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3:20
My final video of me playing the magnificent Compton organ at the Guildhall, Southampton. One of the things I like about Compton organs is there interesting and unique devices which you do not find on other instruments. One such example is the 'melotone' unit - an early electronic device which was later developed into a complete electronic organ. Im playing the tune 'In the gloaming' and the distinctive sound of the melotone can be heard in the first part of the first verse blending in and again in the last verse but this time making use of its louder solo voices. The Guildhall Compton also has a most beautiful 'Harmonic Flute' rank so in the second half of the first verse I use this by itself to show its beauty. For a full specification of the 'variety console' please click this link: *******www.npor*******/cgi-bin/Rsearch.cgi?Fn=Rsearch&rec_index=N18285 To find out what a Compton 'melotone' unit is and how it works, click this link: *******www.zyworld****/IvorBuckingham/Melotone.htm At this point, I would like to share a poem written by a lady from Cumbria by the name of Norma Singleton and its called 'Ode to the Redundant Church Organ': ODE TO THE REDUNDANT CHURCH ORGAN They stand rejected, but still proud - a relic of the past Silent now, but full, for some, of memories that will last They make no noise, but in their day, there was such a grandeur then, Music to transport to heaven, to lift the hearts of men. Norma Singleton NOTE: this is purely my interest in order to make sure that these fine organs are archived forever and I do not make any monetary profit by this video being on metacafe. For more information on the John Compton Organ Company Ltd and to see me play other Compton organs, please click on the following link for my site dedicated to the John Compton Organ Company Ltd: *******comptonorgans.yolasite****/
22 Jan 2012
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8:55
More questions, more answers! Today, we crack out questions from Twitter and suggest a great new short film!
14 Nov 2012
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2:30
John Neville reads John Keats's La Belle Dame Sans Merci La Belle Dame Sans Merci by John Keats (1795-1821) I Oh what can ail thee, knight-at-arms, Alone and palely loitering? The sedge has withered from the lake, And no birds sing. II Oh what can ail thee, knight-at-arms, So haggard and so woe-begone? The squirrel's granary is full, And the harvest's done. III I see a lily on thy brow, With anguish moist and fever-dew, And on thy cheeks a fading rose Fast withereth too. IV I met a lady in the meads, Full beautiful - a faery's child, Her hair was long, her foot was light, And her eyes were wild. V I made a garland for her head, And bracelets too, and fragrant zone; She looked at me as she did love, And made sweet moan. VI I set her on my pacing steed, And nothing else saw all day long, For sidelong would she bend, and sing A faery's song. VII She found me roots of relish sweet, And honey wild, and manna-dew, And sure in language strange she said - 'I love thee true'. VIII She took me to her elfin grot, And there she wept and sighed full sore, And there I shut her wild wild eyes With kisses four. IX And there she lullèd me asleep And there I dreamed - Ah! woe betide! - The latest dream I ever dreamt On the cold hill side. X I saw pale kings and princes too, Pale warriors, death-pale were they all; They cried - 'La Belle Dame sans Merci Hath thee in thrall!' XI I saw their starved lips in the gloam, With horrid warning gaped wide, And I awoke and found me here, On the cold hill's side. XII And this is why I sojourn here Alone and palely loitering, Though the sedge is withered from the lake, And no birds sing.
24 Sep 2011
148
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2:33
John Keats - La Belle Dame Sans Merci - Soundtrack from the film Bright Star 2009 - Starring Ben Whishaw and Abbie Cornish. La Belle Dame Sans Merci by John Keats (1795-1821) I Oh what can ail thee, knight-at-arms, Alone and palely loitering? The sedge has withered from the lake, And no birds sing. II Oh what can ail thee, knight-at-arms, So haggard and so woe-begone? The squirrel's granary is full, And the harvest's done. III I see a lily on thy brow, With anguish moist and fever-dew, And on thy cheeks a fading rose Fast withereth too. IV I met a lady in the meads, Full beautiful - a faery's child, Her hair was long, her foot was light, And her eyes were wild. V I made a garland for her head, And bracelets too, and fragrant zone; She looked at me as she did love, And made sweet moan. VI I set her on my pacing steed, And nothing else saw all day long, For sidelong would she bend, and sing A faery's song. VII She found me roots of relish sweet, And honey wild, and manna-dew, And sure in language strange she said - 'I love thee true'. VIII She took me to her elfin grot, And there she wept and sighed full sore, And there I shut her wild wild eyes With kisses four. IX And there she lullèd me asleep And there I dreamed - Ah! woe betide! - The latest dream I ever dreamt On the cold hill side. X I saw pale kings and princes too, Pale warriors, death-pale were they all; They cried - 'La Belle Dame sans Merci Hath thee in thrall!' XI I saw their starved lips in the gloam, With horrid warning gaped wide, And I awoke and found me here, On the cold hill's side. XII And this is why I sojourn here Alone and palely loitering, Though the sedge is withered from the lake, And no birds sing.
24 Sep 2011
563
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