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2:09
Hero is the first game to take you into a real dungeon, one where a shadowy evil has come to feed on despair. This a dungeon at war - not a place with bags of gold just lying around!
17 Jul 2007
1708
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2:54
Hero is the first game to take you into a real dungeon, one where a shadowy evil has come to feed on despair. This a dungeon at war - not a place with bags of gold just lying around!
20 Jul 2007
978
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4:53
A Music Video focusing on the growing companionship of Jade and Double H during their adventure, illustrated by flashbacks during Jade's moment of despair, reminding her of what she can accomplish together with her companion. That there is still hope as long as she's not alone.
24 Aug 2007
374
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1:42
Creature's The Darkest Passage into the Depths of Doom and Despair session at the Vans Downtown Showdown 2007.
26 Oct 2007
475
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1:01
First Survey of IC Patients Reveals Emotional Distress Associated with Frequently Misdiagnosed Condition The National Association of Nurse Practitioners in Women’s Health (NPWH) today announced Wednesday, October 31st as the first annual National Interstitial Cystitis (IC) Awareness Day. To mark the day, NPWH, with support from Ortho Women’s Health & Urology, revealed the results of the first survey of IC patients highlighting their frustration and despair, and new educational resources to help women recognize and manage their symptoms. Results from the survey, available on AllAboutIC****, showed that respondents expressed very high levels of emotional distress. Nearly all respondents — 95 percent — felt frustrated from dealing with IC and its symptoms. Most said they had been annoyed or angry (85 percent), 75 percent reported feeling depressed, and more than two thirds (67 percent) felt alone/isolated and embarrassed.
31 Oct 2007
2261
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0:54
After a disappointing tussle with Librarian Marm, Captain Euchre despairs over the quality of local super villains.
6 Nov 2007
229
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0:44
Winner of two Academy Awards, The Quiet One is the pointed and powerful documentary-style account of the rehabilitation of a mentally disturbed African American child. It is also a provocative glimpse at the Wiltwyck School for Boys in the forties, a walk through vintage American education. The poor child is completely misunderstood and neglected. Against all despair, he finds hope. Simple, yet deeply touching, The Quiet One is an extremely important film. Interestingly, the issue of race is not touched upon, though in the forties it was certainly of note that the film is about a black youth.
4 Dec 2007
721
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4:06
Brokenhearted young Kon despairs and sets foot in dense forest of Mt.Fuji to commit suicide. But it was not easy to die. While various thought came and went, Kon continued wandering in a forest. And at last, the thing which Kon found was a hope to live...
24 Dec 2007
329
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1:08
*******RecognizedExpert**** If the thought of writing a book seems overwhelming, don't despair. Consider writing a tips booklet. It's easy, profitable and fun to do. Learn how to write your very own tips booklet.
29 Dec 2007
165
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1:29
Members of Two Empty Chairs share their favorite verses. Phil. 4:6-7 helped Josh Bryant get through times of despair and worry. As a 15 year old experiencing the divorce of his minister father and his mother Cliff Preston clung to Romans 8:37 as a reminder that in Christ we win!
30 Jan 2008
251
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1:31
Got Herpes? Do not despair. You are not alone. 1 in 5 men and 1 in 4 women are living with herpes. Don't Let Genital Herpes Run or Ruin Your Life. Dating and relationship help for people with genital herpes now at *******www.STDromance****
1 Feb 2008
3706
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7:51
How Do We Reverse the Brain Drain? Keynote speech by Emeagwali [emeagwali****] delivered on October 24, 2003, at the Pan-African Conference on Brain Drain, Elsah, Illinois USA. The entire transcript, letters and photos are posted at *******emeagwali****/speeches/brain-drain/to-brain-gain/reverse-brain-drain-from-africa.html. Permission to reproduce is granted. Thank you for the pleasant introduction as well as for inviting me to share my thoughts on turning “brain drain” into “brain gain.” For 10 million African-born emigrants, the word “home” is synonymous with the United States, Britain or other country outside of Africa. Personally, I have lived continuously in the United States for the past 30 years. My last visit to Africa was 17 years ago. On the day I left Nigeria, I felt sad because I was leaving my family behind. I believed I would return eight years later, probably marry an Igbo girl, and then spend the rest of my life in Nigeria. But 25 years ago, I fell in love with an American girl, married her three years later, and became eligible to sponsor a Green Card visa for my 35 closest relatives, including my parents and all my siblings, nieces and nephews. The story of how I brought 35 people to the United States exemplifies how 10 million skilled people have emigrated out of Africa during the past 30 years. We came to the United States on student visas and then changed our status to become permanent residents and then naturalized citizens. Our new citizenship status helped us sponsor relatives, and also inspired our friends to immigrate here. Ten million Africans now constitute an invisible nation that resides outside Africa. Although invisible, it is a nation as populous as Angola, Malawi, Zambia or Zimbabwe. If it were to be a nation with distinct borders, it would have an income roughly equivalent to Africa’s gross domestic product. Although the African Union does not recognize the African Diaspora as a nation, the International Monetary Fund (IMF) acknowledges its economic importance. The IMF estimates the African Diaspora now constitutes the biggest group of foreign investors in Africa. Take for example Western Union. It estimates that it is not atypical for an immigrant to wire 00 per month to relatives in Africa. If you assume that most Africans living outside Africa send money each month and you do the math, you will agree with the IMF that the African Diaspora is indeed the largest foreign investor in Africa. What few realize is that Africans who immigrate to the United States contribute 40 times more wealth to the American than to the African economy. According to the United Nations, an African professional working in the United States contributes about 50,000 per year to the U.S. economy. Again, if you do the math, you will realize that the African professional remitting 00 per month to Africa is contributing 40 times more to the United States economy than to the African one. On a relative scale, that means for every 00 per month a professional African sends home, that person contributes 2,000 per month to the U.S. economy. Of course, the issue more important than facts and figures is eliminating poverty in Africa, not merely reducing it by sending money to relatives. Money alone cannot eliminate poverty in Africa, because even one million dollars is a number with no intrinsic value. Real wealth cannot be measured by money, yet we often confuse money with wealth. Under the status quo, Africa would still remain poor even if we were to send all the money in the world there. Ask someone who is ill what “wealth” means, and you will get a very different answer than from most other people. If you were HIV-positive, you would gladly exchange one million dollars to become HIV-negative. When you give your money to your doctor, that physician helps you convert your money into health - or rather, wealth. Money cannot teach your children. Teachers can. Money cannot bring electricity to your home. Engineers can. Money cannot cure sick people. Doctors can. Because it is only a nation’s human capital that can be converted into real wealth, that human capital is much more valuable than its financial capital. A few years ago, Zambia had 1,600 medical doctors. Today, Zambia has only 400 medical doctors. Kenya retains only 10% of the nurses and doctors trained there. A similar story is told from South Africa to Ghana. I also speak from my family experiences. After contributing 25 years to Nigerian society as a nurse, my father retired on a 5-per-month pension. By comparison, my four sisters each earn 5 per hour as nurses in the United States. If my father had had the opportunity my sisters did, he certainly would have immigrated to the United States as a young nurse. The “brain drain” explains, in part, why affluent Africans fly to London for their medical treatments. Furthermore, because a significant percentage of African doctors and nurses practice in U.S. hospitals, we can reasonably conclude that African medical schools are de facto serving the American people, not Africa. A recent World Bank survey shows that African universities are exporting a large percentage of their graduating manpower to the United States. In a given year, the World Bank estimates that 70,000 skilled Africans immigrate to Europe and the United States. While these 70,000 skilled Africans are fleeing the continent in search of employment and decent wages, 100,000 skilled expatriates who are paid wages higher than the prevailing rate in Europe are hired to replace them. In Nigeria, the petroleum industry hires about 1,000 skilled expatriates, even though we can find similar skills within the African Diaspora. Instead of developing its own manpower resources, Nigeria prefers to contract out its oil exploration despite the staggeringly high price of having to concede 40% of its profits to foreign oil companies. In a pre-independence day editorial, the Vanguard (Nigeria) queried: “Why would the optimism of 1960 give way to the despair of 2000?” My answer is this: Nigeria achieved political independence in 1960, but by the year 2000 had not yet achieved technological independence. During colonial rule, Nigeria retained only 50% of the profits from oil derived from its own territory. Four decades after this colonial rule ended, the New York Times (December 22, 2002) wrote that “40 percent of the oil revenue goes to Chevron, [and] 60 percent to the [Nigerian] government.” As a point of comparison, the United States would never permit a Nigerian oil company to retain 40% of the profits from a Texas oilfield. Our African homelands have paid an extraordinary price for their lack of domestic technological knowledge. Because of that lack of knowledge, since it gained independence in 1960, Nigeria has relinquished 40% of its oilfields and 00 billion to American and European stockholders. Because of that lack of knowledge, Nigeria exports crude petroleum, only to import refined petroleum. Because of that lack of knowledge, Africa exports raw steel, only to import cars that are essentially steel products. Knowledge is the engine that drives economic growth, and Africa cannot eliminate poverty without first increasing and nurturing its intellectual capital. Reversing the “brain drain” will increase Africa’s intellectual capital while also increasing its wealth in many, many different ways. Can the “brain drain” be reversed? My answer is: yes. But in order for it to happen, we must try something different. At this point, I want to inject a new idea into this dialogue. For my idea to work, it requires that we tap the talents and skills of the African Diaspora. It requires that we create one million high-tech jobs in Africa. It requires that we move one million high-tech jobs from the United States to Africa. I know you are wondering: How can we move one million jobs from the United States to Africa? It can be done. In fact, by the year 2015 the U.S. Department of Labor expects to lose an estimated 3.3 million call center jobs to developing nations. In this area, what we as Africans need to do is develop a strategic plan – one that will persuade multinational companies that it will be more profitable to move their call centers to nations in Africa instead of India. These high-tech jobs include those in call centers, customer service and help desks – all of which are suitable for unemployed university graduates. The reason these jobs could now emerge in Africa is that recent technological advances such as the Internet and mobile telephones now make it practical, cheaper and otherwise advantageous to move these services to developing nations, where lower wages prevail. If Africa succeeds in capturing one million of these high-tech jobs, they could provide more revenues than all the African oilfields. These “greener pastures” would lure back talent and, in turn, create a reverse “brain drain.” Again, we have a rare and unique window of opportunity to convert projected American job losses into Africa’s job gain, and thus change the “brain drain” to “brain gain.” However, aggressive action must be taken before this window of opportunity closes. India is a formidable competitor. Therefore, we need to determine the cost savings realized by outsourcing call center jobs to Africa instead of India. That cost saving will be used as a selling point to corporations interested in outsourcing jobs. A typical call center employee might be a housewife using a laptop computer and a cell phone to work from her home. As night settles and her children go to bed, she could place a phone call to Los Angeles, which is 10 hours behind her time zone. An American answers her call and she says, “Good morning, this is Zakiya.” Using a standard, rehearsed script, she tries to sell an American product. Now that USA-to-Africa telephone calls are as low as 6 cents per minute, it is economically feasible for a telephone sales person to reside in Anglophone Africa while virtually employed in the United States, and – this is important - paying income taxes only to her country in Africa. I will give one more example of how thousands of call center jobs can be created in Africa. It is well known that U.S. companies often give up on collecting outstanding account balances of less than 0 each. The reason is that it often costs 0 in American labor to recover that 0. By comparison, I believe it would cost only 0 in African labor (including the 6 cents per minute phone call) to collect an outstanding balance of 0. Earlier, the organizers of this Pan African Conference gave me a note containing eleven questions. The first was: Do skilled Africans have the moral obligation to remain and work in Africa? I believe those with skills should be encouraged and rewarded to stay, work, and raise their families in Africa. When that happens, a large middle class will be created, thereby reducing the conditions that give rise to civil war and corruption. Then, a true revitalization and renaissance will occur. The second question was: Should skilled African emigrants be compelled to return to Africa? I believe controlling emigration will be very difficult. Instead, I recommend the United Nations impose a “brain gain tax” upon those nations benefiting from the “brain drain.” Each year, the United States creates a brain drain by issuing 135,000 H1-B visas to “outstanding researchers” and persons with “extraordinary ability.” The U.S. Internal Revenue Service (IRS), working in tangent with the Immigration and Naturalization Service (INS), could be required to credit one month’s salary, each year, to the country of birth of each immigrant. Already, the IRS allows U.S. taxpayers to make voluntary contributions to election funds. Similarly, it could allow immigrants to voluntarily pay taxes to their country of birth, instead of to the United States. The third question was: Why don’t we encourage unemployed Africans to seek employment abroad? Put differently, if all the nurses and doctors in Africa were to win the U.S. visa lottery, who will operate our hospitals? If we encourage 8 million talented Africans to emigrate, what will we encourage their remaining 800 million brothers and sisters to do? The fourth question was: Should we blame the African Diaspora for Africa's problems? Yes, the Diaspora should be blamed in part, because the absence it’s created has diminished the continent’s intellectual capital and thus created the vacuum enabling dictators and corruption to flourish. The likes of Idi Amin, Jean-Bedel Bokassa and Mobutu Sese Seko would not be able to declare themselves president-for-life of nations who have a large, educated middle class. The fifth question was: Should we not blame Africa’s leaders for siphoning money from Africa’s treasuries? It becomes a vicious circle: the flight of intellectual capital increases the flight of financial capital which in turn increases again the flight of intellectual capital. Leadership is a collective process, and “brain drain” reduces the collective brainpower needed to fight corruption and mismanagement. For example, the leadership of the Central Bank of Nigeria did not call a news conference after Sani Abacha stole billion dollars from it. The bank’s Governor-General did not go on a hunger strike. He did not report the robbery to the police. He did not file a lawsuit. Had they the intellectual manpower to counter corruption, the results would have been very different. The sixth question was: Is it possible to achieve an African renaissance? Because by definition, a renaissance is the revival and flowering of the arts, literature and sciences, it must be preceded by a growth in the continent’s intellectual capital, or the collective knowledge of the people. The best African musicians live in France. The top African writers live in the United States or Britain. The soccer superstars live in Europe. It will be impossible to achieve a renaissance without the contributions of the talented. The seventh question was: For how long has the “brain drain” problem existed? A common misconception is that the African “brain drain” started 40 years ago. In reality, it actually began ten times that long. Four hundred years ago, most people of African descent lived in Africa. Today, one in five of African descent live in the Americas. Therefore, measured in numbers, the largest “brain drain” resulted from the trans-Atlantic slave trade. Contrary to what people believed, Africa experienced a brain gain during the first half of the 20th century. Schools, hospitals and banks were built by the British colonialists. These institutions were the visible manifestations of brain gain. At the end of colonial rule, skilled Europeans fled the continent. Skilled Africans started fleeing the continent in the 1970s, 80s, and 90s. The result was the widespread rise of despotic rulers. The eighth question was: Is brain
24 Jul 2010
1427
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8:50
Indie Fever is a public service announcement about the dangers of Independent Filmmaking. It was produced with the idea that if we could save one person from a life of despair as an independent filmmaker then it would be worth it.
18 Feb 2008
93
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0:30
Having returned victorious from their battle with Frieza, the Z-fighters can at last breathe a collective sigh of relief... But they won't have long to rest. A new host of villains has appeared, ready to wreak havoc on the Earth - and Goku, the Z-Fighters' greatest hero, is still missing! In the face of these new dangers, a mysterious youth with Super Saiyan powers has come bearing a bleak prediction for the future: in just three years' time, an evil greater than any the Z-Fighters have ever faced will emerge to cast a shadow of destruction and despair over the Earth. If the young Saiyan's prediction is correct, the Z-Fighters will have to train like they have never trained before in order to have any hope against these seemingly unstoppable foes: the Androids! Contains the Complete Garlic Jr., Trunks, and Android sagas - 32 episodes - with revised English dialogue and original Japanese music. Find out more at *******www.dragonballz****
3 Apr 2008
3639
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1:00
Contains both The History of Trunks and Bardock: The Father of Goku! The History of Trunks When Goku dies of a deadly virus, it seems like the end of the world. But the powerful Master's passing proves to be merely a presage of the horrible tragedies that are on the way! When two Androids appear and start destroying the great cities of the Earth, the planet is plunged into darkness and its inhabitants are living in fear. But there is one last hope! Goku's son, Gohan, is now a man, and though outnumbered by the demonic Androids, he does have a special young teenager named Trunks on his side! As Gohan trains Trunks, it seems like the world is collapsing around them! Can they put a stop to the horrible progression of evil? This is the story of the future that never was! Bardock: The Father of Goku When a low-class Saiyan soldier named Bardock unexpectedly inherits the ability to see into the future, his life takes a dramatic turn for the worse! Haunted by vision of his own end as well as the destruction of his entire planet, Bardock sets off on a nightmarish race with fate to avert the impending disaster. But Bardock seems to be stumbling along in a maze of hopeless despair until a vision of his baby son, Kakarot, as a grown man inspires him to make a change and confront his destiny head on! This is the story of Bardock, the father of Goku! Visit *******www.dragonballz**** for more info.
2 Jul 2008
2943
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0:46
The Student Loan Ninjette can teach you the ways of student loans from finding low interest loans to consolidating. If nothing else, she'll show you how to properly use a plunger. Receiving a great education is among the most vital things we can do to guarantee our success in this world. Education is the key that can open doors to new opportunities. It'll help us to aid others and to make a difference in the world. However, obtaining a good education isn't free. Tuition alone can cost anywhere between $4,000 and $120,000 a year! For this reason, numerous students simply dont have the ability to pay for college and, therefore, are forced to investigate other options. Taking out a private student loan is an option that students may want to consider. What is a Private Student Loan? Private student loans, or alternative student loans, are loans taken out from anywhere besides the government. Alternative student loans can be taken from banks, credit unions, or other financial institutions. These loans are not funded by the government and so they are not subject to Federal orders. Private student loans are chiefly for people who decide against Federal student loans (such as the Stafford or Perkins loan) or who want to supplement their Federal loan because it is not enough. The size of the private student loan depends on the students credit history. This is the time when always paying your credit card bill on time really pays off. How can I get a private student loan? Each financial institution will have a different list of eligibility requirements however here are some of the requirements that you'll likely encounter: -You must be a citizen of the United States or a permanent resident -You should be at least 18 years old -You must be enrolled at an approved school -You must have good credit OR apply with a creditworthy cosigner Not all of the financial institutions will require these things and some of them will require more, but these are the fundamental requirements. Prior to getting a loan: SEARCH: The best way to find the loan you need is through exploring your options. Be cautious of companies that are only out there to rip you off. If an offer appears too good to be true than it probably is. Take a good look at your options to be sure that you are getting the best loan and that it isnt a scam. SCRUTINIZE: When you have found the loan you wish to take out, sit down and carefully read the document. Never sign a contract that you have not read or havent read completely. Understand fully the kind of agreement youre making with this company. If you are confused about something, don't be scared to ask. Feeling slightly stupid up front is much better than feeling terribly stupid when you have to pay out an extra couple thousand dollars simply because you did not take the time to fully understand the agreement. SIMPLIFY: Simplify your college life by deciding now that you will constantly pay your bills promptly. If you dont it will enlarge your loan and your debt and bring extra stress into your life. Choosing to pay your bills on time each month will help you stay out of the deep abyss of debt and despair.
21 Feb 2008
1186
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