yin Bodhisattva Mahasattva! To take the kindhearted to the Western Land... In today’s program, we’d like to invite you to visit One Pillar, Bút Tháp and Vĩnh Nghiêm Pagodas, three famous ancient temples in northern Âu Lạc (Vietnam). Going to the temple with a lotus branch Going to the temple with a lotus branch Having a meal by the lamp, planting rice in the moonlight Three, four young women rendezvous with the moon Befriend the moon We light the lamp and play with the moonlight on the veranda We pray for peace and harmony within and without. Going to the temple with a lotus branch Going to the temple with a lotus branch Having a meal by the lamp, planting rice in the moonlight Three, four young women rendezvous with the moon Befriend the moon We light the lamp and play with the moonlight on the veranda We pray for peace and harmony within and without. Going to the temple with a lotus branch Going to the temple with a lotus branch Having a meal by the lamp, planting rice in the moonlight Three, four young women rendezvous with the moon Befriend the moon We light the lamp and play with the moonlight on the veranda We pray for peace and harmony within and without. Going to the temple with a lotus branch Going to the temple with a lotus branch Having a meal by the lamp, planting rice in the moonlight Three, four young women rendezvous with the moon Befriend the moon We light the lamp and play with the moonlight on the veranda We pray for peace and harmony within and without. Going to the temple with a lotus branch Going to the temple with a lotus branch Going to the temple with a lotus branch Going to the temple with a lotus branch You’ve just enjoyed the northern Aulacese folk song titled “Planting Rice” with vocals and dance accompaniment by our vegan Association members from northern Âu Lạc, describing the activities of the rural young women under the moonlight, in rice planting season. They do not, however, forget to go to the temple together to pray for a peaceful homeland and happy family. In the 1000th anniversary of Thăng Long-Hà Nội, one of the most popular tourist attractions was One Pillar Pagoda. One Pillar Pagoda belongs to the architectural complex of Diên Hựu Pagoda in the west of Thăng Long Citadel under the Lý Dynasty, now in One Pillar Pagoda Street, Ba Đình District, Hà Nội. One Pillar Pagoda is also called Lotus Dais. According to “Complete Annals of Đại Việt,” the pagoda was built in 1049, during the reign of Lý Thái Tông. Legend has it that King Lý Thái Tông dreamt of Quan Yin Buddha taking him by the hand onto the lotus dais. Upon waking up, the king told the court about his dream. Venerable Monk Thiên Tuế advised him to construct a pagoda, erect a stone pillar in the middle of the lake, and build a lotus-shaped dais to worship Quan Yin Buddha like what he saw in his dream. The entire One Pillar Pagoda was placed on a 2-piece stone pillar which at first sight looks like one intact stone pillar. The temple was made of wood, including a square lotus dais with staircase leading to the main hall built of red bricks. A Quan Yin Bodhisattva statue is worshiped inside the temple. The pagoda’s architecture and decoration is the result of an poetic imagination. It especially uses a robust system of propping wood from the pillars to the floor, creating a steady position while giving an image of a lotus flower rising straight, and thus the pagoda is also called Lotus Dais. The architecture of the One Pillar Pagoda symbolizes a noble concept: Compassion illumines the world. The wood and stone architecture placed in a setting of a pond and plants creates a sense of familiarity, pure yet elegant. One Pillar Pagoda was elected as one of the symbols of Hà Nội. Besides, the image of One Pillar Pagoda was imprinted on the back of the coins in Âu Lạc. On May 4, 2006, One Pillar Pagoda was included in the Aulacese Guinness Book of Records as “the pagoda with the most unique architecture in Âu Lạc.” One Pillar Pagoda – a pagoda in the middle of a small lake, just enough space for incense burners and a statue – has no wall fence, no bell tower, and no triple gate, but is still majestic in the hearts of Aulacese people and remains steady in the endless course of time. Bút Tháp Pagoda is quietly situated by the Đuống River’s right bank in Thuận Thành District, Bắc Ninh Province. The pagoda was built during the reign of King Trần Thánh Tông by Zen Master Huyền Quang. In the 17th century, the pagoda became famous with the Abbots being the Venerable Chuyết Chuyết and Zen Master Minh Hạnh. It was during this time that Queen mother Trịnh Thị Ngọc Trúc left the palace to practice spiritually here. Looking at the pagoda from outside, one first sees the triple gate. Next are the two-story, eight-roof bell tower and two banyan trees, all lend the structure an ancient and secluded atmosphere. Bút Tháp Pagoda has many buildings separated by open spaces. Its architecture isn’t rising vertically, but spreading out on the surface. Various heights of architectural clusters make one feel as if the pagoda is gently floating in the Buddha’s realm. The pagoda roof is quite large and droops down, almost touching the ground level, creating a warm and cozy space. The architecture uses wood frames for support, but the balcony foundation is constructed with stones. Decorations are seen everywhere on wood and stone materials, on the pillars and altars. The images engraved here are lively with implied meanings in Buddhism and profound Zen elements. Bút Tháp Pagoda has a very unique system of round statues. Most spectacular is the celebrated Thousand-Eye, Thousand-Arm Quan Yin Bodhisattva that was carved in 1656. Aside from the two main arms placed on the chest and the legs, the statue also has 38 big arms on both sides. The most extended arm is 2 meters long. There are 789 smaller arms in the back that form a halo for the statue, with an eye carved in each of the palms. The arms symbolize both Buddha’s merciful light and his world-saving mission, and are the eyes that clearly see and care for sentient beings. The statue of Thousand-Arm, Thousand-Eye Quan Yin Bodhisattva is the iconic symbol of the hieroglyphic art of Aulacese Buddhism. For the rotary tower of Nine Class Lotus, nine lotus daises symbolize 9 levels of enlightenment in Buddhism. The tower can rotate without making any sound even though it was constructed centuries ago. Each complete rotation of the tower corresponds to 3,542,400 recitations of Buddha’s name. In 1876, King Tự Đức passed by this place and saw a giant stone tower, thus he named it Bút Tháp Pagoda. That is Báo Nghiêm Tower – an octagonal stone tower of five levels where Zen Master Chuyết Chuyết’s relics were buried. “Vast sea of green rice paddy stretches Stately stands the tower in moonlit shade of areca trees Surrounded by a scenic landscape all around An ancient picture is filled with mountain and sea.” Bút Tháp Pagoda is indeed a unique relic of Buddhism in the northern Aulacese plains. Vĩnh Nghiêm Pagoda is located at the confluence of Lục Nam River and Thương River in Bắc Giang Province. The pagoda existed since the Lý Thái Tổ dynasty. In the Trần Thánh Tông dynasty, many eminent monks came here to practice spiritually, and the pagoda was rebuilt to become majestic and splendid. When leaving the throne for a monastic life, before coming to Yên Tử, King Trần Nhân Tông stayed at Vĩnh Nghiêm Pagoda. He became the founding Patriarch of the Aulacese Zen order. In 1313, Vĩnh Nghiêm Pagoda was officially proclaimed by Zen Patriarch Pháp Loa as the headquarters of Đại Việt Buddhist Order. Going past the triple gate, strolling on the pebble-paved road, the ancient pagoda of nearly 1,000 years emerges behind the pine trees. The pagoda was constructed along the south-east direction, consisting of four building blocks. The first block comprises of three temples: Hộ Temple, Celestial Perfume Palace, and Upper Hall with magnificently constructed altar. After many restorations, this area still preserves its 1,000-year-old dirt-compacted foundation and the 700-year-old nhập nhân tree. The smaller second block is the First Patriarch Home which worships the portrait statue of Third Patriarch Trúc Lâm. The third block is the two-level roof Bell Tower. The fourth is the Second Patriarch Home, the dining hall with a rather large wooden Bodhisattva statue. The highlight of Vĩnh Nghiêm Pagoda is its wooden architecture with neither complex nor red-lacquered, gold trimmed decorations. The Tả Vu and Hữu Vu buildings, each has 18 spacious compartments are where the monks everywhere come to stay for their summer retreat annually. Vĩnh Nghiêm Pagoda used to be a place to cultivate the Buddhist monks and nuns, thus this place keeps the scriptures carved on wood panels of 700 years old. This is a highly treasured ancient library, which people of the past called the “wood panel scripture archive.” The sizes of the wood panels varies depending on the scripture. The largest carved panel is measured 1 meter long, and 40 – 50 centimeters wide. Vĩnh Nghiêm Pagoda along with Yên Tử Temple and Quỳnh Lâm Temple form a cluster of famous landscapes in northern Âu Lạc: “Anyone who comes to Yên Tử and Quỳnh Lâm The heart is yet tranquil, has one not reached Vĩnh Nghiêm.” The pristine beauty and serenity of Vĩnh Nghiêm Pagoda awaken one’s mind to remember our eternal spiritual origin. Thank you for watching today’s program introducing some well-known ancient temples in northern Âu Lạc. Please stay tuned to Supreme Master Television.
3 Feb 2012
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http://shop.happyhardcore.com/View/22213/ Gavin G & DJ Sytronik ft. Lisa Abbot - Sorry (Hujib's Lethal Bounce Mix) on Lethal Theory records a uk hardcore, bouncy, happy hardcore record label. This track is the B1 side of LETHAL002
7 Jan 2009
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Steve Andrew - The Wheel and Dent Doctor 27 Richards Close, Dawlish, Devon, EX7 9SN http://www.mobilealloywheelrepair.co.uk At The Wheel and Dent Doctor you can be sure of unbeaten prices and unbeaten service because we offer mobile alloy wheel repair and refurbishment at rock bottom prices. We cover most areas of the South West of Devon including Exeter,Plymouth,Newton Abbot,Torquay and Torbay. So be sure to call us to book your appointment with our mobile alloy wheel repair service.
29 Jul 2011
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