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How to Deal With Stage 3 Colon Cancer|colorectal cancer survival by stage It is best to treat colon cancer, also known as colorectal cancer, in its early stages. There are 5 stages of colon cancer, ranging from 0 to 4. Stage 3, Dukes C colon cancer, is one of the more advanced stages. In it, tumors have spread beyond the colon to the lymph nodes. Stage 3 is divided into 3 subgroups. These subgroups range from least to most advanced with a survival rate ranging from 44 to 83 percent. Your doctor and cancer team will explain what this stage means, answer questions, provide treatment options and help you determine which plan will work best for you. 1 Deal with stage 3 colon cancer in steps. Try not to get ahead of yourself by looking at the entire picture. 2 Admit that you are sick. This is the first step in accepting and coping with a diagnosis of stage 3 colon cancer. It takes time to process this information and the new emotions you're feeling. You may become a little overwhelmed, frightened or anxious. These are normal feelings, so allow yourself a little time.
26 Sep 2017
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How to Prevent colon cancer clinical trials Colon cancer, or colorectal cancer, is malignant cell growth in the lower large intestine, colon, and rectum. It has the potential to spread to other organs, making it a very dangerous form of cancer. Fortunately, early detection is possible with regular screening. In addition, there are a number of lifestyle and dietary changes you can make to lower your risk of developing colon cancer. 1 Take risk factors seriously. With regular screening, colon cancer is treatable and may be prevented. Knowing your risk factors will dictate when you start getting screened. Being aware of certain medical and lifestyle risks can help you catch colon cancer early and give you a high chance of survival. Most colon cancers occur after age 50, and African-Americans are at higher risk than other races 2 Investigate your family history. If you have one or more relatives who have had colon cancer, your chances of getting the disease increases.[3] If you have a family history of colon cancer, you should consult your doctor and see if he would recommend screening. 3 Learn if you have another medical risk factor. Inflammatory bowel diseases like Crohn's disease and ulcerative colitis can increase your risk for colon cancer. If you've been diagnosed with either of these conditions, you are at an increased risk and should consult with your doctor regularly. Certain genetic conditions like familial adenomatous polyposis (FAP) and hereditary non-polyposis colorectal cancer (Lynch syndrome) or diabetes can increase your risk of colon cancer. 4
26 Sep 2017
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how is colon cancer treated | Recognize Colon Cancer Symptoms Colorectal cancer, also called colon cancer, is the second leading cause of cancer deaths in the US. Colon cancer affects both man and women, and all racial and ethnic groups. More than 90% of cases occur in people over age 50. Unfortunately, at the onset, colon cancer has few, if any, symptoms. Read on to find out how to recognize symptoms if they do occur, as well as steps you can take to catch colon cancer while it is still in the early stages.
26 Sep 2017
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How to Screen for Colon Cancer|alternatives to colonoscopy for colon cancer screening Colon cancer is the third most common cancer. The average person has a 4.5% chance of developing it in their lifetime.[1] This is why screening tests are so important, and fortunately, for colon cancer, the screening tests are very effective. With screening, precancerous and/or cancerous lesions can be detected as early as possible, giving you the best chance of removing the lesions before they become problematic or life-threatening 1 Begin screening at the age of 50.[3] For the general population (those who have not been designated to be at a heightened risk of colon cancer), screening is recommended to commence at the age of 50. The options to consider are a stool test (recommended once every one to two years), a colonoscopy (a more invasive test that is recommended every 10 years), or a sigmoidoscopy or CT colonography (both of which are recommended every five years. The one you choose for your own personal screening will depend upon your preference. 2 Opt for a stool test.[4] Both blood and/or DNA can be tested for in your stool, and a positive test indicates suspicion that you may have colon cancer. It does not indicate that you have colon cancer - it simply means that you are at a heightened risk and should undergo more extensive medical evaluation. The advantage of stool testing is that it is an easy and non-invasive test. You can collect the stool sample(s) at home (depending upon how many are requested by your doctor) and simply send them into the lab for formal evaluation.
26 Sep 2017
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How to Self Screen for Colon Cancer|alternatives to colonoscopy for colon cancer screening Colon cancer is the third most common cancer. However, there are excellent screening tests available and, when caught early, colon cancer is able to be treated and cured in 90% of all cases.[1] This is why following through with the recommended screening is so important. See your family doctor to learn how to self-screen for colon cancer via the at-home stool test, which is recommended every one to two years for people over the age of 50. Though colon screenings performed by trained doctors are always best, an at-home test is better than nothing and could point out issues that you'll need to address. 1 Evaluate your level of risk for colon cancer.[2] Everyone is eligible for colon cancer screening beginning at the age of 50; however, if you have a family history of colon cancer, or a personal history of inflammatory bowel disease (such as Crohn's disease or ulcerative colitis, both of which increase your risk of developing colon cancer) you may be eligible to begin screening earlier. Don't wait to discuss this with your doctor — even if you are still young, it is important to notify your doctor if you have any risk factors. See your doctor at age 50 to begin self-screening, and earlier if you believe you have additional risk factors (in which case your doctor will let you know at what age you are eligible to begin). 2 Obtain the testing package.[3] The first thing you will need to do in order to self-screen for colon cancer is to obtain the at-home stool testing package. You will need to visit your family doctor to obtain this, and she will explain the procedure to you during this visit as well. One stool test is called the Fecal Occult Blood Test (FOBT). This looks for blood in your stool that is not visible to the naked eye. It is the most commonly used self-screening test for colon cancer.[4] Another stool test option is called the Fecal Immunochemical Test (FIT). This i
26 Sep 2017
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How to Stage advanced colon cancer treatment |stage 111 colon cancer Colon and rectal cancers involve the lower part of the digestive system (the large intestine/colon and the rectum). It is a common disease (the third most common form of cancer),with 132,700 new diagnoses and 49,000 deaths in the United States each year. [1] Once diagnosed, each patient's cancer is assigned a stage (I through IV) which indicates the extent and severity of the disease. The key to obtaining effective treatment for any cancer is proper staging. 1 Become aware of how colon cancer is diagnosed. For some people, they show no symptoms at all and the diagnosis is discovered from a screening test (such as the stool test); this is followed up by a colonoscopy (where the doctor inserts a tube through your rectum to look at your colon, at which point he or she will be able to see any cancer that may be present). For other people, colon cancer is diagnosed after presenting
26 Sep 2017
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how to treat colon cancer with surgery |chemotherapy for colon cancer Depending upon the stage of colon cancer you have (stage I, II, III, or IV), you may be best treated with surgery, with chemotherapy, or with a combination of both. It is key to receive treatment for your colon cancer as soon as possible, and to follow up with regular visits with your physician following treatment to monitor your recovery and to check for any possible relapses. 1 Have your colon cancer staged.[1] Before deciding on any course of treatment, the first step is to confirm your diagnosis of colon cancer and to have the cancer, if it is indeed present, staged. Staging is done using additional scanning of the body with CT or PET scanning and a biopsy of the primary cancer lesion that was found. This is important for developing an individualized treatment plan. There are 4 stages of colon cancer: Stage I is limited to the bowel while stage IV has metastasized throughout the body, with stages II and III representing intermediate levels of severity without body-wide metastases. Stages I, II, and III are generally treated with surgery as the first-line option. Stages II and III may require "adjuvant" chemotherapy (chemotherapy to supplement the treatment following surgical excision of the cancer). Stage IV is treated predominantly with chemotherapy, and occasional surgery is used as an adjunct (as an addition) to remove masses causing pain, obstruction (blockage of the bowel), or that are otherwise problematical.
26 Sep 2017
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How to Alter Your Diet to Avoid Colon Polyps|what does precancerous colon polyps mean Colon polyps are little nodules that are found along the lining of the large intestine. These little mushroom-shaped growths can be very small but also grow to the size of a golf ball as well. Some types of polyps, especially the smaller ones, are benign. However, other types and the ones that have gotten much larger may turn into colon cancer.[1] Although colon polyps can be removed (as during a colonoscopy), it's also important to make sure that you alter your diet to help prevent polyps from forming in the first place. 1 Focus on red, yellow and orange vegetables. Vegetables are an important food group to prevent a variety of diseases and cancers. However, red, yellow and orange vegetables have high levels of vitamins and antioxidants that can help keep your colon healthy.[2] What makes these vegetables that particular color are the vitamins and antioxidants that are found in them. Red, yellow and orange vegetables
26 Sep 2017
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How to Reduce the Risk of Colon Cancer|colorectal cancer information Colon (or colorectal) cancer is among the top five most frequent types of cancer in both women and men worldwide. About half the people who have colon cancer die from it. However, over 50 percent of colon cancer cases can be avoided by following basic prevention methods. There are many ways to reduce your risk of contracting colon cancer, including regular screening and consultations, quitting smoking, eating well-balanced diet, and getting regular physical activity. 1 Get a colonoscopy. Colonoscopy screenings typically begin when you turn 50 if you have no other colon cancer risk factors, such as relatives who have had colon cancer. If you have a family history of colorectal cancer or inflammatory bowel disease, your physician may advise you to have a colonoscopy before your 50th birthday.[2] Prepare for your colonoscopy screening. The colonoscopy allows doctors to remove any polyps that may be forming in your colon. Polyps take 10 to 15 years to grow and may turn into colorectal cancer. You may be required to fast and go through a colon cleansing. Getting a colonoscopy performed will take less than one day. 2 Get a Fecal Occult Blood Test (FOBT). FOBTs are tests that look for hidden blood in the stool which can be signs of polyp growth or cancer. FOBTs are much less invasive than colonoscopy and can be done once a year.[3] You may often have the option of sampling your stool at home and mailing it, in a container provided to you by your doctor, to a lab to be medically tested.
26 Sep 2017
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How to Understand How Colon Cancer Occurs|non small cell lung cancer This article gives an overview about the medical condition of colon cancer and its causes 1 Learn what is colon cancer. Colon cancer, or as it is often called colorectal cancer is a potentially fatal type of cancer due to its metastatic potential. It is a common disease and is a leading cause of death among the elderly people. Before I discuss this disorder it is useful to give an overview about the structure and function of the colon itself. All these in addition to the causes of colon cancer will be discussed here in the context of this article. 2 Study the anatomy of the colon. The colon or as it is often called the large intestine is the last part of the intestine and is connected with the small intestine by a valve which is called the ileocecal valve. The colon is connected at its first part with the ileum which is the last part of the small intestine. The ileocecal valve makes sure that food in the colon does not backflow to the small intestine and is propelled in one direction.
26 Sep 2017
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How to Alter Your Diet to Avoid Colon Polyps|types of colon polyps and cancer Colon polyps are little nodules that are found along the lining of the large intestine. These little mushroom-shaped growths can be very small but also grow to the size of a golf ball as well. Some types of polyps, especially the smaller ones, are benign. However, other types and the ones that have gotten much larger may turn into colon cancer.[1] Although colon polyps can be removed (as during a colonoscopy), it's also important to make sure that you alter your diet to help prevent polyps from forming in the first place. 1 Focus on red, yellow and orange vegetables. Vegetables are an important food group to prevent a variety of diseases and cancers. However, red, yellow and orange vegetables have high levels of vitamins and antioxidants that can help keep your colon healthy.[2] What makes these vegetables that particular color are the vitamins and antioxidants that are found in them. Red, yellow and orange vegetables are particularly high in an antioxidant known as beta carotene which is an orange/red color. This antioxidant is often associated with Vitamin A as it is a precursor to becoming Vitamin A in your body. Adequate intakes are also associated with a decreased rate of colon cancer.
27 Sep 2017
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How to Screen for Lung Cancer|cancer screening center Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer deaths among both genders in the U.S., claiming more lives than colon, prostate, ovarian and breast cancer combined.[1] People at the greatest risk for lung cancer include smokers and those who work with or around toxic chemicals, gases and irritating particles. Screening for lung cancer is important because it's much easier to treat in the early stages before spreading or metastasizing to other parts of the body. You can sort of screen / monitor yourself by understanding common symptoms, but periodically seeing your doctor for chest x-rays, sputum samples and/or CT scans is the best strategy. 1 Remember that early symptoms can be mild and vague. One of the reasons that lung cancer is so deadly is that the disease doesn't often cause noticeable symptoms during the early stages.[2] Furthermore, the mild symptoms of early stage lung cancer are often mistaken for a cold, bout of the flu, bronchitis or asthma. Common early signs of lung cancer (and most upper respiratory infections) include a mild, persistent cough, shortness of breath, fatigue, and weight loss. Signs and symptoms of lung cancer usually become noticeable once the disease is advanced, which is why it's such as deadly disease. The common cold, flu and bronchitis are viral infections that typically fade away two to three weeks, so if your symptoms persist, schedule an appointment with your doctor. 2 Be suspicious of a new cough that doesn't go away. One of the telltale symptoms of lung cancer is the development of a persistent cough that's either completely new or noticeably different than the typical dry, hacking smoker's cough.[3] In contrast to the dry and unproductive cough common with smokers, coughing up foul-smelling phlegm and even blood on occasion is not unusual with the mid-stages of lung cancer. Due to the constant coughing and slow destruction of tissue in the lungs from lung cancer, chest pain
27 Sep 2017
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