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21:21
For centuries, lead toxicity has been one of the most significant preventable causes of neurologic morbidity from an environmental toxin. A heavy metal, lead is ubiquitous in our environment but has no physiologic role in biological systems. Lead toxicity is a particularly insidious hazard with the potential of causing irreversible health effects. It interferes with a number of body functions primarily affecting the central nervous, hematopoietic, hepatic and renal system producing serious disorders. Acute toxicity is related to occupational exposure and is quite uncommon. Chronic toxicity on the other hand is much more common. Research on the effects of lead on adults has prompted the suggestion that acceptable levels of lead in adults be dropped almost to those of children. The ongoing emphasis on abatement of lead environments places added emphasis on occupational exposure to lead (eg, among workers at smelters or battery recycling plants). Such exposure is a continuing problem. Whereas occupational exposure remains an occasional concern, the greatest public health issue related to lead at present is exposure of young children to decaying fragments of leaded paint. Pediatric lead poisoning Compared with adult lead poisoning, pediatric lead poisoning is a somewhat newer problem. First reported in the late 1800s in Australia, interest in childhood lead poisoning and its manifold clinical presentations has burgeoned. It should be noted that toxic metals, including lead, can be transmitted from a mother to her child via breast milk. Lead poisoning is probably the most important chronic environmental illness affecting modern children. Despite efforts to control it and despite apparent success in decreasing incidence, serious cases of lead poisoning still appear in hospital emergency departments (EDs), clinics, and private physicians’ offices.
21 Aug 2017
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1:03
Largest Plastic Bags Manufacturer In UAE. Our extensive products range includes shopping bags, garbage bags, poly bags, biodegradable bags, bio hazard bags, furniture covers etc.
4 Sep 2017
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21:20
All pesticides have some level of toxicity, and pose some risk to infants and children. The risk depends on the toxicity of the pesticide ingredients and how much of the pesticide a child is exposed to. Infants and children are more sensitive to the toxic effects of pesticides than adults. An infant's brain, nervous system, and organs are still developing after birth. When exposed, a baby's immature liver and kidneys cannot remove pesticides from the body as well as an adult's liver and kidneys. Infants may also be exposed to more pesticide than adults because they take more breaths per minute and have more skin surface relative to their body weight. Children often spend more time closer to the ground, touching baseboards and lawns where pesticides may have been applied. Children often eat and drink more relative to their body weight than adults, which can lead to a higher dose of pesticide residue per pound of body weight. Babies that crawl on treated carpeting may have a greater potential to dislodge pesticide residue onto their skin or breathe in pesticide-laden dust. Young children are also more likely to put their fingers, toys, and other objects into their mouths. Because of this, it is important to minimize your child's exposure to pesticides. One way to minimize exposure to pesticides is to take an approach called Integrated Pest Management (IPM). IPM is a pest control strategy that uses a combination of methods to prevent and eliminate pests in the most effective and least hazardous manner.
9 Sep 2017
20
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21:21
These are especially hazardous household items. Buy small quantities. Discard unneeded extras. Make sure they are always out of a child's reach. Medicines: these are OK in the right amount for the right person. They can be dangerous for children who take the wrong medicine or swallow too much. Carbon monoxide: This gas is in fact an invisible killer. Take it seriously. Make sure there's a carbon monoxide alarm in every sleeping area of your home. Button batteries: Be especially mindful of the 20 mm lithium coin cell. When swallowed by children, especially those younger than 4 years, it often lodges in the esophagus causing burns within just 2 hours. A hole in the esophagus may develop and the burn can extend into the trachea or aorta. More than 40 children have died from swallowing button batteries. Iron pills: adult-strength iron pills are very dangerous for children to swallow. Children can start throwing up blood or having bloody diarrhea in less than an hour. Cleaning products that cause chemical burns: these can be just as bad as burns from fire. Products that cause chemical burns include include drain openers, toilet bowl cleaners, rust removers, and oven cleaners. Nail glue remover and nail primer: some products used for artificial nails can be poisonous in surprising ways. Some nail glue removers have caused cyanide poisoning when swallowed by children. Some nail primers have caused burns to the skin and mouth of children who tried to drink them. Hydrocarbons: this is a broad category that includes gasoline, kerosene, lamp oil, motor oil, lighter fluid, furniture polish, and paint thinner. These liquids are easy to choke on if someone tries to swallow them. If that happens, they can go down the wrong way, into the lungs instead of the stomach. If they get into someone’s lungs, they make it hard to breathe. They can also cause lung inflammation (like pneumonia). Hydrocarbons are among the leading causes of poisoning death in children.
12 Sep 2017
18
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0:28
The government is committed to reducing the numbers killed and seriously injured on Britain's roads by 40 per cent by 2010. The hazard perception element was introduced into the driving test in November 2002 as one of the measures that should help achieve this target by encouraging appropriate training in scanning the road, recognising at the first opportunity from the clues that a potentially dangerous situation might arise and adopting a driving plan to reduce the risk. During the development of this test, the Driving Standards Agency (DSA) worked closely with colleagues from the Transport Research Laboratory (TRL) and the road safety division of the Department for Transport, both of whom thought this test suitable for testing the hazard awareness skills of all drivers. How the test works The hazard perception part is delivered on a computer and you respond by clicking a button on the mouse. You will be presented with a series of 14 video clips which feature every day road scenes, in each clip there will be at least one developing hazard, but one of the clips will feature two developing hazards. To achieve a high score you will need to respond to the developing hazard during the early part of its development. The maximum you can score on each hazard is five. Recognition of available clues and perception of danger are skills that are necessary in all drivers and riders, irrespective of the vehicle used. For this reason, the same version of the hazard perception test is used for all categories of test. An example of when to respond As an example, of how to identify and respond to a developing hazard, consider a parked vehicle on the side of the road. When you first see it, it is not doing anything; it is just a parked vehicle. If you were to respond to the vehicle at this point, you would not score any marks, but you would not lose any marks. However, when you get closer to the vehicle, you notice that the car's right hand indicator starts to flash. The indicator would lead you to believe that the driver of the vehicle has an intention of moving away, therefore the hazard is now developing and a response at this point would score marks. The indicator coming on is a sign that the parked vehicle has changed its status from a potential hazard into a developing hazard. When you get closer to the vehicle, you will probably see the vehicle start to move away from the side of the road; another response should be made at this point. Different clips in the test will have various signs to indicate that the hazard is changing its status and is now starting to develop. How hazard perception test is scored The maximum you can score for each developing hazard is five points. If you respond throughout the developing hazard and score different points you will always score the highest number of points i.e. if you react and score five then three then two points you will be awarded five points. You will not be able to review your answers to the hazard perception test as on the road, you will only have one chance to respond to the developing hazard, so you will need to concentrate throughout each clip. If you react inappropriately during the video clip by clicking continuously or in a pattern of responses you will score zero for that clip. At the end of the clip a pop-up box will appear informing you that you have scored zero for that particular clip. Mahesh Ugale - SEO Consultant Hazard Pedrception Test, Driving theory test, Theory test
22 Jun 2008
3855
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0:38
The government is committed to reducing the numbers killed and seriously injured on Britain's roads by 40 per cent by 2010. The hazard perception element was introduced into the driving test in November 2002 as one of the measures that should help achieve this target by encouraging appropriate training in scanning the road, recognising at the first opportunity from the clues that a potentially dangerous situation might arise and adopting a driving plan to reduce the risk. During the development of this test, the Driving Standards Agency (DSA) worked closely with colleagues from the Transport Research Laboratory (TRL) and the road safety division of the Department for Transport, both of whom thought this test suitable for testing the hazard awareness skills of all drivers. How the test works The hazard perception part is delivered on a computer and you respond by clicking a button on the mouse. You will be presented with a series of 14 video clips which feature every day road scenes, in each clip there will be at least one developing hazard, but one of the clips will feature two developing hazards. To achieve a high score you will need to respond to the developing hazard during the early part of its development. The maximum you can score on each hazard is five. Recognition of available clues and perception of danger are skills that are necessary in all drivers and riders, irrespective of the vehicle used. For this reason, the same version of the hazard perception test is used for all categories of test. An example of when to respond As an example, of how to identify and respond to a developing hazard, consider a parked vehicle on the side of the road. When you first see it, it is not doing anything; it is just a parked vehicle. If you were to respond to the vehicle at this point, you would not score any marks, but you would not lose any marks. However, when you get closer to the vehicle, you notice that the car's right hand indicator starts to flash. The indicator would lead you to believe that the driver of the vehicle has an intention of moving away, therefore the hazard is now developing and a response at this point would score marks. The indicator coming on is a sign that the parked vehicle has changed its status from a potential hazard into a developing hazard. When you get closer to the vehicle, you will probably see the vehicle start to move away from the side of the road; another response should be made at this point. Different clips in the test will have various signs to indicate that the hazard is changing its status and is now starting to develop. How hazard perception test is scored The maximum you can score for each developing hazard is five points. If you respond throughout the developing hazard and score different points you will always score the highest number of points i.e. if you react and score five then three then two points you will be awarded five points. You will not be able to review your answers to the hazard perception test as on the road, you will only have one chance to respond to the developing hazard, so you will need to concentrate throughout each clip. If you react inappropriately during the video clip by clicking continuously or in a pattern of responses you will score zero for that clip. At the end of the clip a pop-up box will appear informing you that you have scored zero for that particular clip. Mahesh Ugale - SEO Consultant Hazard Pedrception Test, Driving theory test, Theory test
31 Mar 2008
5046
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1:43
This video is about hazardous areas and the instrumentation used in them.
13 Apr 2009
548
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2:07
Water Hazard Assassin Mission
1 Jun 2008
248
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1:52
Since the almostGolf ball floats, if you land in the water, you have to hit out! Here are a few ways you can incorporate water hazards onto your 'golf course'. Water hazards really add to your course design when you are doing a charity fundraising event or just screwing around.
24 Jun 2008
445
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1:35
Hazardous Driver Awards Episode 1 00:00 Rather than get mad and exercise my truck's air horn when I see motorists putting others at risk by breaking the laws of the roadw Rather than get mad and exercise my truck's air horn when I see motorists putting others at risk by breaking the laws of the roadway, I have decided to cheer them on and reward them with Hazzy Awards. Episode 1 is from Oregon.
2 Oct 2008
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3:45
This video describes a training course on Hazardous Area Instrumentation from Abhisam Software
30 Jun 2008
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0:32
The video describes Hazardous Area Instrumentation training
26 Jul 2008
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1:19
Siren Premier Hazard 6004 at home
29 May 2009
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0:32
This video regards hazardous areas in chemical plants and how to learn about them
4 Aug 2008
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5:52
*******matthewloop.meta-ehealth**** Are pesticides really hazardous? Find out more natural solutions to health problems in the book "Cracking the Cancer Code." Matthew Loop
16 Apr 2009
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