Results for: hazards Search Results
Family Filter:
2:50
For free advice after a truck accident, call 877-999-TAAR (8227) Many trucking companies across the country are cutting corners on safety in exchange for a bigger bottom line. This leads to unfit truckers driving unmaintained trucks, and becoming involved in serious truck accidents. This video addresses the workings of dangerous trucking companies, and what the lawyers of the Truck Accident Attorneys Roundtable are doing to combat this hazardous behavior — and prevent future truck crashes. The Truck Accident Attorneys Roundtable is a new kind of law firm, comprised of some of the most experienced and respected trucking attorneys from around the nation working together on your case. We will discover each trucking safety violation that led to the crash, hold the company accountable and make sure you get the best result possible. Remember, our law firm is so committed to truck safety that we give a portion of every fee we make directly to trucking safety advocacy groups.
12 Mar 2017
16
Share Video

15:44
Balanced Health Today Call Now 1(888)277-4980 Understanding the type of radiation received (alphaHelpalpha particleA form of particulate ionizing radiation made up of two neutrons and two protons. Alpha particles pose no direct or external radiation threat; however, they can pose a serious health threat if ingested or inhaled., betaHelpbeta particleA form of particulate ionizing radiation made up of small, fast-moving particles. Some beta particles are capable of penetrating the skin and causing damage such as skin burns. Beta-emitters are most hazardous when they are inhaled or swallowed., gamma, x-rayHelpx-raysA form of ionizing radiation made up of photons. X-rays are capable of passing completely through the human body. Medical x-rays are the single largest source of man-made radiation exposure.), the way a person is exposed (external vs. internal), and for how long a person is exposed are all important in estimating health effects. The risk from exposure to a particular radioactive element depends on: * The energy of the radiation it emits. * Its activity (how often it emits radiation). * The rate at which the body metabolizes and eliminates the radionuclide following ingestion or inhalation. * Where the radionuclide concentrates in the body and how long it stays there. The risk that exposure to a radioactive element will cause a particular health effect also depends on whether exposure is internal or external. * Internal exposure is when radioactive material gets inside the body by eating, drinking, breathing or injection (from certain medical procedures). Alpha and beta particles pose a serious health threat if significant quantities are inhaled or ingested. Outside the body, alpha particles are too large to pass through the skin or a thin layer of clothes. * External exposure (also known as direct exposure) is when the radioactive source is outside of your body. X-rays and gamma rays can pass through your body, depositing energy as they go.
22 Mar 2017
184
Share Video

1:50
Kitchen Duct Cleaning Services - A Professional Kitchen Necessity 1 Kitchen duct cleaning is a standard necessity in proper maintenance of a professional kitchen, to comply with the hygiene and fire safety codes 2 This service includes a set of special cleaning processes like -degreasing, -disinfecting, and -kitchen exhaust and vent cleaning 3 Professional kitchen duct cleaning services help reduce health and fire risks, while offering several other advantages as well 4 The most significant reasons why kitchen duct cleaning is important include: -Reduced health hazards, -Lower expenditure, -Improved health & safety standards, and -Low risk of kitchen fires 5 Reduced Health Hazards - During this procedure, damages can be assessed, and repairs made to prevent particles and fumes from escaping the ducts and entering other parts of the building 6 Various particles that pass through these ducts include smoke, steam, airborne grease and other hazardous particles that could have an ill-effect on one’s health 7 Lower Expenditure - By availing these services and keeping your facility in compliance with fire and safety standards, you are liable to lower insurance payments 8 In Addition, proper cleaning and maintenance of your kitchen ducts, exhaust systems and hoods, results in a lower need for replacement of parts and damage control. 9 Improved Health & Safety Standards - Kitchen duct cleaning services reduce risks and improve your facility’s compliance with health and hygiene standards, and fire safety codes Visit yellowpages-uae com to Contact Kitchen Exhaust Duct Cleaning Services in Dubai i e at http://www yellowpages-uae com/uae/dubai/kitchen-duct-cleaning-services
23 Mar 2017
31
Share Video

3:03
Have you ever went looking for gold in the waterfalls in the Philippines? Just another awesome place to discover in the Philippines. What I'm looking for is signs that there is gold being washed down from the hills above. Looking For Gold in the Waterfalls in the Philippines is a lot of fun. You can bring your friends or family that likes adventure and new discoveries because they're gonna love this. If there is one water hazard in nature that traps gold, it would be waterfalls. So watch this video and check out how to find golds here in the Philippines. Cheers, Sean
24 Mar 2017
9
Share Video

15:44
Balanced Health Today Call Now 1(888)277-4980 You cannot see, hear, smell, taste, or touch radiation. You can only detect radiation with special equipment. Detecting Non-Ionizing Radiation (NIR) Since non-ionizing radiation is simply low-energy waves of the electromagnetic spectrum (radio waves or microwaves), detection is hard. The easiest way is to look for any nearby antennas, satellite dishes, or radio towers. Or, if you can listen to your radio, watch TV, have cell service or use wireless internet, Bluetooth, wireless mouse or keyboard you are definitely being exposed to NIR. To measure the quantity of radio/microwaves you will need an EMF (electromagnetic field) meter. A very simple way to determine the wavelength of NIR is the length of the antenna. As a general rule, the shorter the antenna, the more energized the waves. To pick up radio waves, an antenna must be the length of the longest wavelength. You can compare the antenna length to the electromagnetic spectrum chart to find the energy intensity. Detecting Ionizing Radiation Ionizing radiation can be measured very precisely — much more precisely than other potentially hazardous materials. One of the basic measuring instruments is the Geiger-Muller counter. The instrument consists of a detector set at the end of a probe with counting electronics. This instrument counts the number of radioactive particles entering a sensitive detection chamber, and translates that signal into a needle movement on an analog dial or a value displayed on a screen. The Geiger counter emits a click for every particle, so with only background radiation, the instrument clicks every few seconds. In a high radiation environment, it clicks rapidly in proportion to the radiation level. This way, the user gets a visible as well as audible measurement of radioactivity. Some people receive exposure to radiation as part of their employment (radiologists and nuclear plant workers). Worker radiation exposures are carefully
28 Mar 2017
122
Share Video

1:59
Driving theory test questions for Car & motorcycle, 1200+ official DSA online questions Pass your driving theory test, 250+ free theory test online questions. Hazard Perception test Video Clips
6 Apr 2007
4569
Share Video

6:03
www.BgreenTV.com HELP US SAVE THE PLANET MAKE A ECO FRIENDLY VIDEO TODAY OR SUBMIT ONE YOU FIND AND HELP US SAVE THE PLANET The hilarious and eccentric Jerry the foilman delivers a battery to the local hazardous waste facility, and discovers a brand new medium for his creative expression. --Sent via http://heyspread.com : Upload videos to multiple sites quickly
10 Aug 2007
327
Share Video

2:07
www.BgreenTV.com HELP US SAVE THE PLANET MAKE A ECO FRIENDLY VIDEO TODAY OR SUBMIT ONE YOU FIND AND HELP US SAVE THE PLANET The Bergen County Utilities Authority hosted a Household Hazardous Waste Collection Day at Bergen Community College in Paramus. Check out the benefits and what you can bring to a collection. --Sent via http://heyspread.com : Upload videos to multiple sites quickly
10 Aug 2007
294
Share Video

1:49
www.BgreenTV.com HELP US SAVE THE PLANET MAKE A ECO FRIENDLY VIDEO TODAY OR SUBMIT ONE YOU FIND AND HELP US SAVE THE PLANET Tips for Handling Household Hazardous Waste --Sent via http://heyspread.com : Upload videos to multiple sites quickly
10 Aug 2007
261
Share Video

3:07
Microwave oven, The Hidden Hazards. Recent research shows that microwave oven-cooked food suffers severe molecular damage. When eaten, it causes abnormal changes in human blood and immune systems. Not surprisingly, the public has been denied details on these significant health dangers. Technology holds great promise when developed, promoted and used by ethical individuals and institutions. Harmful or immorally utilized technologies should spur us to take action to set things right. To that end, we share this information. The purpose of this report is to show proof - evidence - that microwave cooking is not natural, nor healthy, and is far more dangerous to the human body than anyone could imagine. However, the microwave oven manufacturers, Washington City politics, and plain old human nature are suppressing the facts and evidence. Because of this, people are continuing to microwave their food - in blissful ignorance - without knowing the effects and danger of doing so. Microwaves unsafe for baby's milk. "Microwaving baby formulas converted certain trans-amino acids into their synthetic cis-isomers. Synthetic isomers, whether cis-amino acids or trans-fatty acids, are not biologically active. Further, one of the amino acids, L-proline, was converted to its d-isomer, which is known to be neurotoxic (poisonous to the nervous system) and nephrotoxic (poisonous to the kidneys). It's bad enough that many babies are not nursed, but now they are given fake milk (baby formula) made even more toxic via microwaving." Microwaved blood kills patient. In 1991, there was a lawsuit in Oklahoma concerning the hospital use of a microwave oven to warm blood needed in a transfusion. The case involved a hip surgery patient, Norma Levitt, who died from a simple blood transfusion. It seems the nurse had warmed the blood in a microwave oven. This tragedy makes it very apparent that there's much more to "heating" with microwaves than we've been led to believe. Blood for transfusions is routinely warmed, but not in microwave ovens. In the case of Mrs. Levitt, the microwaving altered the blood and it killed her. It's very obvious that this form of microwave radiation "heating" does something to the substances it heats. It's also becoming quite apparent that people who process food in a microwave oven are also ingesting these "unknowns".
23 Feb 2008
2790
Share Video

0:28
The government is committed to reducing the numbers killed and seriously injured on Britain's roads by 40 per cent by 2010. The hazard perception element was introduced into the driving test in November 2002 as one of the measures that should help achieve this target by encouraging appropriate training in scanning the road, recognising at the first opportunity from the clues that a potentially dangerous situation might arise and adopting a driving plan to reduce the risk. During the development of this test, the Driving Standards Agency (DSA) worked closely with colleagues from the Transport Research Laboratory (TRL) and the road safety division of the Department for Transport, both of whom thought this test suitable for testing the hazard awareness skills of all drivers. How the test works The hazard perception part is delivered on a computer and you respond by clicking a button on the mouse. You will be presented with a series of 14 video clips which feature every day road scenes, in each clip there will be at least one developing hazard, but one of the clips will feature two developing hazards. To achieve a high score you will need to respond to the developing hazard during the early part of its development. The maximum you can score on each hazard is five. Recognition of available clues and perception of danger are skills that are necessary in all drivers and riders, irrespective of the vehicle used. For this reason, the same version of the hazard perception test is used for all categories of test. An example of when to respond As an example, of how to identify and respond to a developing hazard, consider a parked vehicle on the side of the road. When you first see it, it is not doing anything; it is just a parked vehicle. If you were to respond to the vehicle at this point, you would not score any marks, but you would not lose any marks. However, when you get closer to the vehicle, you notice that the car's right hand indicator starts to flash. The indicator would lead you to believe that the driver of the vehicle has an intention of moving away, therefore the hazard is now developing and a response at this point would score marks. The indicator coming on is a sign that the parked vehicle has changed its status from a potential hazard into a developing hazard. When you get closer to the vehicle, you will probably see the vehicle start to move away from the side of the road; another response should be made at this point. Different clips in the test will have various signs to indicate that the hazard is changing its status and is now starting to develop. How hazard perception test is scored The maximum you can score for each developing hazard is five points. If you respond throughout the developing hazard and score different points you will always score the highest number of points i.e. if you react and score five then three then two points you will be awarded five points. You will not be able to review your answers to the hazard perception test as on the road, you will only have one chance to respond to the developing hazard, so you will need to concentrate throughout each clip. If you react inappropriately during the video clip by clicking continuously or in a pattern of responses you will score zero for that clip. At the end of the clip a pop-up box will appear informing you that you have scored zero for that particular clip. Mahesh Ugale - SEO Consultant Hazard Pedrception Test, Driving theory test, Theory test
22 Jun 2008
3728
Share Video

0:38
The government is committed to reducing the numbers killed and seriously injured on Britain's roads by 40 per cent by 2010. The hazard perception element was introduced into the driving test in November 2002 as one of the measures that should help achieve this target by encouraging appropriate training in scanning the road, recognising at the first opportunity from the clues that a potentially dangerous situation might arise and adopting a driving plan to reduce the risk. During the development of this test, the Driving Standards Agency (DSA) worked closely with colleagues from the Transport Research Laboratory (TRL) and the road safety division of the Department for Transport, both of whom thought this test suitable for testing the hazard awareness skills of all drivers. How the test works The hazard perception part is delivered on a computer and you respond by clicking a button on the mouse. You will be presented with a series of 14 video clips which feature every day road scenes, in each clip there will be at least one developing hazard, but one of the clips will feature two developing hazards. To achieve a high score you will need to respond to the developing hazard during the early part of its development. The maximum you can score on each hazard is five. Recognition of available clues and perception of danger are skills that are necessary in all drivers and riders, irrespective of the vehicle used. For this reason, the same version of the hazard perception test is used for all categories of test. An example of when to respond As an example, of how to identify and respond to a developing hazard, consider a parked vehicle on the side of the road. When you first see it, it is not doing anything; it is just a parked vehicle. If you were to respond to the vehicle at this point, you would not score any marks, but you would not lose any marks. However, when you get closer to the vehicle, you notice that the car's right hand indicator starts to flash. The indicator would lead you to believe that the driver of the vehicle has an intention of moving away, therefore the hazard is now developing and a response at this point would score marks. The indicator coming on is a sign that the parked vehicle has changed its status from a potential hazard into a developing hazard. When you get closer to the vehicle, you will probably see the vehicle start to move away from the side of the road; another response should be made at this point. Different clips in the test will have various signs to indicate that the hazard is changing its status and is now starting to develop. How hazard perception test is scored The maximum you can score for each developing hazard is five points. If you respond throughout the developing hazard and score different points you will always score the highest number of points i.e. if you react and score five then three then two points you will be awarded five points. You will not be able to review your answers to the hazard perception test as on the road, you will only have one chance to respond to the developing hazard, so you will need to concentrate throughout each clip. If you react inappropriately during the video clip by clicking continuously or in a pattern of responses you will score zero for that clip. At the end of the clip a pop-up box will appear informing you that you have scored zero for that particular clip. Mahesh Ugale - SEO Consultant Hazard Pedrception Test, Driving theory test, Theory test
31 Mar 2008
4899
Share Video

0:14
The hazard perception part is delivered on a computer and you respond by clicking a button on the mouse. You will be presented with a series of 14 video clips which feature every day road scenes, in each clip there will be at least one developing hazard, but one of the clips will feature two developing hazards. To achieve a high score you will need to respond to the developing hazard during the early part of its development. The maximum you can score on each hazard is five. Recognition of available clues and perception of danger are skills that are necessary in all drivers and riders, irrespective of the vehicle used. For this reason, the same version of the hazard perception test is used for all categories of test. An example of when to respond As an example, of how to identify and respond to a developing hazard, consider a parked vehicle on the side of the road. When you first see it, it is not doing anything; it is just a parked vehicle. If you were to respond to the vehicle at this point, you would not score any marks, but you would not lose any marks. However, when you get closer to the vehicle, you notice that the car's right hand indicator starts to flash. The indicator would lead you to believe that the driver of the vehicle has an intention of moving away, therefore the hazard is now developing and a response at this point would score marks. The indicator coming on is a sign that the parked vehicle has changed its status from a potential hazard into a developing hazard. When you get closer to the vehicle, you will probably see the vehicle start to move away from the side of the road; another response should be made at this point. Different clips in the test will have various signs to indicate that the hazard is changing its status and is now starting to develop. How hazard perception test is scored The maximum you can score for each developing hazard is five points. If you respond throughout the developing hazard and score different points you will always score the highest number of points i.e. if you react and score five then three then two points you will be awarded five points. You will not be able to review your answers to the hazard perception test as on the road, you will only have one chance to respond to the developing hazard, so you will need to concentrate throughout each clip. If you react inappropriately during the video clip by clicking continuously or in a pattern of responses you will score zero for that clip. At the end of the clip a pop-up box will appear informing you that you have scored zero for that particular clip. Mahesh Ugale - SEO Consultant Hazard Pedrception Test, Driving theory test, Theory test
1 Apr 2008
3860
Share Video

0:25
How the test works The hazard perception part is delivered on a computer and you respond by clicking a button on the mouse. You will be presented with a series of 14 video clips which feature every day road scenes, in each clip there will be at least one developing hazard, but one of the clips will feature two developing hazards. To achieve a high score you will need to respond to the developing hazard during the early part of its development. The maximum you can score on each hazard is five. Recognition of available clues and perception of danger are skills that are necessary in all drivers and riders, irrespective of the vehicle used. For this reason, the same version of the hazard perception test is used for all categories of test. An example of when to respond As an example, of how to identify and respond to a developing hazard, consider a parked vehicle on the side of the road. When you first see it, it is not doing anything; it is just a parked vehicle. If you were to respond to the vehicle at this point, you would not score any marks, but you would not lose any marks. However, when you get closer to the vehicle, you notice that the car's right hand indicator starts to flash. The indicator would lead you to believe that the driver of the vehicle has an intention of moving away, therefore the hazard is now developing and a response at this point would score marks. The indicator coming on is a sign that the parked vehicle has changed its status from a potential hazard into a developing hazard. When you get closer to the vehicle, you will probably see the vehicle start to move away from the side of the road; another response should be made at this point. Different clips in the test will have various signs to indicate that the hazard is changing its status and is now starting to develop. How hazard perception test is scored The maximum you can score for each developing hazard is five points. If you respond throughout the developing hazard and score different points you will always score the highest number of points i.e. if you react and score five then three then two points you will be awarded five points. You will not be able to review your answers to the hazard perception test as on the road, you will only have one chance to respond to the developing hazard, so you will need to concentrate throughout each clip. If you react inappropriately during the video clip by clicking continuously or in a pattern of responses you will score zero for that clip. At the end of the clip a pop-up box will appear informing you that you have scored zero for that particular clip. Mahesh Ugale - SEO Consultant Hazard Pedrception Test, Driving theory test, Theory test
2 Apr 2008
5964
Share Video

1:43
This video is about hazardous areas and the instrumentation used in them.
13 Apr 2009
517
Share Video

2:07
Water Hazard Assassin Mission
1 Jun 2008
217
Share Video