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4:34
MRJ aka. Matthew Russell Jones is a fresh cut, home-grown singer songwriter, delivering a uniquely addictive pop sound that’s carving a sharp edge into the British scene. His debut single, ‘Bliss’ released on 14 April, is testament to MRJ’s divided love between acoustic and electronic and with celeb fans including the likes of Perez Hilton, MRJ is most definitely a ‘one to watch’ artist for 2017. ‘Bliss’ is a divine slice of serene pop, one of those chilled songs, which beautifully skips and loops the distinctive vocals of MRJ around a solid sound-bed of beats. Opening up his own life as a living songbook, MRJ wrote ‘Bliss’ as a positive awakening from a bitter heartbreak….. It was the end of 2015 and he’d had spent a year pouring out his heart-wrenching emotions through his lyrics and songwriting – time to turn a corner and look at the bright side; that’s when ‘Bliss’ was conceived. It’s a track depicting the ‘letting go’ of a deeply entrenched relationship, a biographical track that comes from the heart; a reassuringly chilled vibe that most of us can relate to. The video to ‘Bliss’ was directed by Jay Parpworth and was filmed in double time in Kent during the dead cold of November. It’s a ‘one-shot’ style with no edits at all, adding to the atmospheric effect of the movie. The video tells the story of a gay man, experimenting and juggling with hetrosexual love and finally realising where his true happiness lies. It’s the story of MRJ.
30 Mar 2017
37
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6:19
Originally written in Sanskrit, Panchatantra tales have been running since decades. Encompassing novel and virtuous stories, they have been a great source of learning for the children. Above is another fine tale that depicts the roguery of humans and likewise their unwise decision making.
30 Mar 2017
7
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2:12
Rangoli is an art form native to Nepal, India and Bangladesh (known as Alpana) in which patterns are created on the floor in living rooms or courtyards using materials such as colored rice, dry flour, colored sand or flower petals. It is usually made during Diwali or Tihar (collectively known as Deepawali) , Onam, Pongal and other Indian, Bangladeshi and Nepalese festivals related to Hinduism. Designs are passed from one generation to the next, keeping both the art form and the tradition alive. The various names for this art form and similar practices include Kolam in Tamil Nadu, Mandana in Rajasthan, Chowkpurana in Chhattisgarh, Alpana in West Bengal, Aripana in Bihar, Chowk pujan in Uttar Pradesh, Muggu in Andhra Pradesh, Golam kolam or kalam in Kerala and others. The purpose of rangoli is decoration, and it is thought to bring good luck. Design depictions may also vary as they reflect traditions, folklore and practices that are unique to each area. It is traditionally done by women. Generally, this practice is showcased during occasions such as festivals, auspicious observances, marriage celebrations and other similar milestones and gatherings. In Nepal, Colorful rangoli are made from dyes and are lit up at night outside peoples homes and businesses. Rangoli designs can be simple geometric shapes, deity impressions, or flower and petal shapes (appropriate for the given celebrations), but they can also be very elaborate designs crafted by numerous people. The base material is usually dry or wet powdered rice or dry flour, to which sindoor (vermilion), haldi (turmeric) and other natural colours can be added. Chemical colors are a modern variation. Other materials include colored sand, red brick powder and even flowers and petals, as in the case of flower rangolis.
4 Apr 2017
100
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2:53
Rangoli is an art form native to Nepal, India and Bangladesh (known as Alpana) in which patterns are created on the floor in living rooms or courtyards using materials such as colored rice, dry flour, colored sand or flower petals. It is usually made during Diwali or Tihar (collectively known as Deepawali) , Onam, Pongal and other Indian, Bangladeshi and Nepalese festivals related to Hinduism. Designs are passed from one generation to the next, keeping both the art form and the tradition alive. The various names for this art form and similar practices include Kolam in Tamil Nadu, Mandana in Rajasthan, Chowkpurana in Chhattisgarh, Alpana in West Bengal, Aripana in Bihar, Chowk pujan in Uttar Pradesh, Muggu in Andhra Pradesh, Golam kolam or kalam in Kerala and others. The purpose of rangoli is decoration, and it is thought to bring good luck. Design depictions may also vary as they reflect traditions, folklore and practices that are unique to each area. It is traditionally done by women. Generally, this practice is showcased during occasions such as festivals, auspicious observances, marriage celebrations and other similar milestones and gatherings. In Nepal, Colorful rangoli are made from dyes and are lit up at night outside peoples homes and businesses. Rangoli designs can be simple geometric shapes, deity impressions, or flower and petal shapes (appropriate for the given celebrations), but they can also be very elaborate designs crafted by numerous people. The base material is usually dry or wet powdered rice or dry flour, to which sindoor (vermilion), haldi (turmeric) and other natural colours can be added. Chemical colors are a modern variation. Other materials include colored sand, red brick powder and even flowers and petals, as in the case of flower rangolis.
4 Apr 2017
82
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1:10
Red, Blue, Yellow and Green are the four psychological primary colors around us. Red relates to the body, Blue to the mind, Yellow to the emotions and Green depicts the essential balance between the stated three. Interior Design Bangalore has cumulated a detailed survey on color patterns. There are totally 11 basic colors and their psychological properties are mentioned
8 Apr 2017
14
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3:31
This Animation Depicts the importance of the biggest gift that we all got "Life"
9 Apr 2017
51
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3:31
This Animation Depicts the importance of the biggest gift that we all got "Life"
9 Apr 2017
53
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6:01
The video depicts the story of two founders of Han Mo Qing Yi, an animation production company in Beijing that brings life to Peking Opera characters in its cartoon way.
18 Apr 2017
7
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6:01
The video depicts the story of Zhang Yanfang, a Chinese painter that expresses with her art the anxiety of transitioning from childhood to adulthood.
18 Apr 2017
6
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6:01
The video depicts the story of David Jia, the founder of LKK Sansa Brand and a industrial designer who is eager for design that reflects Chinese culture and character.
18 Apr 2017
7
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6:01
The video depicts the story of Pan Dinghao, the founder of Panda Brew Pub, which is one of the most popular home-brewed beer pubs in Beijing.
19 Apr 2017
3
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6:01
The video depicts the story of bicycle fans who brought into China an Britain-origin bicycle projects called Tweed Run.
19 Apr 2017
3
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6:00
The video depicts the story of Flora Zeta Cheong-Leen who is dedicated to ballet education in China.
19 Apr 2017
5
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6:01
The video depicts the story of Lost and Found, a Chinese furniture brand that sketches Chinese culture and spirit.
19 Apr 2017
2
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6:01
The video depicts the story of Sun Ke, a floral arrangement teacher in Beijing.
19 Apr 2017
3
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0:13
*******www.aviationvids**** This amazing Quicktime movie shows the same flight path visualization as the National Airspace Depiction video, above, but plots the individual aircraft as individual points.
25 Jun 2007
1023
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