Results for: ergo Search Results
Family Filter:
6:29
2010 Cali Rally: Hooters Checkpoint Challenge
28 Apr 2012
46
Share Video

6:29
2010 Cali Rally: Hooters Checkpoint Challenge
29 Apr 2012
46
Share Video

6:29
2010 Cali Rally: Hooters Checkpoint Challenge
30 Apr 2012
52
Share Video

6:29
2010 Cali Rally: Hooters Checkpoint Challenge
1 May 2012
40
Share Video

6:29
2010 Cali Rally: Hooters Checkpoint Challenge
2 May 2012
41
Share Video

6:29
2010 Cali Rally: Hooters Checkpoint Challenge
2 May 2012
520
Share Video

9:24
Innersection.tv sensation Albee Layer pays a visit to Cote's Cube. Check out Albee and Matt Meola's blog at meolalayerproductions****.
19 Jul 2012
414
Share Video

16:59
Les 20 ans de Caroline. Diaporama de photos en musique : Arroro (berceuse de Majorque) + Litanei, de Franz Schubert (version arrangée pour choeur, voix solo, piano & orchestre symphonique). Diaporama de photos, avec musique : - Arroro (berceuse de Majorque), pour voix solo (ténor) + choeur mixte - Litanei, de Franz Schubert (1797–1828), en version arrangée pour choeur, voix solo, piano et orchestre symphonique. Litanei demeure assurément l’un des plus émouvants et accomplis, émanant du génie mélodique & harmonique de Franz Schubert ! La synergie musicale spirituelle particulièrement aigue, délicate et la symbiose élégiaque ne peuvent qu’aller droit au cœur. This beautiful song was composed by Franz Schubert in 1818 (last of the Jacobi songs) for the celebration of All Saint's Day and then subsequently arranged for solo voice, male choir, piano & symphonic orchestra. Of a deep devotional nature, this Lied shows an exquisite example of humble affection. Each verse ends with the refrain: - Alle Seelen, Ruhn in Frieden - All Souls rest in peace Franz Schubert Franz Schubert Franz Seraphicus Peter Schubert (January 31, 1797 – November 19, 1828) was an Austrian composer. He wrote some 600 Lieder, seven completed symphonies, the famous "Unfinished Symphony", liturgical music, operas, and a large body of chamber and solo piano music. He is particularly noted for his original melodic and harmonic writing. While Schubert had a close circle of friends and associates who admired his work (including his teacher Antonio Salieri, and the prominent singer Johann Michael Vogl), wider appreciation of his music during his lifetime was limited at best. He was never able to secure adequate permanent employment, and for most of his career he relied on the support of friends and family. Interest in Schubert's work increased dramatically following his death. Biography Early life and education Schubert was born in Vienna, Austria on January 31, 1797. His father Franz Theodor Florian, the son of a Moravian peasant, was a parish schoolmaster; his mother Elizabeth Vietz was the daughter of a Silesian master locksmith, and had also been a housemaid for a Viennese family prior to her marriage. Of the Schuberts' fifteen children (one illegitimate child was born in 1789), ten died in infancy; only four survived. Their father Franz Theodor was a well-known teacher, and his school on the Himmelpfortgrund was well attended.[citation needed] He was not a famous musician, but he taught his son what he could of music. At the age of five, Schubert began receiving regular instruction from his father and a year later was enrolled at the Himmelpfortgrund school. His formal musical education also began around the same time. His father continued to teach him the basics of the violin. At seven, Schubert was placed under the instruction of Michael Holzer. Holzer's lessons seem to have mainly consisted of conversations and expressions of admiration[1] and the boy gained more from his acquaintance with a friendly joiner's apprentice who used to take him to a neighboring pianoforte warehouse where he was given the opportunity to practice on better instruments. The unsatisfactory nature of Schubert's early training was even more pronounced during his time given that composers could expect little chance of success unless they were also able to appeal to the public as performers. To this end, Schubert's meager musical education was never entirely sufficient. In October 1808, he was received as a pupil at the Stadtkonvikt (Imperial religious boarding school) through a choir scholarship. It was at the Stadtkonvikt that Schubert was introduced to the overtures and symphonies of Mozart. His exposure to these pieces as well as various lighter compositions combined with his occasional visits to the opera set the foundation for his greater musical knowledge. Franz Schubert aged 16, drawn by Leopold KupelweiserMeanwhile, his genius was already beginning to show itself in his compositions. Antonio Salieri, a leading composer of the period, became aware of the talented young man and decided to train him in musical composition and music theory. Schubert's early essay in chamber music is noticeable, since we learn that at the time a regular quartet-party was established at his home "on Sundays and holidays," in which his two brothers played the violin, his father the cello and Franz himself the viola. It was the first germ of that amateur orchestra for which, in later years, many of his compositions were written. During the remainder of his stay at the Stadtkonvikt he wrote a good deal more chamber music, several songs, some miscellaneous pieces for the pianoforte and, among his more ambitious efforts, a Kyrie (D.31) and Salve Regina (D.27), an octet for wind instruments (D.72/72a) - said to commemorate the death of his mother, which took place in 1812 - a cantata (D.110), words and music, for his father's name-day in 1813, and the closing work of his school-life, his first symphony (D.82). Teacher at his father's school At the end of 1813 he left the Stadtkonvikt and entered his father's school as teacher of the lowest class. In the meantime, his father remarried, this time to Anna Kleyenboeck, the daughter of a silk dealer from the suburb Gumpendorf. For over two years the young man endured the drudgery of the work, which he performed with very indifferent success. There were, however, other interests to compensate. He received private lessons in composition from Salieri, who did more for Schubert’s training than any of his other teachers. Supported by friends As 1815 was the most prolific period of Schubert's life, 1816 saw the first real change in his fortunes. Somewhere about the turn of the year Spaun surprised him in the composition of Erlkönig (D.328, published as Op.1) — Goethe's poem propped among a heap of exercise books, and the boy at white-heat of inspiration "hurling" the notes on the music-paper. A few weeks later Franz von Schober, a student of good family and some means, who had heard some of Schubert's songs at Spaun's house, came to pay a visit to the composer and proposed to carry him off from school-life and give him freedom to practice his art in peace. The proposal was particularly opportune, for Schubert had just made an unsuccessful application for the post of Kapellmeister at Laibach (the German name for Ljubljana), and was feeling more acutely than ever the slavery of the classroom. His father's consent was readily given, and before the end of the spring he was installed as a guest in Schober's lodgings. For a time he attempted to increase the household resources by giving music lessons, but they were soon abandoned, and he devoted himself to composition. "I write all day," he said later to an inquiring visitor, "and when I have finished one piece I begin another." All this time his circle of friends was steadily widening. Mayrhofer introduced him to Johann Michael Vogl, a famous baritone, who did him good service by performing his songs in the salons of Vienna; Anselm Hüttenbrenner and his brother Joseph ranged themselves among his most devoted admirers; Joseph von Gahy, an excellent pianist, played his sonatas and fantasias; the Sonnleithners, a burgher family whose eldest son had been at the Stadtkonvikt, gave him free access to their home, and organized in his honor musical parties which soon assumed the name of Schubertiaden. The material needs of life were supplied without much difficulty. No doubt Schubert was entirely penniless, for he had given up teaching, he could earn nothing by public performance, and, as yet, no publisher would take his music at a gift; but his friends came to his aid with true Bohemian generosity — one found him lodging, another found him appliances, they took their meals together and the man who had any money paid the score. Schubert was always the leader of the party, but more often than not, was penniless. Though he was known by half a dozen affectionate nicknames, the most characteristic was kann er 'was? ("Is he able?") or more colloquially, "Can he pay?" (for the food and drink), his usual question when a new acquaintance was introduced. Another nickname was "The Little Mushroom" as Schubert was only five feet, one and one-half inches tall (1.56 m), and tended to corpulence. The compositions of 1820 are remarkable, and show a marked advance in development and maturity of style. The unfinished oratorio "Lazarus" (D.689) was begun in February; later followed, amid a number of smaller works, by the 23rd Psalm (D.706), the Gesang der Geister (D.705/714), the Quartettsatz in C minor (D.703), and the "Wanderer Fantasy" for piano (D.760). But of almost more biographical interest is the fact that in this year two of Schubert's operas appeared at the Kärntnerthor Theater, Die Zwillingsbrüder (D.647) on June 14, and Die Zauberharfe (D.644) on August 19. Hitherto his larger compositions (apart from Masses) had been restricted to the amateur orchestra at the Gundelhof, a society which grew out of the quartet-parties at his home. Now he began to assume a more prominent position and address a wider public. Still, however, publishers remained obstinately aloof, and it was not until his friend Vogl had sung Erlkönig at a concert (Feb. 8, 1821) that Anton Diabelli hesitatingly agreed to print some of his works on commission. The first seven opus numbers (all songs) appeared on these terms; then the commission ceased, and he began to receive the meagre pittances which were all that the great publishing houses ever accorded to him. Much has been written about the neglect from which he suffered during his lifetime. It was not the fault of his friends, it was only indirectly the fault of the Viennese public; the persons most to blame were the cautious intermediaries who stinted and hindered him from publication. The production of his two dramatic pieces turned Schubert's attention more firmly than ever in the direction of the stage; and towards the end of 1821 he set himself on a course which for nearly three years brought him continuous mortification and disappointment. Alfonso und Estrella was refused, and so was Fierabras (D.796); Die Verschworenen (D.787) was prohibited by the censor (apparently on the ground of its title); Rosamunde (D.797) was withdrawn after two nights, owing to the poor quality of its libretto. Of these works the two former are written on a scale which would make their performances exceedingly difficult (Fierabras, for instance, contains over 1,000 pages of manuscript score), but Die Verschworenen is a bright attractive comedy, and Rosamunde contains some of the most charming music that Schubert ever composed. In 1822 he made the acquaintance both of Weber and of Beethoven, but little came of it in either case, though Beethoven cordially acknowledged his genius, the quote attributed to Beethoven being: "Truly, the spark of divine genius resides in this Schubert!" Schober was away from Vienna; new friends appeared of a less desirable character; on the whole these were the darkest years of his life. In 1994 musicologist Rita Steblin discovered Schubert's brother Karl's marriage petition on the attic floor of the Lichtental church. The composer's own wish to marry Therese Grob was hindered by Metternich's harsh marriage consent law of 1815, as Schubert's heart-rending cry in his diary of September 1816 makes clear. Last years and masterworks In 1823 appeared Schubert's first song cycle, Die schöne Müllerin (D.795), after poems by Wilhelm Müller. This work, together with the later cycle "Winterreise" (D.911; also written to texts of Müller) is widely considered one of the pinnacles of Schubert's work and of the German Lied in general. The piece "Du bist die Ruh" ("My sweet repose") was also composed during this year. In the spring of 1824 he wrote the Octet in F (D.803), "A Sketch for a Grand Symphony"; and in the summer went back to Želiezovce, when he became attracted by Hungarian idiom, and wrote the Divertissement a l'Hongroise (D.818) and the String Quartet in A minor (D.804). He held a hopeless passion for his pupil Countess Karoline Eszterházy; but whatever may be said about this romance, its details are not presently known. Despite his preoccupation with the stage and later with his official duties, he found time during these years for a good deal of miscellaneous composition. The Mass in A flat (D.678) was completed and the "Unfinished Symphony" (Symphony No. 8 in B minor, D.759) begun in 1822. The question of why the symphony was "unfinished" has been debated endlessly and is still unresolved. To 1824, beside the works mentioned above, belong the variations for flute and piano on Trockne Blumen, from the cycle Die schöne Müllerin. There is also a sonata for piano and arpeggione (D.821). This music is nowadays usually played by either cello or viola and piano, although a number of other arrangements have been made. The mishaps of the recent years were compensated by the prosperity and happiness of 1825. Publication had been moving more rapidly; the stress of poverty was for a time lightened; in the summer there was a pleasant holiday in Upper Austria, where Schubert was welcomed with enthusiasm. It was during this tour that he produced his "Songs from Sir Walter Scott". This cycle contains his famous and beloved Ellens dritter Gesang (D.839). This is today more popularly, though mistakenly, referred to as "Schubert's Ave Maria"; while he had set it to Adam Storck's German translation of Scott's hymn from The Lady of the Lake that happens to open with the greeting Ave Maria and also has it for its refrain, subsequently the entire Scott/Storck text in Schubert's song came to be substituted with the complete Latin text of the traditional Ave Maria prayer; and it is in this adaptation that this song of Schubert's is commonly sung today. During this time he also wrote the Piano Sonata in A minor (D.845, Op. 42) and the Symphony No. 9 (D.944), which is believed to have been completed the following year, in 1826. From 1826 to 1828 Schubert resided continuously in Vienna, except for a brief visit to Graz in 1827. The history of his life during these three years is little more than a record of his compositions. The only events worth notice are that in 1826 he dedicated a symphony to the Gesellschaft der Musikfreunde and received an honorarium in return. In the spring of 1828 he gave, for the first and only time in his career, a public concert of his own works which was very well received. But the compositions themselves are a sufficient biography. The String Quartet in D minor (D.810), with the variations on Death and the Maiden, was written during the winter of 1825-1826, and first played on January 25, 1826. Later in the year came the String Quartet in G major, the "Rondeau brilliant" for piano and violin (D.895, Op.70), and the Piano Sonata in G (D.894, Op.78) (first published under the title "Fantasia in G"). To these should be added the three Shakespearian songs, of which "Hark! Hark! the Lark" (D.889) and "Who is Sylvia?" (D.891) were allegedly written on the same day, the former at a tavern where he broke his afternoon's walk, the latter on his return to his lodging in the evening. In 1827 Schubert wrote the song cycle Winterreise (D.911), a colossal peak of the art of art-song, the Fantasia for piano and violin in C (D.934), and the two piano trios (B flat, D.898; and E flat, D.929): in 1828 the Song of Miriam, the Mass in E-flat (D.950), the Tantum Ergo (D.962) in the same key, the String Quintet in C (D.956), the second Benedictus to the Mass in C, the last three piano sonatas, and the collection of songs published posthumously under the fanciful name of Schwanengesang ("Swan-song", D.957), which whilst not a true song cycle, retains a unity of style amongst the individual songs, touching unwonted depths of tragedy and the morbidly supernatural. Six of these are to words by Heinrich Heine, whose Buch der Lieder appeared in the autumn. The Symphony No. 9 (D.944) is dated 1828, and many modern Schubert scholars (including Brian Newbould) believe that this symphony, written in 1825-6, was revised for performance in 1828 (a fairly unusual practice for Schubert, for whom publication, let alone performance, was rarely contemplated for many of his larger-scale works during his lifetime). In the last weeks of his life he began to sketch three movements for a new Symphony in D (D.936A). The works of his last two years reveal a composer increasingly meditating on the darker side of the human psyche and human relationships, and with a deeper sense of spiritual awareness and conception of the 'beyond', reaching extraordinary depths in several chillingly dark songs of this period, especially in the larger cycles, (the song Der Doppelgaenger reaching an extraordinary climax, conveying madness at the realization of rejection and imminent death, and yet able to touch repose and communion with the infinite in the almost timeless ebb and flow of the String Quintet). Schubert expressed the wish, were he to survive his final illness, to further develop his knowledge of harmony and counterpoint. Death Schubert's grave in the Zentralfriedhof, Vienna.In the midst of this creative activity, his health deteriorated. He had battled syphilis since 1822. The final illness may have been typhoid fever, though other causes have been proposed; some of his final symptoms match those of mercury poisoning (mercury was a common treatment for syphilis in the early 19th century). At any rate, insufficient evidence remains to make a definitive diagnosis. His solace in his final illness was reading, and he had become a passionate fan of the writings of James Fenimore Cooper. He died aged 31 on Wednesday November 19, 1828 at the apartment of his brother Ferdinand in Vienna. At 3pm that afternoon "someone observed that he had ceased to breathe." By his own request, he was buried next to Beethoven, whom he had adored all his life, in the village cemetery of Währing. In 1888, both Schubert's and Beethoven's graves were moved to the Zentralfriedhof, where they can now be found next to those of Johann Strauss II and Johannes Brahms. In 1872, a memorial to Franz Schubert was erected in Vienna's Stadtpark. Souvenir souvenirs 20 ans an année années Villaz St-Pierre Suisse Switzerland Schweiz Svizzera Jean-Marie Annamarie Caroline Dévaud parcours bébé bébés bambin bambines bambina bambine enfant enfants enfance enfances adolescence famille familles familial familiaux mère père nono nona grand-mère grand-père chant chants chanteur chanteurs chœur chœurs orchestre piano cordes violon violons chanson chansons adolescent adolescents touchant touchants touchante touchantes émotion émotions célèbre célèbres mélodie mélodies connu connus connue connues mémorable mémorables inoubliable inoubliables berceuse berceuses nostalgie nostalgies nostalgique nostalgiques maman papa mamans papas anniversaire anniversaries célébration célébrations commemoration commemorations family families birthday 20 year years time times child children childhood childish baby babies daughter daughters girl girls parent parents mother mothers father fathers grand dad mum dads mums daddy daddies mummy mummies life birth naissance celebration bébé bambin gamin gamine enfance enfants enfant innocence pureté parent parents grands-parents papa maman progéniture progénitures famille family famiglia mamma nona nono Litany life birth
27 Jun 2007
3176
Share Video

4:27
The literbikes and supersports may be the hot sellers here in the States, but in our opinion there's nothing wrong with garage full of naked streetfighters. For the majority of riding situations, streetfighters, with their upright riding positions and relaxed ergos, are often a more preferable mount than the race replicas. Read the full test at www.motorcycle-usa****
6 Feb 2009
1356
Share Video

4:27
The literbikes and supersports may be the hot sellers here in the States, but in our opinion there's nothing wrong with garage full of naked streetfighters. For the majority of riding situations, streetfighters, with their upright riding positions and relaxed ergos, are often a more preferable mount than the race replicas. Read the full test at www.motorcycle-usa****
16 Feb 2008
872
Share Video

9:27
*******www.greenjoyment**** How to make and use a Solar funnel cooker Special thanks go to Steven Jones on this one, whose team at BYU invented and have perfected the solar funnel cooker. Steven says the following about the solar funnel cooker: A few years ago, I woke up to the fact that half of the world's peoples must burn wood or dried dung in order to cook their food. It came as quite a shock to me, especially as I learned of the illnesses caused by breathing smoke day in and day out, and the environmental impacts of deforestation -not to mention the time spent by people (mostly women) gathering sticks and dung to cook their food. And yet, many of these billions of people live near the equator, where sunshine is abundant and free. Ergo... The parabolic cooker involves a reflective dish that concentrates sunlight to a point where the food is cooked. This approach is very dangerous since the sun's energy is focused to a point which is very hot, but which cannot be seen. (BYU students and I built one which will set paper on fire in about 3 seconds!) I learned that an altruistic group had offered reflecting parabolas to the people living at the Altiplano in Bolivia. But more than once the parabolas had been stored next to a shed -- and the passing sun set the sheds on fire! The people did not want these dangerous, expensive devices, even though the Altiplano region has been stripped of fuel wood. The box cooker: Basically an insulated box with a glass or plastic lid, often with a reflecting lid to reflect sunlight into the box. Light enters through the top glass (or plastic), to slowly heat up the box. Problems: energy enters only through the top, while heat is escaping through all the other sides, which have a tendency to draw heat away from the food. When the box is opened to put food in or take it out, some of the heat escapes and is lost. Also, effective box cookers tend to be more complicated to build than the funnel cooker. While studying this problem, I thought again and again of the great need for a safe, inexpensive yet effective solar cooker. It finally came to me at Christmastime a few years ago, a sort of hybrid between the parabola and a box cooker. It looks like a large, deep funnel, and incorporates what I believe are the best features of the parabolic cooker and the box cooker. The first reflector was made at my home out of aluminum foil glued onto cardboard, then this was curved to form a reflective funnel. My children and I figured out a way to make a large card-board funnel easily. (I'll tell you exactly how to do this later on.) The Solar Funnel Cooker is safe and low cost, easy to make, yet very effective in capturing the sun's energy for cooking and pasteurizing water - Eureka! Later, I did extensive tests with students (including reflectivity tests) and found that aluminized Mylar was good too, but relatively expensive and rather hard to come by in large sheets. Besides, cardboard is found throughout the world and is inexpensive, and aluminum foil is also easy to come by. And individuals can make their own solar cookers easily, or start a cottage-industry to manufacture them for others. Brigham Young University submitted a patent application, mainly to insure that no company would prevent wide distribution of the Solar Funnel Cooker. BYU makes no profit from the invention. ( I later learned that a few people had had a similar idea, but with methods differing from those developed and shown here.) So now I'm trying to get the word out so that the invention can be used to capture the free energy of the sun - for camping and for emergencies, yes, but also for every day cooking where electricity is not available and even fuel wood is getting scarce. ...An idea attributed to Roger Bernard and applied now to the BYU Funnel Cooker: place a pot (having a blackened bottom and sides) in a glass bowl, and cover with a lid. Try for a tight fit around the bottom to keep hot air trapped inside. The metal pot or bowl should be supported around the rim only, with an air space all around the bottom (where the sunlight strikes it). Put a blackened lid on top of the pot. Then simply place this pot-in-bowl down in the bottom of the funnel - no plastic bag is needed! This clever method also allows the cook to simply remove the lid to check the food and to stir. I like this idea - it makes the solar cooker a lot like cooking over a fire... *******www.greenjoyment****/solar-cookers
23 Sep 2008
2487
Share Video

0:51
cut is from the debut album of the #1 US Grime group Os Crunc Tesla Vampirekiller Arc. In this scene, Raedawn teleports from Sao Paulo Brazil to the top of Mount Royal in Montreal and delivers a message to his people. The full length entitled "What's Really Rad? the Gray Plague" is now infesting the globe released by Ekler'o'shock and Luv Technologies in the spring of 2008. - Vocals by Jordie Laforge - Production by Raedawn Directed by Warhologram out for the Dvd Soon. Here goes some hype fiction for the heads out thurrrr! Miss Teen usa aka Miss South Carolina could even understand that the Britney Spears is a Stargate alien from the planet Mars or maybe Venus. (I'm not sure) Lil Wayne and Rhianna also concur that these fellas blur the line of reality through art fatality. Mortal Kombat on you Wombats!!! Finish him for breakfast lunch and dinner to see who the winner is on who wants to me a millionare or even chamillionare. I found a billion google type candies worn by a sexy gal named Mandy. She was totally crazy and loved to listen to Dipset and even Snoop Dogg !She even predicted the dow jones nascar crash while buying hash browns at the potato stock market. Here's my most favorite tale: One day I saw a cute fat kitten run amok. His name was John and he had a lil sister named Mary Ann and an even smaller sister named Suzy. They went to the store to buy a crack rock for Paris Hilton and her boyfriend Oj Simpson. then Johnny Cochran stepped on Suzy and went to court with her dramatic parents. Meanwhile, the boy cat from around the corner who went to the same school where the olsen twins escaped, found some hardcore booty shake records from the 90's. He listened to the classic songs yet new they were disrespectful to women. Ergo the Freak in captivity is none other than the new character Tommy with whom all adore. Tom is a wolf and he likes to eat cats for Breakfast!!! He plays on his playstation and sony psp all day long while watching snowboard videos. Meanwhile the super hot Cat was riding his skateboard while playing Kanye west on his Ipod and then BOOM!!!The Battle Begins!!! the Wolf Jumped in front of him and said give me your rubik's cube and your Jessica Alba lunchbox or I'll call the police and tell them about the alternative avant garde lifestyle that you've been living. WHAT ?! said the cat ( lol ) He looked into his pocket for the proper code to release his dragonball z monster that was hidden in his little kitten pocket. KABOOOM!! A giant 100 foot tall two headed Homer and Bart Simpson behemoth arose from inside his red ball of power. The simpsons were a threat that the wolf never imagined would serve to challenge him in an animal fight. So he called up Daft Punk on his cell phone and told them to bring a metal stripper to destroy these cartoon machines before his eyes as well as vote for Obama or Hillary Clinton! So then, Outta the Blue....a robot parody of a funny novel I once read called the Davinci code came out of nowhere to protect the wolf. Then Marge And Maggie simpson fell from the sky like angels to lay their wrath upon the strong dog. Even Lisa appeared with an Oprah medallion on her side that was glaring with the aura of a Scientology gem that would make Harry Potter jealous. She once won the gold medal at the post human olympic games! The silly wolf made a stupid mistake. He slipped on a banana and fell on his ass so hard that he could no longer walk! The cat side are you alright? are you Hurt?! or in pain?...and the wolf replied " You foolish pussy cat! Daft Punk and Kanye are coming to get you ! ...the cat said " dont make me pull 50 cent out of my pokemon ball too! I'm warning you!" Then a blond fairy appeared and told them all to stop or she would turn them into frogs!!! ( rofl ) Then the magic fairy said "do you want me to give you a sex change operation?! or do y'all want me to delete your myspace pages!!!??" Both animals replied " NO " dont do that Please dont do that! We just want to be Platinum rap stars like on that tmz channel. Can you surgically bond us to Angelina Jolie possibly? the Fairy replied " I want an apology for Michael Jackson. Then Oj appeared with an olympic baseball bat and a basketball jersey screaming " I want a Hershey!" The cat said I'm so thirsty for some milk .***okies would complement that nice. or maybe I just stick with eating mice. So they all went back to Oj's house to watch Full House versus the Family Guy's spouse! and then the whole city got destroyed by a nuclear bomb developed by terrorists funded by your Mom! Sike!! -a short story by Warhologram
3 Aug 2009
3725
Share Video

4:49
On a brutal winter's day in 1650 in Stockholm, the Frenchman René Descartes, the most influential and controversial thinker of his time, was buried after a cold and lonely death far from home. Sixteen years later, the French Ambassador Hugues de Terlon secretly unearthed Descartes' bones and transported them to France. Why would this devoutly Catholic official care so much about the remains of a philosopher who was hounded from country to country on charges of atheism? Why would Descartes' bones take such a strange, serpentine path over the next 350 years—a path intersecting some of the grandest events imaginable: the birth of science, the rise of democracy, the mind-body problem, the conflict between faith and reason? Their story involves people from all walks of life—Louis XIV, a Swedish casino operator, poets and playwrights, philosophers and physicists, as these people used the bones in scientific studies, stole them, sold them, revered them as relics, fought over them, passed them surreptitiously from hand to hand. The answer lies in Descartes’ famous phrase: Cogito ergo sum—"I think, therefore I am." In his deceptively simple seventy-eight-page essay, Discourse on the Method, this small, vain, vindictive, peripatetic, ambitious Frenchman destroyed 2,000 years of received wisdom and laid the foundations of the modern world. At the root of Descartes’ “method” was skepticism: "What can I know for certain?" Like-minded thinkers around Europe passionately embraced the book--the method was applied to medicine, nature, politics, and society. The notion that one could find truth in facts that could be proved, and not in reliance on tradition and the Church's teachings, would become a turning point in human history. In an age of faith, what Descartes was proposing seemed like heresy. Yet Descartes himself was a good Catholic, who was spurred to write his incendiary book for the most personal of reasons: He had devoted himself to medicine and the study of nature, but when his beloved daughter died at the age of five, he took his ideas deeper. To understand the natural world one needed to question everything. Thus the scientific method was created and religion overthrown. If the natural world could be understood, knowledge could be advanced, and others might not suffer as his child did. The great controversy Descartes ignited continues to our era: where Islamic terrorists spurn the modern world and pine for a culture based on unquestioning faith; where scientists write bestsellers that passionately make the case for atheism; where others struggle to find a balance between faith and reason. Descartes’ Bonesis a historical detective story about the creation of the modern mind, with twists and turns leading up to the present day—to the science museum in Paris where the philosopher’s skull now resides and to the church a few kilometers away where, not long ago, a philosopher-priest said a mass for his bones.
8 Oct 2008
207
Share Video

4:47
Apo to ergo "O xamenos ta pairnei ola".
10 Oct 2008
204
Share Video

4:00
Song-Fears in the Water-The Vincent Black Shadow Anime-Ergo Proxy
7 Jan 2009
824
Share Video

3:55
anime manga bleach fma naruto elfen lied death note lain fate stay night h2o genshiken blood onegai twins gto ergo proxy claymore clannad girls bravo oh my goddess
26 Jan 2009
610
Share Video