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Your professional microwave operator is going to be microwaving a Battleship Game for your viewing pleasure today. You are watching HD Wide Screen Episode #Fifty-Three on MetaCafe *Items are microwaved in a professional environment. Please do not attempt. Please feel free to subscribe and comment. Please be advised the XBOX 360/ Kenmore pizza/oven combo contest was specific to My original Youtube Microwaving show and does not apply here
29 May 2009
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9:48
(Psalms 139:14) I praise you because I am fearfully and wonderfully made. And just how fearfully and wonderfully made are we? Well here are a few examples: There are about.... One-hundred-thousand hairs on the average human scalp. There are about.... One-quadrillion "connections" (synapses) between the one-hundred-billion cells (neurons) of an adult brain. The brain's one hundred billion neurons match the number of stars in the Milky Way, and the number of connections active in the brain's functioning verge on the number of stars in the entire known universe. To fill the capacity of all those synapses, a person would have to learn a one-billion volume encyclopedia (a million "letters" per encyclopedia). That’s enough to fill a bookshelf 10,000 miles long. In contrast, the Library of Congress (The largest library in the world) only has 17 million volumes. The brain is the most complex structure in the known universe, far surpassing, by many orders of magnitude, the most advanced supercomputers. One human brain generates more electrical impulses in a single day than all of the world's telephones put together. This is all done with the power equivalent of a single flashlight, 12 Watts. All of our senses (sight, smell, hearing, taste, feeling) are transformed to electrical impulses which are sent to general regions of synapses in the brain where we, after complex transformations, finally become conscious of it. To accomplish all this thinking, the brain uses 20 to 25% of the body’s oxygen and 20% of its blood sugar, even though it is only 2% (3 pounds) of the body’s weight. You don't consume any more calories studying for a test than you do gazing at a cloud. There are about.... Seven-million shades of color the human eye can detect. It takes 200 million billionths of a second for the retina to create vision from light. The eye is so sensitive it can detect a candle one mile away. There is a biological computer in the retina which processes and compresses the information from those millions of light sensitive cells before sending it to the visual cortex where the complex stream of information is then decompressed. While today's digital hardware is extremely impressive, it is clear that the human retina's real-time performance goes unchallenged. To actually simulate 10 milliseconds of the complete processing of even a single nerve cell from the retina would require the solution of about 500 simultaneous nonlinear differential equations 100 times and would take at least several minutes of processing time on a Cray supercomputer. Keeping in mind that there are 10 million or more such cells interacting with each other in complex ways, it would take a minimum of 100 years of Cray time to simulate what takes place in your eye many times every second. The human is the only species known to shed tears when they are sad. The eye is infinitely more complex than any man-made camera. It can handle 1.5 million simultaneous messages, and gathers 80% of all the knowledge absorbed by the brain. The retina covers less than a square inch, and contains 137 million light-sensitive receptor cells, 130 million rods (allowing the eye to see in black and white), and 7 million cones (allowing the eye to see in full color). The rod can detect a single photon. For visible light the energy carried by a single photon would be around a tiny 4 x 10-19 Joules; this energy is just sufficient to excite a single molecule in a photoreceptor cell of an eye. In an average day, the eye moves about 100,000 times, using muscles that, milligram for milligram, are among the body’s strongest. The body would have to walk 50 miles to exercise the leg muscles an equal amount. The eye is self-cleaning. Lacrimal glands produce secretions (e.g., tears) to flush away dust and other foreign materials. Eyelids act as windshield washers. The blinking process (3-6 times a minute) keeps the sensitive cornea moist and clean. And, tears contain a potent microbe-killer (lysozyme) which guards the eyes against bacterial infection. During times of stress, one eye will “rest” while the other does 90% of the work; then the process is reversed, allowing both eyes equal amounts of rest. The brain receives millions of simultaneous reports from the eyes. When its designated wavelength of light is present, each rod or cone triggers an electrical response to the brain, which then absorbs a composite set of yes-or-no messages from all the rods and cones. There are about.... Ten-trillion levels of intensity to human hearing (from threshold to pain, 0 to 130 decibels). This makes the sense of hearing the widest ranging of all senses. The ear is capable of detecting pressure variations of less than two-ten-thosanths-of-a-millionth of barometric pressure. This moves the ear drum about one-hundreth-millionth of an inch. This threshold of hearing corresponds to a vibration width of only one-hundreth of an hydrogen atom’s diameter. (Hydrogen is the smallest atom.) There are about.... Ten-thousand different odors the average person is able to detect. Our noses are so sensitive we can detect the odors of certain substances even when they are diluted to 1 part in 30 billion and are so keen we can tell which direction a odor is coming from. Each person gives off a distinctive scent signature (like a fingerprint). There are about.... Two and a half-billion beats from the heart once a person reaches seventy. The heart will pump forty-eight-million gallons of blood by then and could fill 2000 railroad tanker cars stretching over 20 miles. In one hour the heart works hard enough to raise a one ton weight one yard from the ground. The heart is so strong that it could shoot a stream of blood over 30 feet. There are over sixty-thousand miles of blood vessels in the average person. That's enough to go around the world two and a half times, if they were stretched out end to end! A blood cell will make one circuit, from the heart through the major organs and part of the blood system, and back, in an average of one minute. Over 2 million red blood cells are made every second, if all of a person’s red blood cells were laid out side by side it would stretch over 100 thousand miles. That’s over 4 times around the equator of the earth. There are about.... One-hundred-thousand pounds of food and fourteen-thousand gallons of liquid consumed by the average person in their lifetime. There are about.... Five-hundred different functions of the liver, some of which include: metabolizing food into nutrients; detoxifying poisons; purifying the blood; manufacturing blood clotting agents and blood proteins; manufacturing and storing hormones; and maintaining body fat levels such as cholesterol and triglycerides. The liver is so resilient it can grow back to normal size in three months, even if only twenty percent of the liver remains. There are about..... One-hundred trillion cells in the average person. Each cell has over a million unique structures and processes (a complexity comparable to a large city ). Each cell consists of "artificial languages and their decoding systems, memory banks for information storage and retrieval, elegant control systems regulating the automated assembly of parts and components, error fail-safe and proof-reading devices utilized for quality control, assembly processes involving the principle of prefabrication and modular construction and a capacity not equaled in any of our most advanced machines, for one of our most advanced machines would have to be capable of self-replicating its entire structure within a matter of a few hours. Every one of those trillions of cells (except for the brain cells) is regenerated and replaced on average of every seven years! Each cell has about ten-thousand times as many molecules as our Milky Way galaxy has stars. Skin is completely renewed every twenty-seven days and the skeleton is completely renewed every three months. There are about.... Six feet of DNA packed in the nucleus of each cell, which is only 1.4-millionths of a meter wide. If you could stretch lengthwise all the DNA in just one human, you could go 125 billion miles (from the Sun to Pluto and back fifteen times)! If the string of DNA were about a yard thick, the machinery that copies the DNA would be about the size of a FedEx delivery truck. Unlike a truck, however, this machinery would travel along the "string" at 375 miles per hour, copying the DNA into another string. The data compression of the DNA is up to 12 codes thick. There are about.... Three-billion letters of code on that six feet of DNA. The DNA contains the “complete parts list” of the trillions upon trillions of proteins that are in your body, plus, it contains the blueprint of how all these countless trillions of proteins go together, plus it contains the self-assembly instructions that somehow tells all these countless proteins how to put themselves together in the proper way. According to Bill Gates, the DNA code is written in some type of super-code that is far, far more advanced than any computer program ever written by man. If you were to write out that super-code, you could fill a three-thousand volume encyclopedia (a million letters per encyclopedia) ! If you were to read the code aloud, at a rate of three letters per second for twenty-four hours per day (about one-hundred-million letters a year), it would take you over thirty years to read it. The capacity of a DNA molecule to store information is so efficient that all the information needed to specify an organism as complex as man weighs less than a few thousand-millionths of a gram. The information needed to specify the design of all species of organisms that have ever existed (a number estimated to be one billion) could easily fit into a teaspoon with plenty of room left over for every book ever written on the face of earth. For comparison sake, if mere man were to write out the proper locations of all those proteins in just one human body, in the limited mathematical language he now uses, it would take a bundle of CD-ROM disks greater than the size of the moon, or a billion-trillion computer hard drives, and that’s just the proper locations for the protein molecules in one human body, that billion-trillion computer hard-drives would not contain a single word of instruction telling those protein molecules how to self assemble themselves. There are about.... Twenty-five-million spools on which the six feet of DNA is wound so as to keep it from becoming tangled . At thousands of different sites the DNA is constantly being wound or unwound to reveal the proper code to the cell's transcription mechanisms. On top of this engineering nightmare, each time a new cell is required, a copy of the DNA must be made and then split apart from the old DNA! There are about.... One-hundred-and-fifty-three-thousand different types or classes of proteins in the human body. An individual protein is so small that we would have to magnify it a million times to be able to see it with our eyes. Each protein is made of a complex sequence of the twenty different L-amino acids which are the basic building blocks of all life forms on earth. How complex? Let us consider insulin, one of the simplest proteins. It has fifty-one possible locations for an L-amino acid to occupy. If we theoretically try every possible combination of putting the twenty different L-amino acids in the fifty-one places possible, and we filled a basket (large) with just one electron from all the combinations, the basket would weigh one-hundred billion times the weight of the earth!! More amazing yet.... The possibilities of making a specific one-hundred L-amino acid sequence into a desired protein by pure chance are even more astronomical, EVEN IF every atomic particle in the entire universe were dedicated to being L-amino acids. A universe full of L-amino acids trying totally new and unique combinations for groups of one-hundred, at the rate of a trillion times a second for thirty billion years, would have only a one in a trillion, trillion possibility of having made a specific one-hundred L-amino acid protein during that thirty billion years. In other words, only one trillion, trillionth of all the total combinations possible for a simple one-hundred L-amino acid protein would have been made during that thirty billion years!! The simplest life form on earth requires millions of proteins molecules which are divided into hundreds of different and distinctly shaped types. When considering the interwoven complexity required for these millions of precisely shaped protein molecules, it becomes apparent life originating by natural means is clearly impossible. Actually.... The previously stated odds are much worse than I've shown for the one-hundred L-amino acid protein. It is not enough for the L-amino acids to be in the same place at the same time. Many times, L-amino acids must be held and kept from folding on to each other while they are being assembled in to the correct sequence for the final protein. When they are finally correctly sequenced, the L-amino acids are released from their hold and guided by other proteins into folding into the final precisely correct 3 dimensional protein shape! It would take the most powerful super-computer in the world an entire year just to figure out how one "simple" one-hundred L-amino acid protein will look in its final 3-dimensional form once it has been released from its hold. Yet the protein accomplishes its final shape in a fraction of a second! As well... Biophysicist Hubert Yockey determined that natural selection would have to explore 1.40 x 10^70 different genetic codes to discover the optimal universal genetic code that is found in nature. The maximum amount of time available for it to originate is 6.3 x 10^15 seconds. Natural selection would have to evaluate roughly 10^55 codes per second to find the one that is optimal. Put simply, natural selection lacks the time necessary to find the optimal universal genetic code we find in nature. (Gitt, In The Beginning was Information; Rana, The Cells design page 177) Note: Your bone is stronger than granite. A block of bone half the size of a computer mouse can support 10 tons - 4 times the capacity of concrete. more recent notes: The average number of cells in the human body is between 75 and 100 trillion cells. 300 million cells in the human body die and are replaced (most of them) every minute. If all the DNA was removed from a single cell in a person's body and laid end to end, it would be six feet long. If the DNA was removed from all of the cells in a person's body and laid end to end, it would stretch from Earth to the sun and back 450 times, or about 135 billion kilometers. The human genome, according to Bill Gates the founder of Microsoft, far, far surpasses, in complexity, any computer program ever written by man. The data compression (multiple meanings) of some stretches of human DNA is estimated to be up to 12 codes thick! (Trifonov, 1989) No line of computer code ever written by man approaches that level of data compression (poly-functional complexity). There are about three-billion letters of code on the six feet of DNA curled up in each human cell. The amount of information in human DNA is roughly equivalent to 12 sets of The Encyclopaedia Britannica—an incredible 384 volumes worth of detailed information that would fill 48 feet of library shelves! If you were to read the code aloud, at a rate of three letters per second for twenty-four hours per day (about one-hundred-million letters a year), it would take you over thirty years to read it. The capacity of a DNA molecule to store information is so efficient all the information needed to specify an organism as complex as man weighs less than a few thousand-millionths of a gram. The information needed to specify the design of all species of organisms which have ever existed (a number estimated to be one billion) could easily fit into a teaspoon with plenty of room left over for every book ever written on the face of the earth. For comparison sake, if mere man were to try to 'quantum teleport' just one human body (change a physical human body into "pure information" and then 'teleport' it to another physical location) it would take at least 10^32 bits just to decode the teleportation event, or a cube of CD-ROM disks 1000 kilometers on 1 side, and would take over one hundred million centuries to transmit all that information for just one human body even with the best optical fibers conceivable! A fun talk on teleportation - Professor Samuel Braunstein http://www.research.ibm.com/quantuminfo/teleportation/braunstein.html On top of that the entire digital output of the entire world is only 10^21 bytes or 10^22 bits and Werner Gitt observes that the storage capacity of just “1 cubic cm of DNA is 10^21 bits. (DNA – deoxyribonucleaic acid.)” http://www.uncommondescent.com/intelligent-design/zetabytes-by-chance-or-design/ Intelligent Design - The Anthropic Hypothesis http://lettherebelight-77.blogspot.com/2009/10/intelligent-design-anthropic-hypothesis_19.html
19 Oct 2010
3053
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53:51
Because I got many messages and comments asking when a song is played in the video (of course during the clips where i DIDNT put the name in it), I'll answer it finally in chronological order! 1) Nostradamus by the company Atmosphere Music 2) Streets of Bombay by the company Amphibious Zoo music 4) song played during the PotCIV Trailer is 'Hans enz fallen' by Beyond music 5) epic football/rugby/whatever match has the song 'Unstoppable' by ES POSTHUMUS 6) umm...next clip has something by xray dog music I forgot the name (actually im to lazy to check it..but if someone is really intersted in...ask me. or someother guys. ) I know this mix is crap, I will deactivate the vote-function when 100 dislikes are reached, because ... I don't know why, I'll just do it. I am in the preparation for Epic Music Mix - Reloaded. Better tracks, better transitions, and real HD. Btw, I was the very first guy who uploaded a trailer music mix with such a length. I love copies, but don't let them fool you. Thank you.
7 Jun 2012
5037
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2:56
Before you start complaning about the quality: IF YOU GET THE VIEWS ON THIS ONE TO 1,000,000 VIEWS I'M UPLOADING GOOD QUALITY VIDEOS OF EVERYTHING SO VIEW IT! I've been seeing alot of people who want the original, so here it is. The 'Prince Ali' song, sung by Robin Williams (genie). Lyrics: Make way for Prince Ali Say hey! It's Prince Ali Hey! Clear the way in the old Bazaar Hey you! Let us through! It's a bright new star! Oh Come! Be the first on your block to meet his eye! Make way! Here he comes! Ring bells! Bang the drums! Are you gonna love this guy! Prince Ali! Fabulous he! Ali Ababwa Genuflect, show some respect Down on one knee! Now, try your best to stay calm Brush up your sunday salaam The come and meet his spectacular coterie Prince Ali! Mighty is he! Ali Ababwa Strong as ten regular men, definitely! He faced the galloping hordes A hundred bad guys with swords Who sent those goons to their lords? Why, Prince Ali He's got seventy-five golden camels Purple peacocks He's got fifty-three When it comes to exotic-type mammals Has he got a zoo? I'm telling you, it's a world-class menagerie Prince Ali! Handsome is he, Ali Ababwa That physique! How can I speak Weak at the knee Well, get on out in that square Adjust your veil and prepare To gawk and grovel and stare at Prince Ali! There's no question this Ali's alluring Never ordinary, never boring Everything about the man just plain impresses He's a winner, he's a whiz, a wonder! He's about to pull my heart asunder! And I absolutely love the way he dresses! He's got ninety-five white Persian monkeys (He's got the monkeys, let's see the monkeys) And to view them he charges no fee (He's generous, so generous) He's got slaves, he's got servants and flunkies (Proud to work for him) They bow to his whim love serving him They're just lousy with loyalty to Ali! Prince Ali! Prince Ali! Amorous he! Ali Ababwa Heard your princess was a sight lovely to see And that, good people, is why he got dolled up and dropped by With sixty elephants, llamas galore With his bears and lions A brass band and more With his forty fakirs, his cooks, his bakers His birds that warble on key Make way for prince Ali!
8 Jan 2009
12074
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3:20
Take big names like The Matrix's Wachowski Brothers, Babylon 5 writer J. Michael Strazynski, and martial-arts movie legend Sho Kosugi and what do you get? You get Ninja Assassin, a truly out of nowhere ninja action movie. When a young ninja named Raizo breaks free of the control the Ozunu Clan held over him following the execution of his best friend, he thinks he's put those days behind him and can now function as one of the best assassins in the world. But it's never that easy--after saving a Europol agent from Ozunu's assassins, Raizo finds himself on ground zero right alongside the Europol detective. The two lead the Ozunu on a merry chase through most of Europe, but will they survive? Will they take down the Ozunu clan? Check out the trailer. Would you believe me if I told you that Strazynski wrote the script for this in just fifty-three hours? Well, okay, he wrote the REWRITTEN script in that time, but it does beg the question: does it show? Or are you going to be all over this one when it comes out this November? Slip undetected into the comments section below and leave only the razor edge of your opinion behind. Thanks for watching! Ninja Assassin Cast: Rain, Naomie Harris, Ben Miles, Sho Kosugi, Rick Yune Ninja Assassin movie trailer provided by Warner Bros. Pictures. Ninja Assassin opens in US theaters November 25, 2009. Ninja Assassin is directed by James McTeique.
13 Oct 2009
1428
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4:09
They come from every state to find Some dreams were meant to be declined Tell the man what did you have in mind What have you come to do No turning water into wine No learning while you're in the line I'll take you to the broken sign You see these lights are blue Come and get it Lost it at the city limit Say goodbye 'Cause they will find a way to trim it Everybody Lookin' for a silly gimmick Gotta get away Can't take it for another minute This town is made of many things Just look at what the current brings So high it's only promising This place was made on you Tell me baby what's your story Where you come from And where you wanna go this time oh Tell me lover are you lonely The thing we need is Never all that hard to find oh Tell me baby what's your story Where do you come from And where you wanna go this time oh You're so lovely are you lonely Giving up on the innocence you left behind Some claim to have the fortitude Too shrewd to blow the interlude Sustaining pain to set a mood Step out to be renewed I'll move you like a baritone Jungle Brothers on the microphone Getting over with an undertone It's time to turn to stone Chitty chitty baby When your nose is in the nitty gritty Life could be a little sweet But life could be a little shitty What a pity Boston and a Kansas city Looking for a hundred But you only ever found a fifty Three fingers in the honeycomb You ring just like a xylophone Devoted to the chromosome The day that you left home Tell me baby what's your story Where you come from And where you wanna go this time oh Tell me lover are you lonely The thing we need is Never all that hard to find oh Tell me baby what's your story Where do you come from And where you wanna go this time oh You're so lovely are you lonely Giving up on the innocence you left behind Tell me baby what's your story Where you come from And where you wanna go this time oh Tell me lover are you lonely The thing we need is Never all that far to find oh Tell me baby what's your story Where do you come from And where you wanna go this time oh You're so lovely are you lonely Giving up on the innocence you left behind
15 Jan 2011
7650
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1:46
The clip scare boy from Fahrenheit 451 (1966) with Bee Duffell Okay. Nine thirteens are a hundred and seventeen. Nine fourteens are a hundred and twenty-six. Nine fifteens are a hundred and thirty-five. Nine sixteens are a hundred and forty-four. Nine seventeens are a hundred and fifty-three. That's Robert. Nine eighteens are a hundred and sixty-two. Nine nineteens are a hundred and seventy-one. Robert. Nine thirteens are a hundred and seventeen. It may be my uniform. Yes, yes, that's what frightened him! It must have been your uniform. Go ahead. I'll wait here. Nine fifteens are a hundred and thirty-five. All right. Nine sixteens are a hundred and forty-four. Nine seventeens are a hundred and fifty-three. Nine eighteens are a hundred and sixty-three.
26 Oct 2011
507
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2:00
The clip first night in sandford from Hot Fuzz (2007) with Simon Pegg, Tom Strode Walton Pint of lager, please, Mary. Right you are, my love. Yes, sir, what can I get you? Could I have a glass of the cranberry juice, please? Certainly. Now, you wouldn't, by any chance, be the new policeman? Police officer, yes. I'm Nicholas Angel. I'm Roy Porter. This is my wife Mary. Mary. Welcome to Sandford. If there's anything you need, just let us know. Thank you. Could I borrow your newspaper? It's not ours, love. We're not big fans of the local fish wrapper, are we, Mare? They listed her age as 55. When I'm actually 53. Fifty-three. Pint of lager, please, Mary. Right you are, my love. Excuse me. What? When's your birthday? Twenty-second of February. What year? Every year. Get out. When's your birthday? Eighth of May, 1969. You're 37? Yeah. Get out. When's your birthday? Out. Is there a problem, Officer? Yes, there is, Mr. Porter. It would appear a number of your patrons are under age.
26 Oct 2011
4847
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0:36
The clip Kama'aina price from Blue Crush (2002) Seventeen fifty-three. That's kama'aina price? No kama'aina for candy. Ohh. Come on, Leilani, it's breakfast. Yeah. Breakfast? Right. Sorry, girls. $17.53. This has corn syrup in it. It's a vegetable. It's nutritional. No. It has sugar. It turns into fat. And fat comes out like me. Okay? So, $17.53. All right, I've got five. How much do you have? I got some cash. Hold on, I got, like... What is this? I don't know, like 70, 60... That's pathetic. What is that? I didn't say I had a lot. I said I had some.
14 Nov 2011
9809
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2:00
The clip not enough money from Midnight Run (1988) with Charles Grodin, Robert De Niro How much money do we have left? That's it? That's it. We're starvin', and you're buying cigarettes? I need these cigarettes. You have your whatever you're gonna have. I'll have this. What can I do for you boys? Coffee, please. How much is the coffee? It's 53 cents. How much is tea? Fifty-three cents. I'll have tea. Okay, and our breakfast special today is chorizo and eggs. Chorizo and eggs? Chorizo and eggs. Yes. What is that? It's a Mexican sausage... mixed in with scrambled eggs, and it comes with hash browns and toast. Won't be havin' that. Thank you. What time you got? It's ten to 9:00. In ten minutes, we'll be at the Western Union office, we'll have 500 bucks. I'll buy ya a juicy steak or what ever you want, okay? Chorizo and eggs? Chorizo and eggs? I'll get you whatever you want. You know, Jon, you're in this mess because you're in this mess. I didn't put you in this mess. Do you understand? If you had left Jimmy Serrano alone, this wouldn't be happening. Thank you. I had a way out of this, you know. Oh, yeah? What's the thing Serrano's most afraid of? Goin' cross-country with you.
27 Nov 2011
343
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1:03
The clip the conspiracy revealed Part 3 from Hot Fuzz (2007) with Simon Pegg, Timothy Dalton And, and George Merchant? He had an awful house. Awful. We begged him in vain to make his residence more in keeping with the village's rustic esthetic. And what about Tim Messenger? What was his crime? Tim Messenger's tenure as editor of the Sandford Citizen has been unbearable. Our once great paper had become riddled with tabloid journalism. Not to mention persistent errors. He listed her age as 55. When, actually, I'm 53. Fifty-three. What, what about Leslie Tiller? One of your own? Her horticultural expertise helped put Sandford on the map. Oh, she was ever so good. Cousin Leslie was a terrible shame. But it seemed she was set on moving away. We couldn't have her sharing her green fingers with anybody else. Not least those heathens at Buford Abbey. If we can't have her, no one can. How can this be for the greater good? The greater good. Shut it! These people died for no reason. No reason whatsoever! Oh, I wouldn't say that. Hello, Nicholas. I was like you once.
6 Dec 2011
343
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1:02
The clip The local pub from Hot Fuzz (2007) with Simon Pegg. Powered by: Anyclip. any moment from any film. Pint of lager, please, Mary. Right you are, my love. Yes, sir, what can I get you? Could I have a glass of the cranberry juice, please? Certainly. Now, you wouldn't, by any chance, be the new policeman? Police officer, yes. I'm Nicholas Angel. I'm Roy Porter. This is my wife Mary. Mary. Welcome to Sandford. If there's anything you need, just let us know. Thank you. Could I borrow your newspaper? It's not ours, love. We're not big fans of the local fish wrapper, are we, Mare? They listed her age as 55. When I'm actually 53. Fifty-three. Pint of lager, please, Mary. Right you are, my love.
23 Mar 2012
2312
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2:00
The clip The greater good from Hot Fuzz (2007) with Timothy Dalton, Simon Pegg. Powered by: Anyclip. any moment from any film. My, he is tenacious, isn't he? I'm arresting you under suspicion of conspiracy to commit murder. Oh, come, come, Sergeant. You should be ashamed. Calling yourself a community that cares. Oh, but we do care, Nicholas. It's all about the greater good. The greater good. How can this be for the greater good? The greater good. You see, as much as I enjoyed your wild theories, Sergeant, the truth is far less complex. Blower's fate was simply the result of his being an appalling actor. Quite appalling. You murdered him for that? Well, he murdered Bill Shakespeare. What? The Dramatic Society is an important feather in our cap. Couldn't let Blower jeopardize that. Not when we had two semi-professionals waiting in the wings. Let's not forget that Greg was an extra in Straw Dogs. And Sheree played a cadaver in Prime Suspect. Yes, I know! Martin was less concerned with the reputation of the village than he was with his sordid affair with Eve Draper. And so Eve deserved to die too? Well, she did have a very annoying laugh. Annoying. And, and George Merchant? He had an awful house. Awful. We begged him in vain to make his residence more in keeping with the village's rustic esthetic. And what about Tim Messenger? What was his crime? Tim Messenger's tenure as editor of the Sandford Citizen has been unbearable. Our once great paper had become riddled with tabloid journalism. Not to mention persistent errors. He listed her age as 55. When, actually, I'm 53. Fifty-three. What, what about Leslie Tiller? One of your own? Her horticultural expertise helped put Sandford on the map. Oh, she was ever so good. Cousin Leslie was a terrible shame. But it seemed she was set on moving away. We couldn't have her sharing her green fingers with anybody else. Not least those heathens at Buford Abbey. If we can't have her, no one can. How can this be for the greater good? The greater good. Shut it! These people died for no reason. No reason whatsoever!
24 Mar 2012
2402
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1:07
The clip Not enough money from Midnight Run (1988) with Charles Grodin, Robert De Niro. Powered by: Anyclip. any moment from any film. How much money do we have left? That's it? That's it. We're starvin', and you're buying cigarettes? I need these cigarettes. You have your whatever you're gonna have. I'll have this. What can I do for you boys? Coffee, please. How much is the coffee? It's 53 cents. How much is tea? Fifty-three cents. I'll have tea. Okay, and our breakfast special today is chorizo and eggs. Chorizo and eggs? Chorizo and eggs. Yes. What is that? It's a Mexican sausage... mixed in with scrambled eggs, and it comes with hash browns and toast. Won't be havin' that. Thank you.
8 Jun 2012
704
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3:27
Toby Keith - Beers Ago Get The Ringtone Here: ---►► http://RingtoneHaven.com/Country ◄◄--- **LEGAL DISCLAIMER** This video is for the educational purpose of singing practice termed under "fair use". Viewers are authorized to watch the video "Beers Ago (Lyrics)" only for the purpose of singing practice and learning the lyrics of the song. I DO NOT OWN THIS SONG, And There Is No Copyright Infringement Intended. All rights belong to Toby Keith and his Record Label Company. **Lyrics** I had a hand me down ride painted rattle can red Second hand tires with poor boy tread Made a lot of almost love in the bed of that Truck that got stuck a lot Just letter jacket boys singing Jerry Jeff songs Drinking everything we could get our hands on Learning 'bout right by doin' it wrong Hopin' we didn't get caught And we spent what little bit of money we had On wintergreen Skoal and main street gas Go get your girl, go make the drag If you're lucky you can take her cross the rail road tracks Where the man in the moon works his magic On the second runner up of the 4H pageant Seems like yesterday, even though That was fourteen hundred and fifty two beers ago Skipped that town on my birthday For eighteen years I was headed that way Where old red stopped I just stayed In a room without a view I met a one look girl in a two bit bar I had a place, she had a car I won her heart with my guitar I sang her the homesick blues 'bout Spendin' what little bit of money we had On wintergreen Skoal and main street gas Go get your girl, go make the drag If you're lucky you can take her cross the railroad tracks Where the man in the moon works his magic On the second runner up of the 4H pageant It seems like yesterday, even though That was fifteen hundred and sixty two beers ago Spendin' what little bit of money we had On wintergreen Skoal and main street gas And go get your girl and go make the drag If you're lucky you can take her cross the railroad tracks Where the man in the moon works his magic On the second runner up of the 4H pageant It seems like yesterday, even though That was sixteen hundred and fifty two beers A whole lot of highway, a whole lot of years Sixteen hundred and fifty three beers ago
27 Oct 2012
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A mafia Don has been gunned down by a hitman outside a bar in Naples. Police think Mario Bachio Terrachino was killed as part of a drugs feud with rival mafia gangs. The fifty-three-year-old was famed for breaking into buildings from sewers - and was wanted for robbery and kidnap. There have been over thirty unsolved Mafia murders in Naples this year.
20 Nov 2012
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