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This is the very first issue of this rare & private Live video of The Lord’s Prayer, originally composed by Albert Hay Malotte and rendered quite famous through Mario Lanza, who offered a wonderful & magic unforgettable interpretation of this aria in his movie “Because you’re mine”. This new current version you’re listening shows an original musical arrangement for symphonic orchestra, piano, male chorus & solo voice. It was specially composed for and sung during the celebration of a marriage in Switzerland on July 31, 1999. The Lord's Prayer, also known as the Our Father or Pater noster, is probably the best-known prayer in Christianity. On Easter Sunday 2007 it was estimated that 2 billion Protestant, Catholic, and Eastern Orthodox Christians read, recited, or sang the short prayer in hundreds of languages in houses of worship of all shapes and sizes. Although many theological differences and various modes and manners of worship divide Christians, according to Fuller Seminary professor Clayton Schmit "there is a sense of solidarity in knowing that Christians around the globe are praying together, and these words always unite us. Two versions of it occur in the New Testament, one in the Gospel of Matthew 6:9–13 as part of the discourse on ostentation, a section of the Sermon on the Mount, and the other in the Gospel of Luke 11:2–4. The prayer's absence from the Gospel of Mark (cf. the Prayer for forgiveness of 11:25–26), taken together with its presence in both Luke and Matthew, has caused many scholars who accept the Q hypothesis (as opposed to Proto-Matthean theory) to conclude that it is a quotation from the Q document, especially because of the context in Luke's presentation of the prayer, where many phrases show similarity to the Q-like Gospel of Thomas. The context of the prayer in Matthew is as part of a discourse attacking people who pray simply for the purpose of being seen to pray. Matthew describes Jesus as instructing people to pray after the manner of this prayer. Taking into account the prayer's structure, flow of subject matter and emphases, many interpret the Lord's Prayer as a guideline on how to pray rather than something to be learned and repeated by rote. Some disagree, suggesting that the prayer was intended as a specific prayer to be used. The New Testament reports Jesus and the disciples praying on several occasions; but as it never describes them actually using this prayer, it is uncertain how important it was originally viewed as being. There are several different translations of the Lord's Prayer. One of the first texts in English is the Northumbrian translation from around 650. The three best-known in English speaking groups are The English translation in the 1662 Anglican Book of Common Prayer (BCP) The translation of the English Language Liturgical Consultation (ELLC), an ecumenical body The Latin version used in the Roman Catholic Church In three of the texts given below, the square brackets indicate the doxology with which the prayer is often concluded. This is not included in critical editions of the New Testament, such as that of the United Bible Societies, as not belonging to the original text of Matthew 6:9–13, nor is it always part of the Book of Common Prayer text. The Roman Catholic form of the Lord's Prayer never ends with it. Our Father, which art in Heaven, Hallowed be thy Name. Thy Kingdom come. Thy will be done, in earth as it is in Heaven. Give us this day our daily bread. And forgive us our trespasses, As we forgive them that trespass against us. And lead us not into temptation; But deliver us from evil. For thine is the Kingdom, and The power, and the Glory, For ever. Amen. Variants of the 1662 BCP version (first column) are also in use. In the 1928 edition of the Church of England Prayer Book, "which" was changed to "who," "in earth" to "on earth," and "them that" to "those who" and this version is widely known. The Eastern Orthodox Churches also use a modified version of this form of the Our Father in their English services. Some non-Christian groups, such as religious science sometimes use the prayer also, often with modified wording, such as replacing the word "evil" with "error." Though Matthew 6:12 uses the term debts, the 1662 version of the Lord's Prayer uses the term trespasses, while ecumenical versions often use the term sins. The latter choice may be due to Luke 11:4, which uses the word sins, while the former may be due to Matthew 6:12 (immediately after the text of the prayer), where Jesus speaks of trespasses. As early as the third century, Origen used the word trespasses (παραπτώματα) in the prayer. Though the Latin form that was traditionally used in Western Europe has debita (debts), most English-speaking Christians (except Presbyterians and others of the Reformed tradition), use trespasses. The Established Presbyterian Church of Scotland follows the version found in Matthew 6 in the Authorized Version (known also as the King James Version), which in the prayer uses the words "debts" and "debtors." Roman Catholics usually do not add the doxology "For Thine is the kingdom, power, and glory, forever and ever." However, this doxology, in the form "For the kingdom, the power, and the glory are yours, now and for ever," is used in the Catholic Mass, separated from the Lord's Prayer by a prayer, spoken or sung by the priest, that elaborates on the final petition, "Deliver us from evil." In the 1975 ICEL translation, this prayer reads: "Deliver us, Lord, from every evil, and grant us peace in our day. In your mercy keep us free from sin and protect us from all anxiety as we wait in joyful hope for the coming of our Savior, Jesus Christ." All these versions are based on the text in Matthew, rather than Luke, of the prayer given by Jesus: Matthew 6:9–13 (KJV) After this manner therefore pray ye: Our Father which art in Heaven, Hallowed be thy name. Thy kingdom come. Thy will be done in earth, as it is in Heaven. Give us this day our daily bread. And forgive us our debts, as we forgive our debtors. And lead us not into temptation, but deliver us from evil: For thine is the kingdom, and the power, and the glory, for ever. Amen. Luke 11:2–4 (KJV) And he said unto them, When ye pray, say, Our Father which art in Heaven, Hallowed be thy name. Thy kingdom come. Thy will be done, as in Heaven, so in earth. Give us day by day our daily bread. And forgive us our sins; for we also forgive every one that is indebted to us. And lead us not into temptation; but deliver us from evil. "Our Father, which art in Heaven" The opening pronoun of Matthew's version of the prayer—our—is plural, which is viewed by many as a strong indication that the prayer was intended for communal, rather than private, worship. Together, the first two words—Our Father—are a title used elsewhere in the New Testament, as well as in Jewish literature, to refer to God. This is most likely the intent of the prayer. "Hallowed be thy Name" Having opened, the prayer begins in the same manner as the Kaddish, hallowing the name of God, and then going on to express hope that God's will and kingdom will happen. In Judaism the name of God is of extreme importance, and honouring the name central to piety. In that era names were not simply labels, but were seen as true reflections of objects' nature. Therefore, when the prayer seeks to hallow God's name, it was seen as equivalent to actually hallowing God. Hallowed is the passive voice and future tense, which to some makes it unclear how this hallowing is meant to occur. One interpretation is that this is a call for all believers to honour God's name. Those who see the prayer as primarily eschatological understand the prayer to be an expression of desire for end times when God's name, in the eyes of those carrying out the prayer, would be universally honoured. "Thy kingdom come" The request for God's kingdom to come is usually interpreted as a reference to the belief, common at the time, that a Messiah figure would bring about a Kingdom of God. Some scholars have argued that this prayer is pre-Christian and was not designed for specifically Christian interpretation. Many evangelicals see it as quite the opposite—a command to spread Christianity. "Thy will be done, in earth as it is in Heaven" The prayer follows with an expression of hope for God's will to be done. This expressing of hope can be interpreted in different ways. Some see it as an addendum to assert a request for Earth to be under direct and manifest divine command. Others see it as a call on people to submit to God and his teachings. In the Gospels, these requests have the added clarification in earth, as it is in Heaven, an ambiguous phrase in Greek which can either be a simile (i.e., make earth like Heaven), or a couple (i.e., both in Heaven and earth), though simile is the most common interpretation. "Give us this day our daily bread" The more personal requests break from the similarity to the Kaddish. The first concerns daily bread. What this means is slightly obscure, since the word that is normally translated as daily—ἐπιούσιος epiousios—is almost a hapax legomenon, occurring only in Luke and Matthew's versions of the Lord's Prayer, and in an Egyptian accounting book, with no other surviving written citations. Daily bread appears to be a reference to the way God provided manna to the Israelites each day while they were in the wilderness, as in Exodus 16:15–21. Since they could not keep any manna overnight, they had to depend on God to provide anew each morning. Etymologically epiousios seems to be related to the Greek word ousia, meaning substance. Early heterodox writers connected this to Eucharistic transubstantiation. Modern scholars tend to reject this connection on the presumption that Eucharistic practise and the doctrine of transubstantiation both developed later than Matthew was written. Protestants concur since they reject belief in transubstantiation. Epiousios can also be understood as existence, i.e., bread that was fundamental to survival. In the era, bread was the most important food for survival. However, scholars of linguistics consider this rendering unlikely since it would violate standard rules of word formation. Koine Greek had several far more common terms for the same idea. The usage of epiousios in the Egyptian papyrus is in the sense of for tomorrow. That is more clearly stated in the wording used by the Gospel of the Nazoraeans for the prayer. Therefore, the common translation is daily, a translation conveniently close in meaning to the other two possibilities as well. Those Christians who read the Lord's Prayer as eschatological view epiousios as referring to the second coming—reading for tomorrow (and bread) in a metaphorical sense. Most scholars disagree, particularly since Jesus is portrayed throughout Luke and Matthew as caring for everyday needs for his followers, particularly in the bread-related miracles that are recounted. "And forgive us our trespasses, as we forgive them that trespass against us" After the request for bread, Matthew and Luke diverge slightly. Matthew continues with a request for debts to be forgiven in the same manner as people forgive those who have debts against them. Luke, on the other hand, makes a similar request about sins being forgiven in the manner of debts being forgiven between people. According to literal translation of the Greek, the debts are financial debts. However, in Aramaic, the word for debt can also mean sin. The difference between Luke and Matthew's wording could be explained by the prayer about which they were writing was originally written in Aramaic. It is generally accepted that the request is talking about forgiveness of sin, rather than merely loans. This is the traditional interpretation, although some groups read it literally as a condemnation of all forms of lending. Asking for forgiveness from God was a staple of Jewish prayers. It was also considered proper for individuals to be forgiving of others, thus requiring the sentiment expressed in the prayer would have been a common one of the time. "And lead us not into temptation" Interpretations of the penultimate petition of the prayer—not to be led by God into peirasmos—vary considerably. Peirasmos can mean temptation, or just test of character. Traditionally it has been translated temptation. Since this would seem to imply that God leads people to sin, individuals uncomfortable with that implication read it as test of character. There are generally two arguments for this reading. First, it may be an eschatological appeal against unfavourable last judgement, though nowhere in literature of the time, not even in the New Testament, is the term peirasmos connected to such an event. The other argument is that it acts as a plea against hard tests described elsewhere in scripture, such as those of Job. Yet, this would depart heavily from Jewish practice of the time when pleas were typically made, during prayer, to be put through such tests. "But deliver us from evil" Translations and scholars are divided over whether the evil mentioned in the final petition refers to evil in general or the devil in particular. The original Greek is quite vague. In earlier parts of the Sermon on the Mount, in which Matthew's version of the prayer appears, the term is used to refer to general evil. Later parts of Matthew refer to the devil when discussing similar issues. However, the devil is never referred to as the evil in any Aramaic sources. While John Calvin accepted the vagueness of the term's meaning, he considered there to be little real difference between the two interpretations, and therefore of no real consequence. "For thine is the kingdom, and the power, and the glory, for ever. Amen" The doxology of the prayer is not contained in Luke's version, nor is it present in the earliest manuscripts of Matthew. The first known use of the doxology (in a less lengthy form) as a conclusion for the Lord's Prayer is in the Didache. In it are at least ten different versions among the early manuscripts before it seems to have standardized. Jewish prayers at the time had doxological endings. The doxology may have been originally appended for use during congregational worship. If so, it could be based on 1 Chronicles 29:11. Most scholars and many modern translations do not include the doxology except in footnotes. Nevertheless, it remains in use liturgically in Eastern Christianity and among Protestants. A minority, generally fundamentalists, posit that the doxology was so important that early editions neglected it due to its obviousness, though several other quite obvious things are mentioned in the Gospels. A map of European languages (1741) had the first verse of the Lord's Prayer put in every language. Since the publication of the Mithridates books, translations of the prayer have often been used for a quick comparison of languages, primarily because most earlier philologists were Christians, and very often priests. Due to missionary activity, one of the first texts to be translated between many languages has historically been the Bible, and so to early scholars the most readily available text in any particular language would most likely be a partial or total translation of the Bible. For example, the only extant text in Gothic, a language crucial in the history of Indo-European languages, is Codex Argenteus, the incomplete Bible translated by Wulfila. This tradition has been opposed recently from both the angle of religious neutrality and of practicality: the forms used in the Lord's Prayer (many commands) are not very representative of common discourse. Philologists and language enthusiasts have proposed other texts such as the Babel text (also part of the Bible) or the story of the North Wind and the Sun. In Soviet language sciences the complete works of Lenin were often used for comparison, as they were translated to most languages in the 20th century. Latin version The Latin version of this prayer has had cultural and historical importance for most regions where English is spoken. The text used in the liturgy (Mass, Liturgy of the Hours, etc.) differs slightly from that found in the Vulgate and probably pre-dates it. The doxology associated with the Lord's Prayer is found in four Vetus Latina manuscripts, only two of which give it in its entirety. The other surviving manuscripts of the Vetus Latina Gospels do not have the doxology. The Vulgate translation also does not include it, thus agreeing with critical editions of the Greek text. In the Latin Rite liturgies, this doxology is never attached to the Lord's Prayer. Its only use in the Roman Rite liturgy is in the Mass as revised after the Second Vatican Council. It is there placed not immediately after the Lord's Prayer, but instead after the priest's prayer, Libera nos, quaesumus..., elaborating on the final petition, Libera nos a malo (Deliver us from evil). Relation to Jewish prayer There are similarities between the Lord's Prayer and both Biblical and post-Biblical material in Jewish prayer. "Hallowed be thy name" is reflected in the Kaddish. "Lead us not into sin" is echoed in the "morning blessings" of Jewish prayer. A blessing said by some Jewish communities after the evening Shema includes a phrase quite similar to the opening of the Lord's Prayer: "Our God in heaven, hallow thy name, and establish thy kingdom forever, and rule over us for ever and ever". Malotte graduated from Tioga High School and sang at Saint James Episcopal Church in Philadelphia as a choir boy. He studied with Victor Herbert, W. S. Stansfield, and later in Paris with Gordon Jacob. His career as an organist began in Chicago where he played for silent pictures and later concertized throughout the US and Europe. During World War II he held the rank of Captain in the Special Services for two years while he toured with the USO and entertained troops in New Guinea, Australia and Europe. At one point he sponsored his own troup of entertainers that included Judith Anderson, Ann Triola and Helen McClure Preister. Malotte was an amateur pilot, avid golfer and even boxed with Jack Dempsey in Memphis, Tennessee. He spent most of his career as a composer in Hollywood. Malotte composed a number of film scores, including mostly uncredited music for animations from the Disney studios. Although two movies for which he composed scores won best Short Subject Academy Awards (Ferdinand the Bull in 1939 and The Ugly Duckling in 1940), he is best remembered for a setting of the Lord's Prayer. Written in 1935, it was recorded by the baritone John Charles Thomas, and remained highly popular for use as a solo in churches and at weddings in the US for some decades. He composed a number of other religious pieces, including settings of the Beatitudes and of the Twenty-third Psalm which have also remained popular as solos. His secular songs, such as "Ferdinand the bull" (from the Disney animated short of the same name), "For my mother" (a setting of a poem by 12-year-old Bobby Sutherland) and "I am proud to be an American" are less well remembered. Some of his works are collected in the library of the University of California Los Angeles and the Library of Congress. In addition, Malotte wrote uncredited stock music for many other films in the 1930s and early 1940s, including twenty-two of the Disney Silly Symphonies and other shorts such Little Hiawatha as well as Ferdinand the Bull. He also composed cantatas, oratorios, musicals and ballets. Malotte owned Apple Valley Music. Tags: Almighty God pray praying religion religious Christian Christians Christianity love hereafter paradise theology theological Jesus spiritual spirituality faith catholic Catholicism Anglican belief believe believing croyance croire Jesus Christ spiritual spirituality Theology Mario Lanza song vocal Gospel praise the Lord Albert Hay Malotte The Lord's Prayer Christian God Jesus pray theology religious Mario Lanza Syr Maestro Sir Reginald Mother Teresa Vatican Pope popes Benedict XVI Benoît XVI Benedictus XVI John Paul II Jean-Paul II Jean Paul II missionary missionaries of Charity missionaire missionnaire de la charité chrétien chrétiens chrétienne chrétiennes chrétienté résurrection âme soul Seele Seele élévation de l’âme Padre nostro fede religione religioso Vaticano God Lord Jesus Christ pray religion religious Christian Christians theology theological spiritual spirituality faithCatholic Prayer God Lord Christians Power Mother Teresa Mère Teresa Theresa Calcutta music musical opera operatic chant cantique cantical lyrique recueillement adoration choeur chorus vocal voce bel canto melody melodie melodia Saint ST holy holiness blessing blessings bless blessed benediction benedictions benedetto benedetta benedizione heilig Heiligkeit transcend transcendance
21 Jun 2007
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So I was in the car on the way bak home and i put together another video talkin about the competition as a whole/round 3 in general/cheaters/my favorites on the site......check it out tho n let me know whas good.....more funny videos to come of course so be on the lookout...thanxxx for the votes people!!
2 Jul 2007
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0:07
An old man narrates a story told to him by his father. The story is a coming of age based on an experience crossing the U.S. by train during the 1880s. Mark Malmberg
23 Jul 2007
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0:26
if you being hated, just stay away..... A woman is a female human. The term woman (irregular plural: women) usually is used for an adult, with the term girl being the usual term for a female child or adolescent. However, the term woman is also sometimes used to identify a female human, regardless of age, as in phrases such as "Women's rights".Womanhood is the period in a female's life after she has transitioned from girlhood, at least physically, having passed the age of menarche. Many cultures have rites of passage to symbolize a woman's coming of age, such as confirmation in some branches of Christianity, bat mitzvah in Judaism, or even just the custom of a special celebration for a certain birthday (generally between 12 and 21).
20 Aug 2007
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2:50
(10-29-07) In a world that is slowly warming, the coming of Fall can only mean one thing: time to hit the beach.
30 Oct 2007
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1:20
In this Japanese production from French filmmaker Jean-Pierre Limosin, an odd young man prowls the streets of Tokyo, wearing glasses that blur his vision and a gun he invented that intentionally doesn't shoot straight. Nicknamed 'Four Eyes,' the mysterious vigilante confronts crooks and creeps with his own demented brand of justice and attracts the attention of a teenage hairdresser whose detective brother is investigating the case. A rich coming of age film that, like 'Garden State' and 'Catcher in the Rye,' takes us even deeper into the w ... More > In this Japanese production from French filmmaker Jean-Pierre Limosin, an odd young man prowls the streets of Tokyo, wearing glasses that blur his vision and a gun he invented that intentionally doesn't shoot straight. Nicknamed 'Four Eyes,' the mysterious vigilante confronts crooks and creeps with his own demented brand of justice and attracts the attention of a teenage hairdresser whose detective brother is investigating the case. A rich coming of age film that, like 'Garden State' and 'Catcher in the Rye,' takes us even deeper into the world of unaffected youth.
14 Nov 2007
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2:12
I will have more movies to come of my bird saying aflack and my other birds ellie is so funny she says alot if you ask her what her favorite insurance she says aflac not in this video but the next one I am working on thanks and enjoy!
4 Dec 2007
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4:30
The Book of Mormon is a volume of holy scripture comparable to the Bible. It is a record of God's dealings with the ancient inhabitants of the Americas and contains, as does the Bible, the fulness of the everlasting gospel. The crowning event recorded in the Book of Mormon is the personal ministry of the Lord Jesus Christ among the Nephites soon after his resurrection. It puts forth the doctrines of the gospel outlines the plan of salvation, and tells men what they must do to gain peace in this life and eternal salvation in the life to come. We invite all people everywhere to read the Book of Mormon, to ponder in their hearts the message it contains, and then to ask God, the Eternal Father, in the name of Christ, if the book is true. Those who pursue this course and ask in faith will gain a testimony of its truth and divinity by the power of the Holy Ghost. Those who gain this divine witness from the Holy Spirit will also come to know by the same power that Jesus Christ is the Savior of the world, that Joseph Smith is his revelator and prophet in these last days, and that The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints is the Lord's kingdom once again established on the earth, prepratory to the second coming of the Messiah. Originally created by Seth Adam Smith at *******www.youtube****/SethAdamSmith. Used with permission. For more information and to request a free copy of the Book of Mormon, visit *******www.mormon****
7 Jan 2008
1737
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4:08
"There are three possible explanations for the origin of the Book of Mormon. One is that it is a product of spontaneous generation. Another is that it came into existence in the way Joseph Smith said it did, by special messengers and gifts from God. The third is the hypothesis that Joseph Smith or some other party or parties simply made it all up. No experiments have ever been carried out for testing any of these theories. The first has not even been considered, the second has been dismissed with a contemptuous wave of the hand, and the third has been accepted without question or hesitation. And yet the third theory is quite as extravagant as the other two, demanding unlimited gullibility and the suspension of all critical judgment in any who would accept it. It is based on the simple proposition that since people have written books, somebody, namely Smith or a contemporary, wrote this one. But to make this thesis stick is to show not only that people have written big books, but that somebody has been able to produce a big book like this one. But no other such book exists. Where will you find another work remotely approaching the Book of Mormon in scope and daring? It appears suddenly out of nothing--not an accumulation of twenty-five years like the Koran, but a single staggering performance, bursting on a shocked and scandalized world like an explosion, the full-blown history of an ancient people, following them through all the trials, triumphs, and vicissitudes of a thousand years without a break, telling how a civilization originated, rose to momentary greatness, and passed away, giving due attention to every phase of civilized history in a densely compact and rapidly moving story that interweaves dozens of plots with an inexhaustible fertility of invention and an uncanny consistency that is never caught in a slip or contradiction. We respectfully solicit the name of any student or professor in the world who could come within ten thousand miles of such a performance. As a sheer tour-de-force there is nothing like it. The theory that Joseph Smith wrote the Book of Mormon simply will not stand examination." - Hugh Nibley, Since Cumorah The Book of Mormon is a volume of holy scripture comparable to the Bible. It is a record of God's dealings with the ancient inhabitants of the Americas and contains, as does the Bible, the fulness of the everlasting gospel. The crowning event recorded in the Book of Mormon is the personal ministry of the Lord Jesus Christ among the Nephites soon after his resurrection. It puts forth the doctrines of the gospel outlines the plan of salvation, and tells men what they must do to gain peace in this life and eternal salvation in the life to come. After the author, Mormon, completed his writings, he delivered the account to his son Moroni, who added a few words of his own and hid up the plates in the hill Cumorah. On September 21, 1823, the same Moroni, then a glorified, resurrected being, appreared to the Prophet Joseph Smith and instructed him relative to the ancient record and its destined translation into the English language. We invite all people everywhere to read the Book of Mormon, to ponder in their hearts the message it contains, and then to ask God, the Eternal Father, in the name of Christ, if the book is true. Those who pursue this course and ask in faith will gain a testimony of its truth and divinity by the power of the Holy Ghost. Those who gain this divine witness from the Holy Spirit will also come to know by the same power that Jesus Christ is the Savior of the world, that Joseph Smith is his revelator and prophet in these last days, and that The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints is the Lord's kingdom once again established on the earth, prepratory to the second coming of the Messiah. Originally created by Seth Adam Smith at *******www.youtube****/Sethadamsmith. Used with permission. For more information about the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints and to request a free copy of the Book of Mormon, visit *******www.mormon****.
7 Jan 2008
938
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2:47
The Kingdom on Earth, Kingdom of Heaven, Kingdom of God, which Obama mentions is the Second Coming of Christ After the Great Awakenings in the 18th and 19th century we now witness: The Obama Awakening The Obama Awakening is the Fifth Manifestation of the Second Coming of Christ The Obama Awakening rests on the Four Earlier Manifestations: 4. Global Communication 3. Democracy 2. Psychological Knowledge and Self-Responsibility 1. Personal Spiritual Relation with God replacing Dogma in Religion and Atheism The Obama Awakening is a catalyst for the Unification of Mankind: All religions, all ethnic groups, all ideologies, all nationalities, both genders Some will try to prevent The Obama Awakening by silencing it's leader Barack Obama is just an Instrument in The Obama Awakening which is just an Instrument in The Second Coming of Christ The Second Coming of Christ is not the Reincarnation of Jesus of Nazareth in one person It's the Awakening of the Christ Spirit in every human being Some people experience Christ as Compassion, Wisdom, Peaceful Strength, Love Christ lives in everyone, religious and non-religious If you have any questions: PRAY for an answer Keywords: Barack Obama, wins, victory, NH, primary, primaries, Awakening, Christian, Second Coming of Christ, Religion, Faith, Unity, black, Hillary Clinton, John Edwards, President, Democrat, Iowa, Caucus, African American, race, USA, Super Tuesday, Super Duper Tuesday, God, Trinity United Church of Christ, Barack Hussein Obama (pronounced /bəˈrɑːk huːˈseɪn oʊˈbɑːmə/[1]) (born August 4, 1961) is the junior United States Senator from Illinois and a leading candidate for the Democratic nomination in the 2008 presidential election.[2][3] He is the fifth African American Senator in U.S. history, the third popularly elected African American Senator, and the only African American currently serving in the U.S. Senate.[4] Born in Honolulu to a Kenyan father and an American mother, Obama grew up in culturally diverse surroundings. He lived most of his early life in Hawaii and spent four of his pre-teen years in Jakarta, Indonesia. A graduate of Columbia University and Harvard Law School, Obama worked as a community organizer, university lecturer, and civil rights lawyer before running for public office. He served in the Illinois Senate from 1997 to 2004, launching his campaign for U.S. Senate in 2003. Obama delivered the keynote address at the 2004 Democratic National Convention while still an Illinois state legislator. He went on to win election to the U.S. Senate in November 2004 with a landslide 70% of the vote in an election year marked by Republican gains.[5][6] As a member of the Democratic minority in the 109th Congress, Obama co-sponsored the enactment of conventional weapons control and transparency legislation, and made official trips to Eastern Europe, the Middle East, and Africa. In the 110th Congress, he has sponsored legislation on lobbying and electoral fraud, climate change, nuclear terrorism, and care for returned U.S. military personnel. Since announcing his presidential campaign in February 2007, Obama has emphasized ending the Iraq War, increasing energy independence, and providing universal health care as major priorities.[7] He married in 1992 and has two daughters. He has written two bestselling books: a memoir of his youth titled Dreams from My Father, and The Audacity of Hope, a personal commentary on U.S. politics.[8] Wikipedia In February 2007, standing before the Old State Capitol building in Springfield, Illinois, Obama announced his candidacy for the 2008 U.S. presidential election.[2] Describing his working life in Illinois, and symbolically linking his presidential campaign to Abraham Lincoln's 1858 House Divided speech, Obama said: "That is why, in the shadow of the Old State Capitol, where Lincoln once called on a house divided to stand together, where common hopes and common dreams still live, I stand before you today to announce my candidacy for President of the United States of America."[86] Speaking at a Democratic National Committee meeting one week before the February announcement, Obama called for putting an end to negative campaigning. "This can't be about who digs up more skeletons on who, who makes the fewest slip-ups on the campaign trail," he said. "We owe it to the American people to do more than that."[87] Obama's campaign raised US$58 million during the first half of 2007, topping all other candidates and exceeding previous records for the first six months of any year before an election year.[88] Small donors, those contributing in increments of less than $200, accounted for $16.4 million of Obama's record-breaking total, more than for any other Democratic candidate.[89] His campaign reported adding 108,000 new donors through third quarter fundraising, for a total of 365,000 individual contributors in the first nine months.[90] Amid concerns for his safety as the first black candidate seen as having a viable chance of being elected president, the U.S. government assigned Secret Service protection to Obama 18 months before the general election.[91]
7 Jan 2008
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2:54
Clara Bow: the original movie flapper who was voted America's favorite screen actress of 1927; her transient career ended prematurely with the coming of sound...
3 Feb 2008
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5:56
John Gilbert: the top billed but ill-fated MGM star whose illustrious silent film career crashed with the coming of talking pictures in the late 1920s...
4 Feb 2008
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1:21
Pax Stereo Series on NeoUrban Current Events & Commentary - Hosted by Mario Hemsley. Mario heralds the coming of a new MTV online. Love a little competition :)
19 Feb 2008
138
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6:51
Grist Vineyard's Warren Burton on Veraison. Veraison marks the coming of harvest. But, what is veraison and how do vineyard managers use this period to ensure only the best grapes are used? Warren Burton of Grist Vineyard in Sonoma's Dry Creek Valley shows how crops are thinned during veraison.
22 Feb 2008
142
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1:00
Watch Persepolis Movie Free at: *******watchpersepolis.blogspot**** The coming-of-age story of a precocious and outspoken young Iranian girl that begins during the Islamic Revolution. We meet nine-year-old Marjane when the fundamentalists first take power--forcing the veil on women and imprisoning thousands. The story then follows her as she cleverly outsmarts the "social guardians" and discovers punk, ABBA and Iron Maiden, while living with the terror of government persecution and the Iran/Iraq war.
18 Mar 2010
11915
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3:06
WE DO NOT WANT ANYONE TO ATTEMP THIS. WE ARE NOT RESPONSIBLE FOR ANYTHING TO COME OF THIS VIDEO. *******orange-water-layouts***.nr
23 Jun 2008
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