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The U.S. claims that North Korea is helping Syria build a nuclear reactor. The Syrians claim that the Israeli Prime Minster has made an offer to withdraw from the Golan Heights. Is there truth in any of these reports? And why would Assad make overtures for peace?
18 Sep 2008
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9:39
syrian first lady
9 Aug 2008
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0:03
Video Digital
7 Apr 2009
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0:03
Video de Imagenes digitales
7 Apr 2009
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11:36
A Muslim Journey to Hope presents the true stories of people who have had a life-changing experience. Each story is true, and each story is different. Yet they are as different as the lives of each person: Women and men. Young and old. Rich and poor. From many countries in the world. But each story tells how each of these people has found hope.
9 Feb 2010
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2:09
Manuel Barrueco: A Gift and a Life - Documentary available on DVD - Michael Lawrence Films - *******www.mlfilms****/ - Featuring: Manuel Barrueco, Placido Domingo, Assad David Russell Tanenbaum Eliot Fisk mlfilms Michael Lawrence Films Andy Summers Al Di Meola and Franco Platino. - Metacafe Clip Authorized by MLF - Michael Lawrence Films - *******www.mlfilms****/
8 Jan 2007
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1:17
Emir, Amina, Haji och Assad är alla medlemmar i hip-hop gruppen Forente Minoriteter. Filmen följer dem genom den musikaliska processen, med alla dess uppgångar och nedgångar. Filmens regissör har följt gruppen över två år, vilket resulterar i ett intimt möte med några riktigt charmiga och öppna ungdomar. De är alla olika men hittar en gemensam plattform i deras passion för musiken, men inte minst genom att de hittar sin egen plats och identitet bland alla motstridiga krav från vänner, familj och det norska samhället. 99 % Ärlig är en film som berättar historien om en bit av det moderna Norge på ett oväntat, varmt, förutsättningslöst och rörande sätt. Rune Denstad Langlo (1972). Är producent och regissör på produktionsbolaget Motlys AS. Genom hans dokumentärer har han visat sig vara en skicklig historieberättare, och han har visat att han kan skildra karaktärer på ett trovärdigt vis. Hans första långfilm, Nord hade norsk biopremiär i februari 2009.
7 Aug 2009
151
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1:17
Emir, Amina, Haji och Assad är alla medlemmar i hip-hop gruppen Forente Minoriteter. Filmen följer dem genom den musikaliska processen, med alla dess uppgångar och nedgångar. Filmens regissör har följt gruppen över två år, vilket resulterar i ett intimt möte med några riktigt charmiga och öppna ungdomar. De är alla olika men hittar en gemensam plattform i deras passion för musiken, men inte minst genom att de hittar sin egen plats och identitet bland alla motstridiga krav från vänner, familj och det norska samhället. 99 % Ärlig är en film som berättar historien om en bit av det moderna Norge på ett oväntat, varmt, förutsättningslöst och rörande sätt. Rune Denstad Langlo (1972). Är producent och regissör på produktionsbolaget Motlys AS. Genom hans dokumentärer har han visat sig vara en skicklig historieberättare, och han har visat att han kan skildra karaktärer på ett trovärdigt vis. Hans första långfilm, Nord hade norsk biopremiär i februari 2009.
19 Sep 2009
122
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1:17
Emir, Amina, Haji och Assad är alla medlemmar i hip-hop gruppen Forente Minoriteter. Filmen följer dem genom den musikaliska processen, med alla dess uppgångar och nedgångar. Filmens regissör har följt gruppen över två år, vilket resulterar i ett intimt möte med några riktigt charmiga och öppna ungdomar. De är alla olika men hittar en gemensam plattform i deras passion för musiken, men inte minst genom att de hittar sin egen plats och identitet bland alla motstridiga krav från vänner, familj och det norska samhället. 99 % Ärlig är en film som berättar historien om en bit av det moderna Norge på ett oväntat, varmt, förutsättningslöst och rörande sätt. Rune Denstad Langlo (1972). Är producent och regissör på produktionsbolaget Motlys AS. Genom hans dokumentärer har han visat sig vara en skicklig historieberättare, och han har visat att han kan skildra karaktärer på ett trovärdigt vis. Hans första långfilm, Nord hade norsk biopremiär i februari 2009.
19 Jul 2011
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1:39
BY YIQIAN ZHANG ANCHOR AUSTIN KIM You're watching multisource world news analysis from Newsy. Over the weekend, several thousand Syrians gathered to demonstrate against the government, and at least five people were killed when the military broke up the protests with gunfire and tear gas. The protests were sparked by the arrest of 15 children for writing revolutionary slogans on walls. (Video: euronews) Mourners called for “revolution” at the funeral of slain protesters. What will happen now? A writer for the Israeli paper Haaretz says Syrian protests could lead to reforms, but the government could also squash the uprising before it gains steam. “Contrary to what Assad has boasted, his country is not immune to the cries for change that have already toppled leaders in Egypt and Tunisia. But Syria's leadership, like that of Libya or Yemen, has no intention of relinquishing power. The question is how quickly the security forces will act…" A journalist from the region writes in Time Magazine- it will be difficult for Syrians to force the government to change, but there’s hope. “Syria was always going to be a tough nut for pro-democracy activists to crack. It is a country where NGOs and political parties … have long been banned; and where dissent, however mild, is viciously crushed … The barrier of fear Syrians must surmount is significant … but then again … so too are the opportunities.” An American Thinker blogger suggests the US challenge Syrian leader Bashar al Assad and lead a push for reform. “…from the standpoint of U.S. strategic interests, Assad's Syria … is arguably a bigger menace than Qaddafi's Libya.” The Syrian government is using a carrot-and-stick strategy to quell the protests -- following brute force with concessions, such as releasing combination the 15 arrested children and cutting the length of mandatory military service by three months. Follow Newsy_Videos on Twitter Get more multisource video news analysis from Newsy Transcript by Newsy
22 Mar 2011
240
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2:32
BY: SAMANTHA MCCLENDON ANCHOR: CHANCE SEALES You're watching multisource world news analysis from Newsy First it said yes -- then no -- now maybe. The Arab League says it fully supports the no-fly zone over Libya after first expressing uncertainty on Sunday. That -- after the League made the first call for a no-fly zone -- back on March 12th. “Today, the head of the Arab League criticized the international mission saying the strikes have gone beyond what the league had supported.” AMR MOUSSA: “What happened differs from the no-fly zone objectives. What we want is protection of civilians’ protection, not shelling more civilians.” info: WAGA FOX Now, Amr Moussa is clearing things up. He tells the Los Angeles Times he believes civilian protection is a unanimous goal for the U.N. and The Arab League. “‘‘[The Arab League] respects the U.N. Security Council resolution, and there is no contradiction.’” The confusion might be understandable says The Atlantic’s Jeffrey Goldberg. After all, the Arab League represents a pretty disparate crowd -- and not one that traditionally aligns with the West. “Does anyone believe that the Arab League, whose members include Bashar al-Assad, the Saud family, Yemen's Ali Abdullah Saleh, Muammar Qaddafi ...and until a few weeks ago Tunisia's Ben Ali and Egypt's Mubarak, is a force for progressive politics and humanitarianism? That it would ever stand with the West when it was uncomfortable to stand with the West?” A reporter for NBC’s Today Show says that might explain why Moussa’s opinion appears to differ depending on which reporter you ask. JIM MACEDA: “Amr Moussa’s negative comments by the way were made in Arabic to an Egyptian journalist, but he sounded much more supportive when asked the same question and replied to the same question in English.” But a writer for Yahoo! News argues- the Arab League wants to have its cake and eat it too. “The Arab League can't have it both ways; it can't ask for help and then decry the deaths of civilians when Western air forces implement the no-fly zone.” And a blogger for American Thinker adds the Arab League is just being two-faced. “The Arab League has the staying power of a soap bubble. In 48 hours they will be calling themselves for a cease fire. And it should be noted, that nowhere in their statement urging a no fly zone did they mention regime change in Libya.” But hold on a second- writes Kevin Drum for Mother Jones- Moussa has a right to be hesitant about the no-fly zone. Operation Odyssey Dawn has turned out to be one heck of a military assault. “This may or may not be necessary to accomplish whatever it is that the coalition is trying to accomplish (that's less than clear at the moment), but it really does go pretty far beyond what the Arab League thought it was signing up for.” The Washington Post reports the Arab League may hold a meeting to discuss the no-fly zone. Follow Newsy_Videos on Twitter Get more multisource video news analysis from Newsy Transcript by Newsy
22 Mar 2011
345
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2:54
BY CHRISTINA HARTMAN You're watching multisource world news analysis from Newsy Amid the worst unrest it’s seen in decades - the government of Syria has resigned. That as President Bashar al Assad is widely expected to lift the country’s emergency law -- in place for almost 50 years. That’s the latest of the moves intended to appease protesters who’ve taken to the streets in recent weeks. Mr. Assad remains the national authority - but Al Jazeera reports protesters don’t expect the cabinet resignation to be the last concession. “This is expected to be a step in a series of steps people are expecting the president to announce to bring reform to Syria. And as officials here have been promising, to meet the demands of the protesters.” Other concessions already offered up, Mr. al-Assad has said he’d release some political prisoners, allow greater media freedom, and permit political parties. But a Middle East expert tells RT, he only intends to do the “bare minimum” to placate unrest -- and that might not end up being enough. “But we’ve seen that in other places before. Yes Syria is unique; it’s not exactly the same as Egypt or Tunisia, but too little to late actually seems to fuel the momentum of the demonstrators who feel insulted by the idea that you just have to tell them, there, there, go away. We’ll look after it, we’ll make some changes, but we know what’s best.” The BBC’s Jim Muir agrees, and he casts doubt on Mr. Assad’s ability to survive the upheaval. “No two Arab countries are the same, though they suffer from similar malaises. But if President Assad's Syria does manage to foster enough peaceful internal change and reform to defuse a popular uprising, it will be a first.” France 24 notes - Assad has his supporters - who turned out en masse Tuesday for a PRO-government counter-rally. “This fits with the fact that Assad enjoys a certain amount of popularity for opening up Syria economically. Cell phones, satellite television, high tech goods that changed people’s lives. these didn’t exist under the Syria under his father, who died in 2000.” Contrast that to Fox News’ Leland Vittert - on the ground in Syria - who points out video of those pro-government supporters was put out by state TV. Vittert casts a more skeptical light on Mr. Assad’s sincerity. “The other issue is to try and get independent journalists into Syria. We had a presidential advisor come out on television and say, all journalist are welcome, we'll grant visas immediately, apply. So far the promise has not been fulfilled by the Syrian government.” Mr. Assad is expected to deliver a televised address Wednesday. The Guardian’s Simon Tisdall says it’ll be his, quote, “day of reckoning.” “Whatever the reasons, and they are many, Assad faces a great reckoning when he steps up to speak. It could be a moment of unparalleled opportunity. Or it could prove to be a fatal next phase in his inexorable fall from grace.” Follow Newsy_Videos on Twitter Get more multisource video news analysis from Newsy Transcript by Newsy
5 Apr 2011
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