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Man From Plains is an intimate, surprising encounter with President Jimmy Carter. Following the path of Mr. Carter's recent controversial book tour for Palestine Peace Not Apartheid, Academy Award© - winning director Jonthan Demme reveals a complex individual who, with the gusto and determination of a youngster, criss-crosses the country to get his message across, even as that message creates great controversy. Man From Plains explores both the private and public sides of Jimmy Carter, whose intense sense of justice compels him to pursue, with undiminished energy and hope, his lifelong and deeply spiritual vision of reconciliation and peace
18 Apr 2008
239
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1:50
Man From Plains is an intimate, surprising encounter with President Jimmy Carter. Following the path of Mr. Carter's recent controversial book tour for Palestine Peace Not Apartheid, Academy Award© - winning director Jonthan Demme reveals a complex individual who, with the gusto and determination of a youngster, criss-crosses the country to get his message across, even as that message creates great controversy. Man From Plains explores both the private and public sides of Jimmy Carter, whose intense sense of justice compels him to pursue, with undiminished energy and hope, his lifelong and deeply spiritual vision of reconciliation and peace
2 Jun 2010
367
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1:25
Man From Plains is an intimate, surprising encounter with President Jimmy Carter. Following the path of Mr. Carter's recent controversial book tour for Palestine Peace Not Apartheid, Academy Award© - winning director Jonthan Demme reveals a complex individual who, with the gusto and determination of a youngster, criss-crosses the country to get his message across, even as that message creates great controversy. Man From Plains explores both the private and public sides of Jimmy Carter, whose intense sense of justice compels him to pursue, with undiminished energy and hope, his lifelong and deeply spiritual vision of reconciliation and peace
11 Aug 2008
545
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1:47
Man From Plains is an intimate, surprising encounter with President Jimmy Carter. Following the path of Mr. Carter's recent controversial book tour for Palestine Peace Not Apartheid, Academy Award© - winning director Jonthan Demme reveals a complex individual who, with the gusto and determination of a youngster, criss-crosses the country to get his message across, even as that message creates great controversy. Man From Plains explores both the private and public sides of Jimmy Carter, whose intense sense of justice compels him to pursue, with undiminished energy and hope, his lifelong and deeply spiritual vision of reconciliation and peace
22 Apr 2008
359
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1:07
Man From Plains is an intimate, surprising encounter with President Jimmy Carter. Following the path of Mr. Carter's recent controversial book tour for Palestine Peace Not Apartheid, Academy Award© - winning director Jonthan Demme reveals a complex individual who, with the gusto and determination of a youngster, criss-crosses the country to get his message across, even as that message creates great controversy. Man From Plains explores both the private and public sides of Jimmy Carter, whose intense sense of justice compels him to pursue, with undiminished energy and hope, his lifelong and deeply spiritual vision of reconciliation and peace
22 Apr 2008
162
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2:16
Man From Plains is an intimate, surprising encounter with President Jimmy Carter. Following the path of Mr. Carter's recent controversial book tour for Palestine Peace Not Apartheid, Academy Award© - winning director Jonthan Demme reveals a complex individual who, with the gusto and determination of a youngster, criss-crosses the country to get his message across, even as that message creates great controversy. Man From Plains explores both the private and public sides of Jimmy Carter, whose intense sense of justice compels him to pursue, with undiminished energy and hope, his lifelong and deeply spiritual vision of reconciliation and peace
22 Apr 2008
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3:07
Check out this trailer for "The World Unseen", a movie based in the 1950's apartheid era in South Africa. Written and directed by Shamim Sarif, the dramatic film portrays the struggles of two Indian-South African women during this time period.
12 Aug 2008
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2:15
Dutch traders landed at the southern tip of modern day South Africa in 1652 and established a stopover point on the spice route between the Netherlands and the East, founding the city of Cape Town. After the British seized the Cape of Good Hope area in 1806, many of the Dutch settlers (the Boers) trekked north to found their own republics. The discovery of diamonds (1867) and gold (1886) spurred wealth and immigration and intensified the subjugation of the native inhabitants. The Boers resisted British encroachments but were defeated in the Boer War (1899-1902); however, the British and the Afrikaners, as the Boers became known, ruled together under the Union of South Africa. In 1948, the National Party was voted into power and instituted a policy of apartheid - the separate development of the races. The first multi-racial elections in 1994 brought an end to apartheid and ushered in black majority rule. https://www.cia.gov/library/publications/the-world-factbook/geos/sf.html
10 Feb 2011
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6:38
http://www.instablogs.com/ Pakistan President Asif Ali Zardari is visiting China on what is being billed as his first official visit abroad. Pakistan has long seen China as its most reliable friend, in contrast to the United States, whose support has waxed and waned in line with U.S. strategic interests in the region. China, Zardari’s first choice for an official visit Both Pakistan and China have been good friends for more than six decades and have stood with each other through thick and thin. There is nothing unusual about President Zardari’s visit to China since it happens to be the closest and the most reliable friend of Pakistan. The overbearing attitude of United States towards Pakistan especially during the conduct of war on terror and the repeated violations of Pakistan’s sovereignty time and again to serve its own interests has left many in the country infuriated. This, combined with US withering economic clout has left Pakistan with little alternative but to strengthen ties with China. Unlike US, China has consistently supported Pakistan and both have enjoyed mutually beneficial relationship in the past. There is no harm in giving up on past relationships that are no longer fructuous and instead invest in friendships that are more yielding. Today Pakistan’s economy is in utter turmoil we need china’s help to salvage us from the worst economic scenario. Besides together Pakistan and China can also act as counterweight to India which has been an existential threat to us. A research carried out by Media AIDS and Health Watch has revealed that more Malawian children are being exposed to pornographic materials than ever. Most of them are siblings of Commercial Sex Workers (CSW), a section that lets their children watch pornographic films and videos in the name of their profession. Pornigraphy endemic in Malawi A research in Malawi reveals that 21 percent of children whose parents, relatives or guardians own a television set have at one time been exposed to pornographic materials in the past four years. Most of them exposed are siblings of Commercial Sex Workers a sector of Malawi society that let their children watch pornographic films and videos in the name of their profession. For other children, watching takes place in the absence of parents, or any adult, an indication that children are also aware that pornography is not good for their mental growth. Some of these children have gone on to commit sexual offenses, thinking they may not be punished accordingly for their behavior. Concerned authorities in Malawi should work with the Censorship Board to prevent more and more children from getting exposed to pornographic material. Awareness must be raised about the evils of pornography among the sexual workers; the most vulnerable group given the nature of their profession. Brazilian President Luis Ignacio Lula de Silva has signed an agreement to make changes to Portuguese spelling in Brazil. The newly adopted laws aim to simplify spellings by eliminating some ``silent'' letters and accents Brazil adopts changes in Portuguese language Around 250 million people speak Portuguese around the world: Portugal, Angola, Cape Verde, Guinea Bissau, Mozambique, East Timor, Sao Tome and Principe. People around the world have developed their own linguistic variation of Portuguese which has developed a need to unify all these variations and reach some kind of standardization. Several spelling rules will change so that the different variations may become more similar. Both Portugal and Brazil have signed agreements and are ready to enter apply the new rules in the next 2 years. However, this is nothing more than a pressure exerted by large publishers so they can reach new markets. The proposed changes in the majority will not facilitate the learning of language; instead it will only further confuse those who have not mastered the language. The Portuguese is a very difficult language and even the Brazilians can't understand hundreds of grammatical rules. For example, there are 12 verb tenses, each for a specific situation. Finally, things will become even harder if the Brazilians are no longer able to modify the language as and when new rules apply. India Asia's third-largest economy is growing by nearly 9 percent a year driven largely by consumer demand from the middle-class and soaring foreign investment. Despite the boom, recent official data has shown that an estimated 800 million of India's billion-plus people live on 50 U.S. cents a day. Social economic divide in India The luxury mall undoubtedly symbolizes the socio economic divide in modern India. This genre of apartheid is not anew to India. Our ancient and medieval past is stuffed with rotund and self gratifying Maharajas. They indulged in unimaginable luxury and opulence, completely apathetic to the horrifying poverty of their subjects. However, those times were different. The despotic political set up and social beliefs manipulated the popular mindset into accepting their deprivation as the will of providence. What should put modern India to shame is the recurrence of similar division of society into haves and have nots. Ours is a democratic set up that promised equal social and economic opportunities at the time of independence. It is not the which is to be blamed for our growing disparities. It’s the failure to deliver social justice and development to India's poorest regions that have alienated people and helped open up economic,. In a superficially shining India we may count ourselves as no less than anyone else but then it’s our shanty slum which meets the eyes that comes calling to India. http://www.instablogs.com/
29 Apr 2009
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6:04
Prophets Of Da City were the first ever African Hip Hop group to come out of the African continent and step out onto the international stage. The group no longer exist but we caught up with ex lead mc Shaheen at the African Hip Hop conference at Harvard University in Boston for some amazing insight into their story against the backdrop of Apartheid in South Africa.
25 Oct 2008
241
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6:29
Civil disobedience is the active refusal to obey certain laws, demands and commands of a government, or of an occupying power, without resorting to physical violence. It is one of the primary tactics of nonviolent resistance. In its most nonviolent form (known as ahimsa or satyagraha) it could be said that it is compassion in the form of respectful disagreement. Civil disobedience is one of the many ways people have rebelled against unfair laws. It has been used in many well-documented nonviolent resistance movements in India (Gandhi's social welfare campaigns and campaigns for independence from the British Empire), in South Africa in the fight against apartheid, in the American Civil Rights Movement, Jehovah's Witnesses' stand against the Nazis (1929-1945), and in peace movements worldwide. One of its earliest massive implementations was by Egyptians against the British occupation in the nonviolent 1919 Revolution. The American author Henry David Thoreau pioneered the modern theory behind this practice in his 1849 essay Civil Disobedience, originally titled "Resistance to Civil Government". The driving idea behind the essay was that of self-reliance, and how one is in morally good standing as long as one can "get off another man's back"; so one does not have to physically fight the government, but one must not support it or have it support one (if one is against it). This essay has had a wide influence on many later practitioners of civil disobedience. In the essay, Thoreau explained his reasons for having refused to pay taxes as an act of protest against slavery and against the Mexican-American War. The People's Alliance for Democracy (PAD) (Thai: พันธมิตรประชาชนเพื่อประชาธิปไตย; also called the National Liberation Alliance - กลุ่มพันธมิตรกู้ชาติ, the National Liberation Party - พลพรรคกู้ชาติ, and the Yellow Shirts - คนเสื้อเหลือง) was originally a coalition of protesters against Thaksin Shinawatra (ทักษิณ ชินวัตร), the former Prime Minister of Thailand. Its leaders include media-mogul Sondhi Limthongkul (สนธิ ลิ้มทองกุล), Chamlong Srimuang (จำลอง ศรีเมือง),ธhe secretary of the Thailand's Federation of Government Owned Enterprise Labour Somsak Kosaisuuk (สมศักดิ์ โกศัยสุข),The Professor at Nakhon Ratchasima Rajabhat University Somkeit Pongpaibul (สมเกียรติ พงษ์ไพบูลย์), and former ISOC leader Pallop Pinmanee (พิภพ ธงไชย). It was one of the chief players in the Thailand political crisis from 2005 to 2006. The PAD consists of middle and upper-class Bangkokians and Southerners, supported by the conservative elite, factions of the Thai Army, and state-enterprise labor unions.
2 Nov 2008
329
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2:37
Award-winning screenwriter Malla Nunn delivers a stunning and darkly romantic crime novel set in 1950s apartheid South Africa, featuring Detective Emmanuel Cooper -- a man caught up in a time and place where racial tensions and the raw hunger for power make life very dangerous indeed. In a morally complex tale rich with authenticity, Nunn takes readers to Jacob's Rest, a tiny town on the border between South Africa and Mozambique. It is 1952, and new apartheid laws have recently gone into effect, dividing a nation into black and white while supposedly healing the political rifts between the Afrikaners and the English. Tensions simmer as the fault line between the oppressed and the oppressors cuts deeper, but it's not until an Afrikaner police officer is found dead that emotions more dangerous than anyone thought possible boil to the surface. When Detective Emmanuel Cooper, an Englishman, begins investigating the murder, his mission is preempted by the powerful police Security Branch, who are dedicated to their campaign to flush out black communist radicals. But Detective Cooper isn't interested in political expediency and has never been one for making friends. He may be modest, but he radiates intelligence and certainly won't be getting on his knees before those in power. Instead, he strikes out on his own, following a trail of clues that lead him to uncover a shocking forbidden love and the imperfect life of Captain Pretorius, a man whose relationships with the black and coloured residents of the town he ruled were more complicated and more human than anyone could have imagined. The first in her Detective Emmanuel Cooper series, A Beautiful Place to Die marks the debut of a talented writer who reads like a brilliant combination of Raymond Chandler and Graham Greene. It is a tale of murder, passion, corruption, and the corrosive double standard that defined an apartheid nation.
11 Dec 2008
312
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0:37
Israel’s siege of Gaza, largely unseen by the outside world because of Jerusalem’s refusal to allow humanitarian aid workers, reporters and photographers access to Gaza, rivals the most egregious crimes carried out at the height of apartheid by the South African regime. It comes close to the horrors visited on Sarajevo by the Bosnian Serbs. It has disturbing echoes of the Nazi ghettos of Lodz and Warsaw. “This is a stain on what is left of Israeli morality,” I was told by Richard N. Veits, the former U.S. ambassador to Jordan who led a delegation from the U.S. Council for the National Interest Foundation to Gaza to meet Hamas leaders this past summer. “I am almost breathless discussing this subject. It is so myopic. Washington, of course, is a handmaiden to all this. The Israeli manipulation of a population in this manner is comparable to some of the crimes that took place against civilian populations fifty years ago.” The U.N. special rapporteur for human rights in the occupied Palestinian territory, former Princeton University law professor Richard Falk, calls what Israel is doing to the 1.5 million Palestinians in Gaza “a crime against humanity.” Falk, who is Jewish, has condemned the collective punishment of the Palestinians in Gaza as “a flagrant and massive violation of international humanitarian law as laid down in Article 33 of the Fourth Geneva Convention.” He has asked for “the International Criminal Court to investigate the situation, and determine whether the Israeli civilian leaders and military commanders responsible for the Gaza siege should be indicted and prosecuted for violations of international criminal law.” Falk, while condemning the rocket attacks by the militant group Hamas, which he points out are also criminal violations of international law, goes on to say that “such Palestinian behavior does not legalize Israel’s imposition of a collective punishment of a life- and health-threatening character on the people of Gaza, and should not distract the U.N. or international society from discharging their fundamental moral and legal duty to render protection to the Palestinian people.” “It is an unfolding humanitarian catastrophe that each day poses the entire 1.5 million Gazans to an unspeakable ordeal, to a struggle to survive in terms of their health,” Falk said when I reached him by phone in California shortly before he left for Israel. “This is an increasingly precarious condition. A recent study reports that 46 percent of all Gazan children suffer from acute anemia. There are reports that the sonic booms associated with Israeli overflights have caused widespread deafness, especially among children. Gazan children need thousands of hearing aids. Malnutrition is extremely high in a number of different dimensions and affects 75 percent of Gazans. There are widespread mental disorders, especially among young people without the will to live. Over 50 percent of Gazan children under the age of 12 have been found to have no will to live.” Gaza now spends 12 hours a day without power, which can be a death sentence to the severely ill in hospitals. There are few drugs and little medicine, including no cancer or cystic fibrosis medication. Hospitals have generators but often lack fuel. Medical equipment, including one of Gaza’s three CT scanners, has been destroyed by power surges and fluctuations. Medical staff cannot control the temperature of incubators for newborns. And Israel has revoked most exit visas, meaning some of those who need specialized care, including cancer patients and those in need of kidney dialysis, have died. Of the 230 Gazans estimated to have died last year because they were denied proper medical care, several spent their final hours at Israeli crossing points where they were refused entry into Israel. The statistics gathered on children—half of Gaza’s population is under the age of 17—are increasingly grim. About 45 percent of children in Gaza have iron deficiency from a lack of fruit and vegetables, and 18 percent have stunted growth.
2 Jan 2009
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6:52
israel fouls democracy explained. The video is to explain what is going on in the middle east. It is not for commercial purpose, everybody is welcome to re-upload it and shear for non commercial purpose. Free Palestine end the illegal occupation boycott apartheid terror state.
3 Mar 2009
145
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2:12
1662 netherlands alliance with france, ulysses s. grant born 1822 american president, roger hornsby born 1896 baseball player, ralph waldo emerson 1882 philosopher and poet died, edward r. murrow died 1965 journalist, 1956 rocky marciano boxer retired never lost a professional match fighter, 1950 south african apartheid began took effect, on this date in history april 27, history video, historical videos channel - www.myinboxnews.com
27 Apr 2009
230
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3:46
http://www.lulu.com/content/paperback-book/black-dog-bleeding/738296 - steve biko. Steve Biko, civil rights leader and courageous activist. Read about Steve Biko and the struggle to end apartheid.
3 May 2009
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