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HYD offers very comprehensive programs that are customized to each person. Patients are taught what to eat and not eat, shown what nutritional supplements to take and what exercises to do. It is a combination of these 3 things that gets your body healthy again naturally and reduces or eliminates your need for medications.
9 Mar 2017
16
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0:54
Diabetic Foot Care - San Francisco Podiatrist Union Square CA Dr. Bill Metaxas discusses the Diabetic Complications and Amputation Prevention. http://www.footankleinstitutesf.com DIABETIC COMPLICATIONS AND AMPUTATION PREVENTION People with diabetes are prone to many foot problems, often because of two complications of diabetes: nerve damage (neuropathy) and poor blood circulation. Neuropathy causes loss of feeling in your feet, taking away your ability to feel pain and discomfort, so you may not detect an injury or irritation. Poor circulation in your feet reduces your ability to heal, making it hard for even a tiny cut to resist infection. When you have diabetes, you need to be aware of how foot problems can arise from disturbances in the skin, nails, nerves, bones, muscles, and blood vessels. Furthermore, in diabetes, small foot problems can turn into serious complications. You can do much to prevent amputation by taking two important steps: • Follow the proactive measures discussed below • See your foot and ankle surgeon regularly. Your Proactive Measures You play a vital role in reducing complications. Follow these guidelines and contact your foot and ankle surgeon if you notice any problems: • Inspect your feet daily. Skin or nail problems-Look for cuts, scrapes, redness, drainage, swelling, bad odor, rash, discoloration, loss of hair on toes, injuries, or nail changes (deformed, striped, yellowed or discolored, thickened, or not growing). Signs of fracture-If your foot is swollen, red, hot, or has changed in size, shape, or direction, see your foot and ankle surgeon immediately. (If your eyesight is poor, have someone else do it for you.) • Observe for changes in circulation. Pay attention to the color of your toes. If they turn red, pink, or purplish when your legs hang down while sitting, poor circulation may be a problem. • Don't ignore leg pain. Pain in the leg that occurs at night or with a little activity could mean you have a blocked artery. Seek care immediately. • Nail cutting. If you have any nail problems, hard nails, or reduced feeling in your feet, your toenails should be trimmed professionally. • No bathroom surgery. Never trim calluses or corns yourself, and don't use over-the-counter medicated pads. • Keep floors free of sharp objects. Make sure there are no needles, insulin syringes, or other sharp objects on the floor. • Don't go barefoot. Wear shoes, indoors and outdoors. • Check shoes and socks. Shake out your shoes before putting them on. Make sure your socks aren't bunched up. • Have your sense of feeling tested. Your foot and ankle surgeon will perform various tests to see if you've lost any feeling. Visit our website: http://www.footankleinstitutesf.com
26 Aug 2011
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1:21
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20 Oct 2008
4752
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2:11
A report by Amnesty International shows that North Korea is suffering a health care dilemma with unsanitary and unsafe medical practices.
17 Jul 2010
451
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4:50
A selected clip from horror film, The Texas Chainsaw Massacre.
21 Dec 2011
13585
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2:45
HYD offers very comprehensive programs that are customized to each person. Patients are taught what to eat and not eat, shown what nutritional supplements to take and what exercises to do. It is a combination of these 3 things that gets your body healthy again naturally and reduces or eliminates your need for medications.
13 Jan 2017
33
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2:45
HYD offers very comprehensive programs that are customized to each person. Patients are taught what to eat and not eat, shown what nutritional supplements to take and what exercises to do. It is a combination of these 3 things that gets your body healthy again naturally and reduces or eliminates your need for medications.
22 Jan 2017
30
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0:33
The American Diabetes Association’s American Diabetes Alert® is a one-day, "wake-up" call to inform the public about the seriousness of diabetes, particularly when diabetes is left undiagnosed or untreated. American Diabetes Alert® Day encourages those at risk for developing type 2 diabetes to take the American Diabetes Risk Test and, if they score high, to schedule an appointment to see their doctor. The risk test, in English or Spanish, is available in brochure form by calling the Association toll-free at 1-800-DIABETES (1-800-342-2383) or by visiting www.diabetes.org/risk-test. * Nearly 21 million children and adults in the United States have diabetes – and one third of them are unaware they have the disease. * Another 54 million Americans have pre-diabetes, a condition that puts them at serious risk for developing type 2 diabetes. * Among the primary risk factors for type 2 diabetes are being overweight, sedentary, over the age of 45 and having a family history of diabetes. African Americans, Latinos, Native Americans, Asian Americans and Pacific Islanders are at an increased risk, as are women who have had babies weighing more than nine pounds at birth. * Unfortunately, people with type 2 diabetes can live for years without realizing that they have the disease. While people with diabetes can exhibit noticeable symptoms, such as frequent urination, blurred vision and excessive thirst, most people diagnosed with type 2 diabetes do not show these overt warning signs at the time that they develop the disease. * Often, type 2 diabetes only becomes evident when people develop one or more of its serious complications, such as heart disease, stroke, kidney disease, eye damage, and nerve damage that can lead to amputations. * Diabetes is the fifth leading cause of death by disease and has no cure. The American Diabetes Association is the leading non-profit health organization dedicated to preventing and curing diabetes and to improving the lives of the nearly 21 million children and adults currently living with the disease. Held on the fourth Tuesday of every March, the 19th annual American Diabetes Alert® is March 27, 2007.
27 Mar 2007
1368
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First of its Kind National Report Reveals Estimated High Prevalence and Heavy Cost of Type 2 Diabetes Complications in America In Response, Health Organizations Unite to Help Educate on Good Diabetes Management and How to Reduce the Risk of Other Serious Health Problems A first of its kind report looking at the prevalence and cost of type 2 diabetes complications shows that an estimated three out of five people (57.9 percent) with type 2 diabetes have at least one of the other serious health problems commonly associated with the disease, and that these health problems are taking a heavy financial toll on the United States. In 2006, the nation spent an estimated $22.9 billion on direct medical costs related to diabetes complications. The new report, titled State of Diabetes Complications in America, also shows that estimated annual healthcare costs for a person with type 2 diabetes complications are about three times higher than that of the average American without diagnosed diabetes. These complications, which can include heart disease, stroke, eye damage, chronic kidney disease and foot problems that can lead to amputations, cost a person with type 2 diabetes almost $10,000 each year. People with diabetes complications pay nearly $1,600 out of their own pockets for costs that are not reimbursed by insurance, such as co-payments and deductibles. This amount is significant, considering that according to the National Health Interview Survey, an estimated 40 percent of adults with diabetes reported a family income of less than $35,000 per year in 2005. Results from the report were released today at the American Association of Clinical Endocrinologists (AACE) 16th Annual Meeting and Clinical Congress, by AACE in partnership with the members of a diabetes complications consortium: the Amputee Coalition of America, Mended Hearts, the National Federation of the Blind and the National Kidney Foundation, and supported by GlaxoSmithKline. The State of Diabetes Complications in America is an analysis of national health and economic data specific to type 2 diabetes complications, and was developed as a follow-up to a 2005 AACE study showing that two out of three Americans with type 2 diabetes analyzed in a study had elevated blood sugar levels, which can lead to diabetes complications. Many people with type 2 diabetes develop more than one health complication associated with the disease. The new report shows that an estimated one out of three people (33.3 percent) with the disease has one other serious health problem; one out of ten people (10.3 percent) with the disease has two other serious health problems; one out of 15 people (6.7 percent) with the disease has three other serious health problems; one out of 13 people (7.6 percent) has four or more other serious health problems. The report makes it clear that we have a major national issue when it comes to diabetes management, and that urgent action is needed, said Daniel Einhorn, MD, FACE, and Secretary of the Board of Directors of AACE. People with type 2 diabetes need to achieve and maintain good blood glucose levels over time to improve their chances of reducing the risk of these serious complications. The State of Diabetes Complications in America report synthesizes data from two large national studies to examine the issue of diabetes related complications in the United States. Data on the prevalence of diabetes related complications were derived from the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES) and combined with economic data from the Medical Expenditure Panel Survey (MEPS).
11 Apr 2007
992
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2:35
Amputated foot was not good enough to be considered a "terrorist attack". Then who qualified for 9/11 Victims Compensation ? Visit http://peppini.com for more.
15 Apr 2007
487
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1:38
Production By Military Practitioners Spotlights Service To Wounded Warriors The Occupational Therapy Department at Walter Reed Army Medical Center has produced a 90 second video to showcase some of the many rehabilitation services that are provided to wounded soldiers. As advances in battlefield medicine save more soldiers' lives than ever before, the science of occupational therapy is providing rehabilitation that allows America's wounded warriors to return to full participation in life. The video is the latest educational tool that the American Occupational Therapy Association (AOTA) is promoting in support of Occupational Therapy Month 2007. "Critical work for our nation is being conducted by hundreds of therapists in Veterans Administration Hospitals, military facilities, private practices and community re-entry programs, says AOTA President M. Carolyn Baum PhD, OTR/L, FAOTA. "This video produced by the practitioners at Walter Reed will help focus attention on the important work being performed there, and the innovations in rehabilitation that will benefit all of society." Military practitioners treat a wide array of injuries including combat stress, traumatic brain injury, amputations and poly-trauma. Much of this video focuses on the rehabilitation provided in a therapy setting at Walter Reed called Fort Independence. The home-like setting features a living room, bed, kitchen and bathroom. Here soldiers relearn how to do everyday activities such as dressing, bathing, home maintenance and cooking a meal. Re-learning those activities of daily living fosters independence. "Occupational therapy must help our wounded warriors to recover, rehabilitate and live their lives to the fullest," adds Dr. Baum. "Community reintegration and enabling full participation will be critical to helping these individuals and their families rebuild their lives. We feel this new video will help raise public awareness of that important process."
13 Apr 2007
5554
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1:05
Little did we know back in 20 04 when we were taking home movies of our pet ferret Cosmo that dramatic critters wold be all the rage in 07. Consider this a prequel to the hit clip Dramatic Prairie Dog. Cosmo has since had his right rear leg amputated and is resting comfortably in the retired ferrite actors home in Burlington Vermont.
24 Jul 2007
1246
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3:50
John Cann Walks after 11 years of paralysis using a simple non-invasive free therapy, discovered by Andrew K Fletcher, who has shown beyond any shadow of doubt that gravity plays a vital roll in the circulation of fluids and that posture in relation to the constant direction of gravity is of paramount importance when restoring function to all neurological and non-neurological damage. Conditions this therapy has helped include: Parkinson's Disease, Multiple Sclerosis, Cerebral Palsy, spinal cord injury, short term memory loss, heart conditions, blood pressure, respiratory problems, psoriasis, thrombosis, varicose veins, oedema, optic nerve damage, bladder infections, scoliosis of the spine, leg ulcer, gangrene, even completely restoring sight in supposedly irreversible optic nerve damage caused through long term progressive ms, to the point where a lady with long term damage to the optic nerve, who could not make out the edge of her monitor, completed an Open University degree and can now legally drive a vehicle on the road without wearing glasses. Confirmed by her ophthalmologist. Check out my other video's to learn why tilting the bed has an effect on circulation. And please feel free to ask questions or leave a comment. Tested by an independent therapist: http://eregimens.com/therapies/MiscTherapies/Inclined%20bed%20therapy.html Currently conducting an experiment to prove that psoriasis is a circulation problem rather than a disease. If you know of anyone who has this condition and would help by providing before during and after photographs of affected areas please ask them to read the information about this experiment at: http://www.psoriasis-help.org.uk/forum/index.php/topic,18376.0.html Google "Andrew K Fletcher" or "inclined bed therapy" to learn more about this amazing discovery. Spinal Cord Injury On Saturday April 15th 2000, John obtained the timber for parallel bars to be erected at his home in Cornwall, On Sunday I went to John's home and completed the job, for tomorrow was to be a momentous occasion indeed. John was left paralysed, in 1990, when surgery to his spine went wrong. He was told that after two years any chance of further recovery would be highly unlikely and for the next six years he experienced little if any change in his condition. Monday morning I am on my way to John's home in Cornwall, to meet with Tim Iredale, who is a news reporter for Carlton Television Southwest. We intended to witness something truly magical. But could not have imagined what was in store for us. John was about walk in front of a television camera and crew for the first time in close to ten years. John had told me that he had regained the ability to move his legs, but I had grossly underestimated how much function John had regained. During the interview, John was asked to show how he manages to get out of bed now and he transferred with ease both in and out of bed, leaning back and lifting his legs. He was then asked to raise his legs while lying on the bed and he obliged with ease. When asked if he could feel when touched on his legs, he replied my legs feel like normal legs instead of heavy weights. John then went on to explain how much of the swelling in his legs had gone-and that this flies in the face of the current act of elevating the legs above the heart. Advise from the medical profession, which John duly ignored in favour of sleeping with his legs down. Fortunately for John this meant that he could now wear ankle braces and special shoes, which would, provided support for his substantially weakened and as yet unresponsive ankles. John approached the parallel bars in his wheel chair and applied the brakes when he was in position. He grasped the two ends of the parallel bars and using his legs he pushed himself into a vertical position. Towering some six feet four inches, John moved one leg in front of the other, bending the knees as he lifted each leg to walk 12 feet to the end of the bars. I turned and looked at Tim and saw disbelief and astonishment flash across his face, I bet my face was a sight to behold too. John then turned his powerful 19 stone body around and walked, yes walked back to his chair. Struggling and somewhat weakened by the experience, he lowered his body into the chair and his face had the expression of a boxer who had just knocked down his opponent. He said casually: 'Was that alright'? John had indeed delivered a powerful blow to his opponent. Fortunately heavy rain prevented us from doing a retake and the rest of the interview took place in John's bedroom. When the story was finished and everyone was ready to leave, I turned and thanked the camera man and Tim Iredale, who turned and said that this is one of those days that you will always remember, one of those days when you know exactly what you were doing. The cameraman said while shaking my hand that: ' it has been a privilege to work with me and witness the results from such a simple application'. I drove home the richest man alive that day and will remember it for the rest of my days. On Monday the 17th April 2000 I waited for the local news on Carlton TV and saw the opening news which pictured me looking down my Naturesway Sleep System, a simple bed designed for to take us into the new millennium. After the interlude the fun really started. John was walking for everyone in the South West of England to see, at least. The news stayed focused on the remarkable effects of two eight-inch blocks tucked under the head end of John's bed. No $billion research, no waiting for the next ten years to see if it works and no room for any refutation of the results, which were plain for everyone to see on Carlton Television, News, Language Science Park, Plympton, Plymouth, Devon, UK. But John is not the only person with a spinal cord injury, who is benefiting from the effects of gravity, in fact there are two more people in the Torbay Area of Devon who are making steady progress. Sunday Independent April 16th,2000 page 4 Burrington Way, Plymouth PL5 3LN UK Heading: RAISING HIS BED TOWARDS THE SKIES, BY ANTHONY ABBOTT. WHEELCHAIR-BOUND Julian Boustead is taking to the skies for a parachute jump to raise awareness about a simple bed treatment that's given him a new lease of life. The 37 year old - who was left paralysed after breaking his neck during a charity assault course run. Struggling to get out of bed in the morning and always felt the cold until he took the simple step of raising the head of his bed on blocks of wood by a matter of inches. Julian, who lives near Torquay, has urged everyone to try the Naturesway Sleep System, Pioneered by West-Country Inventor Andrew Fletcher, and first revealed in the Sunday Independent nearly three years ago. He said; 'I used to feel dizzy when I got up and I couldn't stay outdoors for long because I always felt the cold. 'After the first night, I got out of bed straight away with the help of the nurses and I did not feel faint, My circulation has also improved. I would never put the bed back again and all my family are sleeping on raised beds.' Now Julian, a former professional boxer and equestrian expert who still teaches youngsters riding, has premised Andrew Fletcher he will do a parachute jump this summer to show other sufferers the benefit of the bed treatment. Julian Colour Picture: Sub heading: Wheelchair-bound Julian Boustead will jump from the skies this summer. Picture Steve Porter It was former engineer Andrew who contacted Julian two years ago after learning of his plight and suggested he tried the bed method. Gravity Andrew was fascinated by the way water moved up trees through roots and wandered how the gravity and the flow of water would effect the human body. He put some bricks under the head of his own bed and within four weeks, his wife's varicose veins had disappeared. Since then he has discovered his treatment has helped MS sufferers get some feeling back in their legs and arthritis sufferers. John's story In 1990 I had two slipped discs, and had a lamenectomy which ended up with me being unable to walk. It is thought that a delay of 39 hours for surgery to what was found to be a compression of the spinal cord was responsible for my paralysis. I was lucky enough to get a bed at ROOKWOOD Hospital, a place that I cannot thank or speak highly enough of, they gave me back the will to live. After two years all the slow progress stopped as I had been informed to expect. I had no feeling from the hips down and no movement of the legs at all. Luckily my arms were o.k so transfers to the wheelchair were more of a throw which usually ended with my coccyx hitting the wheel, but as there was no feeling, so it didn't bother me too much. After a few months came the most horrendous phantom pains like a knife attached to the mains that struck anywhere in the legs or feet, for this I was on strong painkillers or if it was too bad injections. When driving my car around a corner, I had to wedge my head against the roof of the car to stop my body from falling over. This was due to damage to the nerves, which used to control the nerves which held my upper body erect, something I used to take for granted as everyone else does. Getting into bed would involve tremendous effort. I would throw my rear onto the bed and then with my right hand holding the wheel, I would pull my left leg up, with my left hand, holding my trouser leg. Then holding the bedding with my left hand, I would pull my right leg up with my right hand. At one stage I had even asked for my legs to be amputated, as they were useless and hung heavily. In addition my toenails would fall out on a regular basis, predominantly the big toe nails, often coming away when I removed my socks. I often bumped my coccyx while transferring from my wheelchair, though I could not tell if I had injured myself, due to the absence of pain. About two years ago a cutting from a paper was sent to me, it was about Andrew Fletcher's raised bed. I rang Andrew and he explained his theory and told me how to raise the bed. The bed was raised eight inches that day, when I saw the bed it looked impossible not to end up on the floor at the foot. However that night was wonderful, the phantom pains stopped and I had a full nights sleep. Slowly things started to improve, improvements such as instead of having to grab my sock or trouser leg to lift my legs onto the bed I could lean back and swing them up, muscles in my thighs started to twitch, turning over in bed became possible without having to grab the side of the bed and pull myself over, not having to pull my legs over by hand. I have experienced so many improvements that creep up and are not noticed until days later. Pains started again and I thought here we go again, but it soon became obvious to me that it was nerve regeneration pains that I was experiencing. Although they felt like previous pains, these stayed in the same place anything from six to twenty four hours. The next time the pains moved further down the leg, now I am glad to say those pains have gone the last ones were in my toes. The present pains are in the feet again but generated from the nerve that runs under the buttocks, now the feeling has come back to that area it makes sitting in the wheelchair most uncomfortable, but that is the next problem to get over, but I will, in the knowledge that something else will improve when the new pains subside. Now, what I would like to say to everyone who reads this is; if you have any medical problem try it, and more importantly "stick with it"! Most of all have faith in the healing power of gravity, it has worked for me, AND WHEN I WALK AGAIN! I will first thank Andrew, and secondly I will let everyone that reads this web page know about it. John Cann Spinal Cord Injury Inclined Bed Study: Location to Post your diary: http://sci.rutgers.edu/forum/forumdisplay.php?f=43 Main Information Thread: http://sci.rutgers.edu/forum/showthread.php?t=53673 Diary of a person already testing the theory: http://sci.rutgers.edu/forum/showthread.php?t=81606 Please help to share this video by hosting it or posting it. Carlton Television has kindly given us permission to do so. Please Rate this video. Andrew K Fletcher
6 Sep 2007
7760
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3:35
I called one of my friend who previously work in a vet to help us. He is very good in handling dog even bigger ones like Rotweiler. Surprisingly the dog was very calm and let him carried. However he didn't have the time to follow us to the vet and we have to carry him once we reached. As you can see the video, he was awake after a 30 minutes drive. We got some X-ray done and he was injured pretty badly. Please click the X-ray photo to full size. The back leg bone were fractured completely and became like crossing each other. It must have been very painful. I have two option here according to the vet, one is amputate and one is fix him. Since he might be back on the street and since he still have a chance to walk with 4 legs, I will go to the fixing option which is putting a pipe inside and join the bone up. I certainly hope that the man has given him shelter will take in him, I just need to talk him again about this. The dog has to stay in the vet for a month at least and the medical fee will not be cheap. I have to use all Alera fund in this and hopefully I can get some discount from the vet.
11 Sep 2007
956
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1:00
Starlight Starbright Children's Foundation is unveiling Get Fit, Get Right (www.getfitgetright.org), an online program designed to reduce obesity in teens and prevent type 2 diabetes and weight-related conditions such as blindness, amputation, renal failure, hypertension and heart disease. "We need a program like Get Fit, Get Right because over the last few years, I've seen, as so many colleagues across the globe have, an explosion of type 2 diabetes in youth," said Francine Kaufman, M.D., Get Fit, Get Right's medical director and head of the Center for Diabetes and Endocrinology at Children's Hospital Los Angeles. "If we don't intervene, it will lead to devastating health consequences in our children. We need to explain to teenagers in particular that they can do something to prevent this, if they start living a healthy lifestyle today."
24 Oct 2007
639
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1:12
FUJI, a dolphin that lost 75 per cent of her tail due to a mysterious disease, is jumping once again with the help of what is believed to be the world's first artificial fin. The 34-year-old dolphin, held at Japan's largest aquarium on the southern island of Okinawa, wears the rubber fin for about 20 minutes a day, allowing her to jump and swim at the same speed as other dolphins. Fuji was stricken by a mysterious disease causing necrosis - the death of cells - in 2002. Vets had to amputate most of her tail. After the surgery, a vet at the aquarium asked his friend at Bridgestone, Japan's largest tyre-maker, for help. A spokesman for Bridgestone said the most difficult technical challenge was creating rubber with a surface texture smooth enough to avoid scratching the dolphin's skin. The company began working on the fin in 2003, but several samples were either too heavy or loose for the dolphin, which is 2.7m long and weighs 227kg. Researchers used divers and underwater cameras to monitor and record Fuji swimming, continually re-engineering and improving the fin throughout 2004. It was only in August, after Bridgestone created the lightest fin, that Fuji finally jumped.
22 Jun 2009
1507
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