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1:41
What is a Bunion? - Podiatrist in Annapolis, MD Dr. James McKee discusses the symptoms, causes and treatment for bunions. http://www.podiatrygroup.us A bunion is a bone deformity caused by an enlargement of the joint at the base and side of the big toe (metatarsophalangeal joint). Bunions form when the toe moves out of place. The enlargement and its protuberance cause friction and pressure as they rub against footwear. Over time, the movement of the big toe angles in toward the other toes, sometimes overlapping a third toe (known as Hallux Valgus). The growing enlargement or protuberance then causes more irritation or inflammation. In some cases, the big toe moves toward the second toe and rotates or twists, which is known as Hallus Abducto Valgus. Bunions can also lead to other toe deformities, such as hammertoe. Many people with bunions suffer from discomfort and pain from the constant irritation, rubbing, and friction of the enlargement against shoes. The skin over the toe becomes red and tender. Because this joint flexes with every step, the bigger the bunion gets, the more it hurts to walk. Over time, bursitis or arthritis may set in, the skin on the bottom of the foot may become thicker, and everyday walking may become difficult—all contributing to chronic pain. Wearing shoes that are too tight is the leading cause of bunions. Bunions are not hereditary, but they do tend to run in families, usually because of a faulty foot structure. Foot injuries, neuromuscular problems, flat feet, and pronated feet can contribute to their formation. It is estimated that bunions occur in 33 percent of the population in Western countries. Treatment for Bunions Because they are bone deformities, bunions do not resolve by themselves. The goal for bunion treatment is twofold: first, to relieve the pressure and pain cause by irritations, and second to stop any progressive growth of the enlargement. Commonly used methods for reducing pressure and pain caused by bunions include: •The use of protective padding, often made from felt material, to eliminate the friction against shoes and help alleviate inflammation and skin problems. •Removal of corns and calluses on the foot. •Changing to carefully-fitted footwear designed to accommodate the bunion and not contribute toward its growth. •Orthotic devices—both over-the-counter and custom made—to help stabilize the joint and place the foot in the correct position for walking and standing. •Exercises to maintain joint mobility and prevent stiffness or arthritis. •Splints for nighttime wear to help the toes and joint align properly. This is often recommended for adolescents with bunions, because their bone development may still be adaptable. Surgical Treatment Depending on the size of the enlargement, misalignment of the toe, and pain experienced, conservative treatments may not be adequate to prevent progressive damage from bunions. In these cases, bunion surgery, known as a bunionectomy, may be advised to remove the bunion and realign the toe. Visit our website: http://www.podiatrygroup.us
13 Jul 2011
106
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1:33
Ingrown Toenails Treatment - Podiatrist in Annapolis, MD Patient discusses treatment received by Dr. James McKee for an ingrown toenail. http://www.podiatrygroup.us Ingrown toenails, also known as onychocryptosis, is usually caused by trimming toenails too short, particularly on the sides of the big toes. They may also be caused by shoe pressure (from shoes that are too tight or short), injury, fungus infection, heredity, or poor foot structure. Ingrown toenails occur when the corners or sides of the toenail dig into the skin, often causing infection. A common ailment, ingrown toenails can be painful. Ingrown toenails start out hard, swollen, and tender. Left untreated, they may become sore, red, and infected and the skin may start to grow over the ingrown toenail. In most cases, treating ingrown toenails is simple: soak the foot in warm, soapy water several times each day. Avoid wearing tight shoes or socks. Antibiotics are sometimes prescribed if an infection is present. Note: Please consult your physician before taking any medications. In severe cases, if an acute infection occurs, surgical removal of part of the ingrown toenail may be needed. Known as partial nail plate avulsion, the procedure involves injecting the toe with an anesthetic and cutting out the ingrown part of the toenail. Ingrown toenails can be prevented by: •Trimming toenails straight across with no rounded corners. •Ensuring that shoes and socks are not too tight. •Keeping feet clean at all times. Visit our website: http://www.podiatrygroup.us
13 Jul 2011
168
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0:49
Ingrown Toenails - Podiatrist in Annapolis, MD Dr. James McKee discusses the symptoms, causes and treatment for ingrown toenails. http://www.podiatrygroup.us Ingrown toenails, also known as onychocryptosis, is usually caused by trimming toenails too short, particularly on the sides of the big toes. They may also be caused by shoe pressure (from shoes that are too tight or short), injury, fungus infection, heredity, or poor foot structure. Ingrown toenails occur when the corners or sides of the toenail dig into the skin, often causing infection. A common ailment, ingrown toenails can be painful. Ingrown toenails start out hard, swollen, and tender. Left untreated, they may become sore, red, and infected and the skin may start to grow over the ingrown toenail. In most cases, treating ingrown toenails is simple: soak the foot in warm, soapy water several times each day. Avoid wearing tight shoes or socks. Antibiotics are sometimes prescribed if an infection is present. Note: Please consult your physician before taking any medications. In severe cases, if an acute infection occurs, surgical removal of part of the ingrown toenail may be needed. Known as partial nail plate avulsion, the procedure involves injecting the toe with an anesthetic and cutting out the ingrown part of the toenail. Ingrown toenails can be prevented by: •Trimming toenails straight across with no rounded corners. •Ensuring that shoes and socks are not too tight. •Keeping feet clean at all times.
14 Jul 2011
125
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0:55
What is a Bunion - Podiatry in Stratford, Turnersville and Swedesboro, NJ Dr. Kenneth Sebastian discusses the symptoms, causes and treatment for bunions. http://academypodiatry.com A bunion is a bone deformity caused by an enlargement of the joint at the base and side of the big toe (metatarsophalangeal joint). Bunions form when the toe moves out of place. The enlargement and its protuberance cause friction and pressure as they rub against footwear. Over time, the movement of the big toe angles in toward the other toes, sometimes overlapping a third toe (known as Hallux Valgus). The growing enlargement or protuberance then causes more irritation or inflammation. In some cases, the big toe moves toward the second toe and rotates or twists, which is known as Hallus Abducto Valgus. Bunions can also lead to other toe deformities, such as hammertoe. Many people with bunions suffer from discomfort and pain from the constant irritation, rubbing, and friction of the enlargement against shoes. The skin over the toe becomes red and tender. Because this joint flexes with every step, the bigger the bunion gets, the more it hurts to walk. Over time, bursitis or arthritis may set in, the skin on the bottom of the foot may become thicker, and everyday walking may become difficult—all contributing to chronic pain. Wearing shoes that are too tight is the leading cause of bunions. Bunions are not hereditary, but they do tend to run in families, usually because of a faulty foot structure. Foot injuries, neuromuscular problems, flat feet, and pronated feet can contribute to their formation. It is estimated that bunions occur in 33 percent of the population in Western countries. Treatment for Bunions Because they are bone deformities, bunions do not resolve by themselves. The goal for bunion treatment is twofold: first, to relieve the pressure and pain cause by irritations, and second to stop any progressive growth of the enlargement. Commonly used methods for reducing pressure and pain caused by bunions include: •The use of protective padding, often made from felt material, to eliminate the friction against shoes and help alleviate inflammation and skin problems. •Removal of corns and calluses on the foot. •Changing to carefully-fitted footwear designed to accommodate the bunion and not contribute toward its growth. •Orthotic devices—both over-the-counter and custom made—to help stabilize the joint and place the foot in the correct position for walking and standing. •Exercises to maintain joint mobility and prevent stiffness or arthritis. •Splints for nighttime wear to help the toes and joint align properly. This is often recommended for adolescents with bunions, because their bone development may still be adaptable. Surgical Treatment Depending on the size of the enlargement, misalignment of the toe, and pain experienced, conservative treatments may not be adequate to prevent progressive damage from bunions. In these cases, bunion surgery, known as a bunionectomy, may be advised to remove the bunion and realign the toe. Visit our website: http://academypodiatry.com
3 Aug 2011
128
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5:06
http://podiatristelpasotx.com Podiatrist El Paso TX, Dr. Gary Grindstaff, speaks about benefits of orthotics. Orthotics are orthopedic devices that are used to treat a variety of disorders. When a person feet are not working properly. Dr. Mary Carlson mentions that the purpose of orthotics is to correct the shape and function of the body to provide easier movement capability and reduce pain. There are different types of orthotics. Orthotics help correct and stabilize bunions and hammer toes, arch pains, when the big toe does not bend and when a person gets shooting electrical pain in the foot. There are orthotics that can help young kids in their walking in the early stage when they are pigeon toed. However orthotics can be customized, and made to fulfill, the need of every patient. To see more videos, please click on the following link: http://www.youtube.com/user/PodiatristElPaso Dr. Gary Grindstaff, Foot Doctor in El Paso TX, also serves the cities of: El Paso, San Elizario and the zip codes of : 79936, 79935, 79925, 79907, 79915, 79918, 79910, 79905, 79906, ....
10 Aug 2011
131
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1:45
http://curegoutpainnow.com - What is gout pain? Gout pain is usually described by sufferers as intense pain in their joints. This usually first happens in the big toe.
17 Aug 2011
84
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1:50
http://curegoutpainnow.com - Gout is caused by high levels of uric acid in the blood resulting to pain in the big toe and other joints.
17 Aug 2011
164
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2:01
http://curegoutpainnow.com - Acute gout is characterized by the sudden development of pain in the joints, often the big toe, elbow or ankle
17 Aug 2011
69
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3:16
Bunion Foot Care - NYC Podiatrist Manhattan and White Plains, NY Dr. Jeff Adler discusses the symptoms, causes and treatments for bunions. http://www.adlerfootcare.com Bunions - misaligned big toe joints that can become swollen and tender, causing the first joint of the big toe to slant outward, and the second joint to angle toward the other toes. Bunions tend to be hereditary, but can be aggravated by shoes that are too narrow in the forefoot and toe. Surgery is frequently performed to correct the problem. At Adler Footcare we offer a full array of podiatric services to help you maintain healthy feet. Whether you are dealing with an irritating ongoing condition or an injury that needs to be resolved, we can help you have beautiful and healthy feet. One of our core specialties is surgery, with a fully accredited Podiatric OR in our Midtown Manhattan office. Dr. Adler is one of 12 Professors of Minimally Invasive Foot Surgery of the Academy of Ambulatory Foot and Ankle Surgeons and he is one of only several podiatrists in the country who performs minimally-invasive podiatric surgery so patients enjoy significantly reduced recovery times. Dr. Adler is Board Certified in both Podiatric Surgery and Primary Podiatric Medicine by the American Board of Multiple Specialties in Podiatry. Visit our website : http://www.adlerfootcare.com
23 Aug 2011
155
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1:53
Treatment of Ingrown Toenail - NYC Podiatrist Manhattan and White Plains, NY Dr. Jeff Adler discusses the symptoms, causes and treatments for Ingrown Toenail. Ingrown toenails, also known as onychocryptosis, is usually caused by trimming toenails too short, particularly on the sides of the big toes. They may also be caused by shoe pressure (from shoes that are too tight or short), injury, fungus infection, heredity, or poor foot structure. Ingrown toenails occur when the corners or sides of the toenail dig into the skin, often causing infection. A common ailment, ingrown toenails can be painful. Ingrown toenails start out hard, swollen, and tender. Left untreated, they may become sore, red, and infected and the skin may start to grow over the ingrown toenail. In most cases, treating ingrown toenails is simple: soak the foot in warm, soapy water several times each day. Avoid wearing tight shoes or socks. Antibiotics are sometimes prescribed if an infection is present. Note: Please consult your physician before taking any medications. In severe cases, if an acute infection occurs, surgical removal of part of the ingrown toenail may be needed. Known as partial nail plate avulsion, the procedure involves injecting the toe with an anesthetic and cutting out the ingrown part of the toenail. Ingrown toenails can be prevented by: • Trimming toenails straight across with no rounded corners. • Ensuring that shoes and socks are not too tight. • Keeping feet clean at all times. Visit our website: http://www.adlerfootcare.com
23 Aug 2011
158
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1:14
Treatment for Ankle Arthritis - San Francisco Podiatrist Union Square CA Dr. Bill Metaxas discusses the symptoms, causes and treatments for Ankle Arthritis. http://www.footankleinstitutesf.com OSTEOARTHRITIS OF THE FOOT AND ANKLE What is Osteoarthritis? Osteoarthritis is a condition characterized by the breakdown and eventual loss of cartilage in one or more joints. Cartilage-the connective tissue found at the end of the bones in the joints-protects and cushions the bones during movement. When cartilage deteriorates or is lost, symptoms develop that can restrict one's ability to easily perform daily activities. Osteoarthritis is also known as degenerative arthritis, reflecting its nature to develop as part of the aging process. As the most common form of arthritis, osteoarthritis affects millions of Americans. Many people refer to osteoarthritis simply as arthritis, even though there are more than 100 different types of arthritis. Osteoarthritis appears at various joints throughout the body, including the hands, feet, spine, hips, and knees. In the foot, the disease most frequently occurs in the big toe, although it is also often found in the midfoot and ankle. Signs and Symptoms People with osteoarthritis in the foot or ankle experience, in varying degrees, one or more of the following: • Pain and stiffness in the joint • Swelling in or near the joint • Difficulty walking or bending the joint • Some patients with osteoarthritis also develop a bone spur (a bony protrusion) at the affected joint. Shoe pressure may cause pain at the site of a bone spur, and in some cases blisters or calluses may form over the surface of the bone spur. Bone spurs can also limit the movement of the joint. Causes Osteoarthritis is considered a wear and tear disease because the cartilage in the joint wears down with repeated stress and use over time. As the cartilage deteriorates and gets thinner, the bones lose their protective covering and eventually may rub together, causing pain and inflammation of the joint. An injury may also lead to osteoarthritis, although it may take months or years after the injury for the condition to develop. For example, osteoarthritis in the big toe is often caused by kicking or jamming the toe, or by dropping something on the toe. Osteoarthritis in the midfoot is also often caused by dropping something on it, or by a sprain or fracture. In the ankle, osteoarthritis is usually caused by a fracture and occasionally by a severe sprain. Sometimes osteoarthritis develops as a result of abnormal foot mechanics. People who have flat feet or high arches are at increased risk for developing osteoarthritis in the foot. A flat foot causes less stability in the ligaments (bands of tissue that connect bones), resulting in excessive strain on the joints, which can cause arthritis. A high arch is rigid and lacks mobility, causing a jamming of joints that creates an increased risk of arthritis. Diagnosis In diagnosing osteoarthritis, the foot and ankle surgeon will examine the foot thoroughly, looking for swelling in the joint, limited mobility, and pain with movement. In some cases, deformity and/or enlargement (spur) of the joint may be noted. In addition to the foot examination, x-rays may be ordered to help the doctor diagnose osteoarthritis and evaluate the extent of the disease in the foot and ankle. Treatment: Non-Surgical Options To help relieve symptoms, the surgeon may begin treating osteoarthritis with one or more non-surgical approaches. When is Surgery Needed? If non-surgical treatment fails to adequately reduce the pain associated with osteoarthritis, surgery may be recommended. The goal of surgery is to decrease pain and improve function. The foot and ankle surgeon will consider a number of factors when selecting the procedure best suited to the patient's condition and lifestyle. Visit our website: http://www.footankleinstitutesf.com
26 Aug 2011
159
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1:00
Treatment for Bunions and Hammertoes - San Francisco Podiatrist Union Square CA Dr. Bill Metaxas discusses the symptoms, causes and treatments of Bunions and Hammertoes. http://www.footankleinstitutesf.com What Causes a Bunion? A bunion is a prominence on the side of the foot by the big toe joint. The big toe may also be leaning over towards the smaller toes.You are usually born with the foot type that predisposes you to bunions. People with flat feet or really flexible feet are more prone to develop problems with bunions. Other causes are injury, rheumatoid arthritis and neurovascular disease. Over time, the mechanics of your foot and shoe gear increases the deformity of the bunion. Woman are more frequently affected, probably because of the types of shoes they wear. What Causes Hammer Toes and Claw Toes? The most common toe deformities are hammer toes, claw toes, and bone spurs. These involve the lesser toes (2nd through 5th toes). In a hammer toe, the toe is bent at the middle knuckle of the toe, while in a claw toe the toe is bent at both the middle knuckle and tip of the toe. A bone spur can occur anywhere on the toes but most commonly affects the 4th and 5th toes. Each of the deformities can create corns on the toes and in more severe cases redness, swelling, and even an open sore can develop. It is important to note that the corns are not a skin problem! They develop because the skin is being crushed and irritated between the bones in your toes and your shoe. You are usually born with the foot type that predisposes you to hammer and claw toes. People with flat feet, high-arched feet, or really flexible feet are more prone to develop these problems. Other causes are excessively long toes, tendon imbalance, injury, rheumatoid arthritis, and neuromuscular disease. Over time, the mechanics of your foot and shoe gear increases the deformities. Women are more frequently affected, probably because of the type of shoe they wear and the use of tight stockings. Visit our website: http://www.footankleinstitutesf.com
26 Aug 2011
147
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0:48
Bunion Surgery - San Francisco Podiatrist Union Square CA Dr. Bill Metaxas discusses the symptoms, causes and treatments of Bunions. http://www.footankleinstitutesf.com BUNIONS What Causes a Bunion? A bunion is a prominence on the side of the foot by the big toe joint. The big toe may also be leaning over towards the smaller toes.You are usually born with the foot type that predisposes you to bunions. People with flat feet or really flexible feet are more prone to develop problems with bunions. Other causes are injury, rheumatoid arthritis and neurovascular disease. Over time, the mechanics of your foot and shoe gear increases the deformity of the bunion. Woman are more frequently affected, probably because of the types of shoes they wear. What are the Symptoms? The severity of the deformity may not correlate to the degree of pain. For example, a bunion that looks severe may have no pain; while a mild looking bunion may be incapacitating. Pain usually develops over the large prominence due to the friction of the shoe in that area. This rubbing of the shoe may cause a red, inflamed sac of tissue called bursitis. As time goes on pain may develop deep in this joint, limiting walking, exercise or even just standing comfortably. High heeled or pointed shoes will exacerbate these symptoms. When the joint has been in a mal-aligned position for many years, osteoarthritis will develop. Arthritis causes increased stiffness and pain within the joint. Bunions may also effect the adjacent smaller toes. When the big toes start to angle over, the big toe may cause increased pressure on the second toe or the second toe may be pushed upwards out of the way. This causes hammertoes and/or callouses on the lesser toes. What are the Treatment Options? When bunions are causing mild to moderate pain, the simplest solution to try is a wider, more accommodating shoe. This includes lower heels, softer leather, wider toe boxes and gym shoes. Cushions may provide relief from shoe pressure over the prominence. Anti-inflammatory medication may also provide relief. When the bunion is painful despite the conservative therapy options or you cannot find shoes that are comfortable, surgical correction should be discussed with your podiatric physician. The longer surgery is delayed in a symptomatic foot, the greater the amount of arthritis that develops, and the more complicated the surgery becomes. Patients who have their symptomatic bunion corrected earlier tend to have greater satisfaction after the procedure. What Does Surgery Involve? The goal of surgical correction is to restore normal alignment and function of the great toe joint. The large bony prominence is removed and a cut is made in the bone to move it back into a normal position. Screws and/or pins may be used to hold the bone in proper position. If the joint is destroyed from arthritis beyond repair, it may need to be replaced with an artificial joint. Following surgery, the foot is bandaged and a post operative shoe is worn for one week. Athletic shoes may be worn after the first week. Exercise and prolonged standing are restricted for the first 6-8 weeks. A home exercise program is important for regaining the strength and flexibility. You may steadily resume activities and wear more fashionable shoe gear as healing occurs. Visit our website: http://www.footankleinstitutesf.com
26 Aug 2011
228
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0:50
Bunion Treatment - Podiatrist in Chandler, Sun Lakes and Phoenix, AZ Dr Alan Discont discusses the symptoms, causes and treatments for bunions. http://www.chandlerfootandanklecare.com Bunions (Hallux Valgus) Bunions are misaligned big toe joints that can become swollen and tender, causing the first joint of the big toe to slant outward, and the second joint to angle toward the other toes. Bunions tend to be hereditary, but can be aggravated by shoes that are too narrow in the forefoot and toe. Surgery by a podiatric physician is frequently recommended to correct the problem. Visit our website: http://www.chandlerfootandanklecare.com
30 Aug 2011
160
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1:07
Calluses Treatment - Podiatrist in Chandler, Sun Lakes and Phoenix, AZ Dr Alan Discont discusses the symptoms, causes and treatments for calluses. http://www.chandlerfootandanklecare.com A callus is an area of hard, thickened skin that can occur across the ball of the foot, on the heel, or on the outer side of the big toe. While many consider them a skin problem, they actually are systemic of a problem with the bone. Calluses have painful nerves and bursal sacs (fluid-filled balloons that act as shock absorbers) beneath them, causing symptoms ranging from sharp, shooting pain to dull, aching soreness. Calluses form from repeated friction and pressure, as the shoe (or ground) rubs against a bony prominence (bone spur) on the toe or foot. The skin thickens in response to this pressure. Small amounts of friction or pressure over long periods of time cause a corn or callus. A great deal of friction or pressure over shorter periods of time can cause blisters or open sores. Calluses typically develop under a metatarsal head (the long bone that forms the ball of the foot) that is carrying more than its fair share of the body weight, usually due to it being dropped down or due to its longer length. Calluses can be treated with over-the-counter callus removers that have strong acids that peel this excess skin away after repeated application. You should be careful with these products as they can cause chemical burns when not used correctly. Begin by soaking your feet in warm soapy water and gently rubbing away any dead skin that loosens. A pumice stone or emery board is then used to file this thickened skin. Apply a good moisturizer to the hardened areas to keep them softer and relieve pain. Non-medicated corn pads or moleskin (a thin fuzzy sheet of fabric with an adhesive back) can relieve calluses, but should be removed carefully to avoid tearing the skin. If you need assistance relieving calluses, contact our office. Calluses can be trimmed and comfortable padding applied to these painful areas. In addition to medication to relieve inflammation, cortisone may be injected into the underlying bursal sac to rapidly reduce pain and swelling. A plantar callus forms when one metatarsal bone is longer or lower than the others, and it hits the ground first-and with more force than it is equipped to handle-at every step. As a result, the skin under this bone thickens like a rock in your shoe. Plantar calluses that are recurring are sometimes removed surgically in a procedure called an osteotomy, which relieves pressure on the bone. A condition called Intractable Plantar Keratosis (IPK) is a deep callus directly under the ball of the foot. IPK is caused by a dropped metatarsal, which happens when the metatarsal head drops to a lower level than the surrounding metatarsals and protrudes from the bottom of the foot. This results in more pressure being applied in this area and causes a thick callus to form. A dropped metatarsal can either be a congenital abnormality, a result of a metatarsal fracture, or a structural change that may have occurred over time. How to prevent calluses: • Switch to better shoes, or even an orthotic device. • Buy socks with double-thick toes and heels and nylon hose with a woven cotton sole on the bottom of the foot. Visit our website: http://www.chandlerfootandanklecare.co
30 Aug 2011
279
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0:29
Ingrown ToenailsTreatment - Podiatrist in Chandler, Sun Lakes and Phoenix, AZ Dr Alan Discont discusses the symptoms, causes and treatments for Ingrown Toenails. http://www.chandlerfootandanklecare.com Ingrown toenails often are the result of trimming your toenails too short, particularly on the sides of your big toes. While they are common, ingrown toenails can be painful. When trimming your nails, avoid tapering the corners so that the nail curves with the shape of your toe. The sides of the nail will curl down and dig into your skin. Shoes that are too tight or short also may cause ingrown toenails. Ingrown toenail start out hard, swollen and tender, and later, may become sore, red and infected. Your skin may start to grow over the ingrown toenail. Soaking your foot in warm, soapy water several times each day is usually a good way to treat an ingrown nail. Also, you can try inserting some cotton or waxed dental floss between the nail and your skin. Please contact our office to determine the best course of treatment for your condition. Antibiotics are sometimes prescribed if an infection is present. Part of your ingrown toenail (partial nail plate avulsion) may need to be surgically removed if an acute infection occurs. The procedure involves injecting the toe with an anesthetic and cutting out the ingrown part of the toenail. You can prevent ingrown toenails by: • Trimming your toenails straight across with no rounded corners. • Ensuring that your shoes and socks are not too tight. • Keeping your feet clean at all times. Visit our website: http://www.chandlerfootandanklecare.com
30 Aug 2011
81
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