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1:04
Watch the sitting cross-legged hip stretch video to improve your hip flexibility and relieve tight hip and buttock muscles. How to do the Sitting Cross-Legged Hip Stretch: Sit cross legged and keep your back straight. Then gently lean forward. Make the emphasis of this stretch keeping your back straight, rather than trying to lean too far forward. Hold the stretch position for a minimum of 20 seconds. For more videos of hip stretching exercises, visit The Stretching Institute at... *******www.thestretchinghandbook****/archives/hip-stretch-video.php
11 Sep 2010
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0:24
This is the most elegant cat in the whole world. *******gamehackerz****/war-commander-hack-facebook-cheats-download
27 Jan 2013
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0:48
yeşim erçetin frikik mini etek bacak
1 Nov 2010
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1:43
bahar feyzan mini etek tv8 50 dakika
4 Nov 2010
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0:31
çağla kubat süper mini siyah çorapları arka sokaklar *******dizi.canay****
30 Nov 2010
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0:24
Samadhi statue is a statue situated at Mahamevuna Park in Anuradhapura, Sri Lanka. It is said that this is one of the best pieces of sculpture. The statue is 8 feet in height and made of granite and the Dhyana mudra is symbolished - The posture of meditation in which Buddha sits in the cross - legged position with upturned palms, placed one over the other on the lap.
3 Mar 2007
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0:10
Monkey caught relaxing like human in the Singapore Zoo!!! Monkey in Cross-leg.
22 Feb 2009
547
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6:15
Someone mentioned in a documentary about 50's fashion that back then models didn’t cross legs as they walked down the catwalk... they glided. That sums up the decade for me, the women simply glided through it. Music: Philip Glass - island Peggy Lee - I've had my moments Continuo - la mujer de terah Michael Nyman - the garden is becoming a robe room
29 Jun 2011
2031
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0:49
This is the place to worship Goddess Kwan Im. If you want to pray here, please prepare yourself with 3 pieces of red-coloured praying stick, take position for meditation with sitting crossed-leg posture, concentrate yourself and chant this mantra "Om Nama Siwaya, Amitaba", three times. Then you can tell Goddess Kwan Im about your problem or wish. After that, the pemangku will offer you holy water and sacred ash to purify yourself. By the way, do not offer any kind of meat to Goddess Kwan Im. So, be veg and go green. Read more about Bali at *******www.sapteka****
20 Jul 2011
406
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0:44
Diabetic Foot Care - Podiatrist in Passaic, NJ According to the American Diabetes Association, about 15.7 million people (5.9 percent of the United States population) have diabetes. Nervous system damage (also called neuropathy) affects about 60 to 70 percent of people with diabetes and is a major complication that may cause diabetics to lose feeling in their feet or hands. Foot problems are a big risk in diabetics. Diabetics must constantly monitor their feet or face severe consequences, including amputation. With a diabetic foot, a wound as small as a blister from wearing a shoe that's too tight can cause a lot of damage. Diabetes decreases blood flow, so injuries are slow to heal. When your wound is not healing, it's at risk for infection. As a diabetic, your infections spread quickly. If you have diabetes, you should inspect your feet every day. Look for puncture wounds, bruises, pressure areas, redness, warmth, blisters, ulcers, scratches, cuts and nail problems. Get someone to help you, or use a mirror. Here's some basic advice for taking care of your feet: Always keep your feet warm. Don't get your feet wet in snow or rain. Don't put your feet on radiators or in front of the fireplace. Don't smoke or sit cross-legged. Both decrease blood supply to your feet. Don't soak your feet. Don't use antiseptic solutions, drugstore medications, heating pads or sharp instruments on your feet. Trim your toenails straight across. Avoid cutting the corners. Use a nail file or emery board. If you find an ingrown toenail, contact our office. Use quality lotion to keep the skin of your feet soft and moist, but don't put any lotion between your toes. Wash your feet every day with mild soap and warm water. Wear loose socks to bed. Wear warm socks and shoes in winter. When drying your feet, pat each foot with a towel and be careful between your toes. Buy shoes that are comfortable without a breaking in period. Check how your shoe fits in width, length, back, bottom of heel, and sole. Avoid pointed-toe styles and high heels. Try to get shoes made with leather upper material and deep toe boxes. Wear new shoes for only two hours or less at a time. Don't wear the same pair everyday. Inspect the inside of each shoe before putting it on. Don't lace your shoes too tightly or loosely. Choose socks and stockings carefully. Wear clean, dry socks every day. Avoid socks with holes or wrinkles. Thin cotton socks are more absorbent for summer wear. Square-toes socks will not squeeze your toes. Avoid stockings with elastic tops. When your feet become numb, they are at risk for becoming deformed. One way this happens is through ulcers. Open sores may become infected. Another way is the bone condition Charcot (pronounced sharko) foot. This is one of the most serious foot problems you can face. It warps the shape of your foot when your bones fracture and disintegrate, and yet you continue to walk on it because it doesn't hurt. Diabetic foot ulcers and early phases of Charcot fractures can be treated with a total contact cast. The shape of your foot molds the cast. It lets your ulcer heal by distributing weight and relieving pressure. If you have Charcot foot, the cast controls your foot's movement and supports its contours if you don't put any weight on it. To use a total contact cast, you need good blood flow in your foot. The cast is changed every week or two until your foot heals. A custom-walking boot is another way to treat your Charcot foot. It supports the foot until all the swelling goes down, which can take as long as a year. You should keep from putting your weight on the Charcot foot. Surgery is considered if your deformity is too severe for a brace or shoe. Visit our website: *******www.northeasternfootandankle****
27 May 2010
270
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1:29
Diabetic Foot Care - Podiatrist in Jacksonville, FL According to the American Diabetes Association, about 15.7 million people (5.9 percent of the United States population) have diabetes. Nervous system damage (also called neuropathy) affects about 60 to 70 percent of people with diabetes and is a major complication that may cause diabetics to lose feeling in their feet or hands. Foot problems are a big risk in diabetics. Diabetics must constantly monitor their feet or face severe consequences, including amputation. With a diabetic foot, a wound as small as a blister from wearing a shoe that's too tight can cause a lot of damage. Diabetes decreases blood flow, so injuries are slow to heal. When your wound is not healing, it's at risk for infection. As a diabetic, your infections spread quickly. If you have diabetes, you should inspect your feet every day. Look for puncture wounds, bruises, pressure areas, redness, warmth, blisters, ulcers, scratches, cuts and nail problems. Get someone to help you, or use a mirror. Here's some basic advice for taking care of your feet: Always keep your feet warm. Don't get your feet wet in snow or rain. Don't put your feet on radiators or in front of the fireplace. Don't smoke or sit cross-legged. Both decrease blood supply to your feet. Don't soak your feet. Don't use antiseptic solutions, drugstore medications, heating pads or sharp instruments on your feet. Trim your toenails straight across. Avoid cutting the corners. Use a nail file or emery board. If you find an ingrown toenail, contact our office. Use quality lotion to keep the skin of your feet soft and moist, but don't put any lotion between your toes. Wash your feet every day with mild soap and warm water. Wear loose socks to bed. Wear warm socks and shoes in winter. When drying your feet, pat each foot with a towel and be careful between your toes. Buy shoes that are comfortable without a breaking in period. Check how your shoe fits in width, length, back, bottom of heel, and sole. Avoid pointed-toe styles and high heels. Try to get shoes made with leather upper material and deep toe boxes. Wear new shoes for only two hours or less at a time. Don't wear the same pair everyday. Inspect the inside of each shoe before putting it on. Don't lace your shoes too tightly or loosely. Choose socks and stockings carefully. Wear clean, dry socks every day. Avoid socks with holes or wrinkles. Thin cotton socks are more absorbent for summer wear. Square-toes socks will not squeeze your toes. Avoid stockings with elastic tops. When your feet become numb, they are at risk for becoming deformed. One way this happens is through ulcers. Open sores may become infected. Another way is the bone condition Charcot (pronounced sharko) foot. This is one of the most serious foot problems you can face. It warps the shape of your foot when your bones fracture and disintegrate, and yet you continue to walk on it because it doesn't hurt. Diabetic foot ulcers and early phases of Charcot fractures can be treated with a total contact cast. The shape of your foot molds the cast. It lets your ulcer heal by distributing weight and relieving pressure. If you have Charcot foot, the cast controls your foot's movement and supports its contours if you don't put any weight on it. To use a total contact cast, you need good blood flow in your foot. The cast is changed every week or two until your foot heals. A custom-walking boot is another way to treat your Charcot foot. It supports the foot until all the swelling goes down, which can take as long as a year. You should keep from putting your weight on the Charcot foot. Surgery is considered if your deformity is too severe for a brace or shoe. Visit our website: *******www.firstcoastfootclinic****
20 Mar 2010
446
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1:12
Diabetic Foot Care - Podiatrist in San Leandro, CA The Foot Doctor of the East Bay According to the American Diabetes Association, about 15.7 million people (5.9 percent of the United States population) have diabetes. Nervous system damage (also called neuropathy) affects about 60 to 70 percent of people with diabetes and is a major complication that may cause diabetics to lose feeling in their feet or hands. Foot problems are a big risk in diabetics. Diabetics must constantly monitor their feet or face severe consequences, including amputation. With a diabetic foot, a wound as small as a blister from wearing a shoe that's too tight can cause a lot of damage. Diabetes decreases blood flow, so injuries are slow to heal. When your wound is not healing, it's at risk for infection. As a diabetic, your infections spread quickly. If you have diabetes, you should inspect your feet every day. Look for puncture wounds, bruises, pressure areas, redness, warmth, blisters, ulcers, scratches, cuts and nail problems. Get someone to help you, or use a mirror. Here's some basic advice for taking care of your feet: Always keep your feet warm. Don't get your feet wet in snow or rain. Don't put your feet on radiators or in front of the fireplace. Don't smoke or sit cross-legged. Both decrease blood supply to your feet. Don't soak your feet. Don't use antiseptic solutions, drugstore medications, heating pads or sharp instruments on your feet. Trim your toenails straight across. Avoid cutting the corners. Use a nail file or emery board. If you find an ingrown toenail, contact our office. Use quality lotion to keep the skin of your feet soft and moist, but don't put any lotion between your toes. Wash your feet every day with mild soap and warm water. Wear loose socks to bed. Wear warm socks and shoes in winter. When drying your feet, pat each foot with a towel and be careful between your toes. Buy shoes that are comfortable without a breaking in period. Check how your shoe fits in width, length, back, bottom of heel, and sole. Avoid pointed-toe styles and high heels. Try to get shoes made with leather upper material and deep toe boxes. Wear new shoes for only two hours or less at a time. Don't wear the same pair everyday. Inspect the inside of each shoe before putting it on. Don't lace your shoes too tightly or loosely. Choose socks and stockings carefully. Wear clean, dry socks every day. Avoid socks with holes or wrinkles. Thin cotton socks are more absorbent for summer wear. Square-toes socks will not squeeze your toes. Avoid stockings with elastic tops. When your feet become numb, they are at risk for becoming deformed. One way this happens is through ulcers. Open sores may become infected. Another way is the bone condition Charcot (pronounced sharko) foot. This is one of the most serious foot problems you can face. It warps the shape of your foot when your bones fracture and disintegrate, and yet you continue to walk on it because it doesn't hurt. Diabetic foot ulcers and early phases of Charcot fractures can be treated with a total contact cast. The shape of your foot molds the cast. It lets your ulcer heal by distributing weight and relieving pressure. If you have Charcot foot, the cast controls your foot's movement and supports its contours if you don't put any weight on it. To use a total contact cast, you need good blood flow in your foot. The cast is changed every week or two until your foot heals. A custom-walking boot is another way to treat your Charcot foot. It supports the foot until all the swelling goes down, which can take as long as a year. You should keep from putting your weight on the Charcot foot. Surgery is considered if your deformity is too severe for a brace or shoe. Visit our website at: *******www.footdoctoreastbay****
16 Mar 2010
357
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1:28
Jacksonville Podiatrist - Diabetic Foot Care According to the American Diabetes Association, about 15.7 million people (5.9 percent of the United States population) have diabetes. Nervous system damage (also called neuropathy) affects about 60 to 70 percent of people with diabetes and is a major complication that may cause diabetics to lose feeling in their feet or hands. Foot problems are a big risk in diabetics. Diabetics must constantly monitor their feet or face severe consequences, including amputation. With a diabetic foot, a wound as small as a blister from wearing a shoe that's too tight can cause a lot of damage. Diabetes decreases blood flow, so injuries are slow to heal. When your wound is not healing, it's at risk for infection. As a diabetic, your infections spread quickly. If you have diabetes, you should inspect your feet every day. Look for puncture wounds, bruises, pressure areas, redness, warmth, blisters, ulcers, scratches, cuts and nail problems. Get someone to help you, or use a mirror. Here's some basic advice for taking care of your feet: Always keep your feet warm. Don't get your feet wet in snow or rain. Don't put your feet on radiators or in front of the fireplace. Don't smoke or sit cross-legged. Both decrease blood supply to your feet. Don't soak your feet. Don't use antiseptic solutions, drugstore medications, heating pads or sharp instruments on your feet. Trim your toenails straight across. Avoid cutting the corners. Use a nail file or emery board. If you find an ingrown toenail, contact our office. Use quality lotion to keep the skin of your feet soft and moist, but don't put any lotion between your toes. Wash your feet every day with mild soap and warm water. Wear loose socks to bed. Wear warm socks and shoes in winter. When drying your feet, pat each foot with a towel and be careful between your toes. Buy shoes that are comfortable without a "breaking in" period. Check how your shoe fits in width, length, back, bottom of heel, and sole. Avoid pointed-toe styles and high heels. Try to get shoes made with leather upper material and deep toe boxes. Wear new shoes for only two hours or less at a time. Don't wear the same pair everyday. Inspect the inside of each shoe before putting it on. Don't lace your shoes too tightly or loosely. Choose socks and stockings carefully. Wear clean, dry socks every day. Avoid socks with holes or wrinkles. Thin cotton socks are more absorbent for summer wear. Square-toes socks will not squeeze your toes. Avoid stockings with elastic tops. When your feet become numb, they are at risk for becoming deformed. One way this happens is through ulcers. Open sores may become infected. Another way is the bone condition Charcot (pronounced "sharko") foot. This is one of the most serious foot problems you can face. It warps the shape of your foot when your bones fracture and disintegrate, and yet you continue to walk on it because it doesn't hurt. Diabetic foot ulcers and early phases of Charcot fractures can be treated with a total contact cast. The shape of your foot molds the cast. It lets your ulcer heal by distributing weight and relieving pressure. If you have Charcot foot, the cast controls your foot's movement and supports its contours if you don't put any weight on it. To use a total contact cast, you need good blood flow in your foot. The cast is changed every week or two until your foot heals. A custom-walking boot is another way to treat your Charcot foot. It supports the foot until all the swelling goes down, which can take as long as a year. You should keep from putting your weight on the Charcot foot. Surgery is considered if your deformity is too severe for a brace or shoe. Visit our website: *******www.firstcoastfootclinic****
3 Jun 2010
208
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1:24
Here's some basic advice for taking care of your feet: Always keep your feet warm. Don't get your feet wet in snow or rain. Don't put your feet on radiators or in front of the fireplace. Don't smoke or sit cross-legged. Both decrease blood supply to your feet. Don't soak your feet. Don't use antiseptic solutions, drugstore medications, heating pads or sharp instruments on your feet. Trim your toenails straight across. Avoid cutting the corners. Use a nail file or emery board. If you find an ingrown toenail, contact our office. Use quality lotion to keep the skin of your feet soft and moist, but don't put any lotion between your toes. Wash your feet every day with mild soap and warm water. Wear loose socks to bed. Wear warm socks and shoes in winter.
26 Jun 2010
195
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2:07
Diabetic Foot Care - Podiatrist in Roseville, CA According to the American Diabetes Association, about 15.7 million people (5.9 percent of the United States population) have diabetes. Nervous system damage (also called neuropathy) affects about 60 to 70 percent of people with diabetes and is a major complication that may cause diabetics to lose feeling in their feet or hands. Foot problems are a big risk in diabetics. Diabetics must constantly monitor their feet or face severe consequences, including amputation. With a diabetic foot, a wound as small as a blister from wearing a shoe that's too tight can cause a lot of damage. Diabetes decreases blood flow, so injuries are slow to heal. When your wound is not healing, it's at risk for infection. As a diabetic, your infections spread quickly. If you have diabetes, you should inspect your feet every day. Look for puncture wounds, bruises, pressure areas, redness, warmth, blisters, ulcers, scratches, cuts and nail problems. Get someone to help you, or use a mirror. Here's some basic advice for taking care of your feet: * Always keep your feet warm. * Don't get your feet wet in snow or rain. * Don't put your feet on radiators or in front of the fireplace. * Don't smoke or sit cross-legged. Both decrease blood supply to your feet. * Don't soak your feet. * Don't use antiseptic solutions, drugstore medications, heating pads or sharp instruments on your feet. * Trim your toenails straight across. Avoid cutting the corners. Use a nail file or emery board. If you find an ingrown toenail, contact our office. * Use quality lotion to keep the skin of your feet soft and moist, but don't put any lotion between your toes. * Wash your feet every day with mild soap and warm water. * Wear loose socks to bed. * Wear warm socks and shoes in winter. * When drying your feet, pat each foot with a towel and be careful between your toes. * Buy shoes that are comfortable without a breaking in period. Check how your shoe fits in width, length, back, bottom of heel, and sole. Avoid pointed-toe styles and high heels. Try to get shoes made with leather upper material and deep toe boxes. Wear new shoes for only two hours or less at a time. Don't wear the same pair everyday. Inspect the inside of each shoe before putting it on. Don't lace your shoes too tightly or loosely. * Choose socks and stockings carefully. Wear clean, dry socks every day. Avoid socks with holes or wrinkles. Thin cotton socks are more absorbent for summer wear. Square-toes socks will not squeeze your toes. Avoid stockings with elastic tops. When your feet become numb, they are at risk for becoming deformed. One way this happens is through ulcers. Open sores may become infected. Another way is the bone condition Charcot (pronounced sharko) foot. This is one of the most serious foot problems you can face. It warps the shape of your foot when your bones fracture and disintegrate, and yet you continue to walk on it because it doesn't hurt. Diabetic foot ulcers and early phases of Charcot fractures can be treated with a total contact cast. The shape of your foot molds the cast. It lets your ulcer heal by distributing weight and relieving pressure. If you have Charcot foot, the cast controls your foot's movement and supports its contours if you don't put any weight on it. To use a total contact cast, you need good blood flow in your foot. The cast is changed every week or two until your foot heals. A custom-walking boot is another way to treat your Charcot foot. It supports the foot until all the swelling goes down, which can take as long as a year. You should keep from putting your weight on the Charcot foot. Surgery is considered if your deformity is too severe for a brace or shoe. Visit our website: *******www.shoemakerpodiatry****
21 Sep 2010
243
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26:20
Method of Meditation and Online Initiation by Mantra Video - Guru Siyag Siddha Yoga System of Meditation and Yoga -Free of Charge using this Video clip. Sit in a comfortable position. You can sit cross-legged on the floor, lie down, sit on a chair / couch etc., to meditate. Look at Guru Siyag's picture for a minute or two until you remember the image. Then close your eyes and say silently to Guru Siyag, "Help me meditate for 15 minutes." You can choose a time-limit according to your convenience, for eg., 5 / 10 /12 /… minutes. Then, with your eyes still closed, think of Guru Siyag's image at the place between your eyebrows (also known as the third eye). This means that you have to try to imagine Guru Siyag's picture in your mind. While thinking of the image, repeat silently (Chant) for 15 minutes the mantra given by Guru Siyag. To receive the mantra, go to the section "How to Get Mantra". During meditation, you may experience certain automatic yogic postures or movement of your limbs. Swaying, nodding of head, rapid movement of head from left-to-right or vice versa, inflating or deflating of belly, clapping, grunting, moaning or laughing can happen in many cases. Do not panic or worry. These actions, happen involuntarily, are ordained by divine force, and they are needed for your internal cleansing and readying you for further progress. You may also experience vibrations, see bright lights, colors or even have visions or revelations of the past and future events. These are indications that you are progressing well on the spiritual path. However, if you do not experience any yogic postures or see visions, it does not mean that are not making progress. In all probability, the divine force awakened in you has perhaps decided that you don't need these experiences. Go to the "FAQ" section to read more on this topic.. You will notice that your meditation will come to an end exactly when you reach the time limit you had set prior to starting meditation. GSSY Can Be Practiced: By Anyone of any religion, creed, nationality Anytime morning, noon, evening, night For any duration 5, 10, 12, 15, 30 minutes Anywhere office, home, bus, train Anyplace on chair, bed, floor, couch In any position cross-legged, lying down, sitting on chair Facing any direction East, west, south, north etc. By any age child, young, middle-aged, old For any disease physical or mental and freedom from any kind of addiction For freedom from any stress related to family, business, work or existential questions. More info on - *******www.the-comforter**** *******gurusiyagsiddhayoga.wordpress****
21 Jan 2011
281
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