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BY BRANDON TWICHELL ANCHOR: CHANCE SEALES You're watching multisource health video news analysis from Newsy. It’s been one year since President Obama signed into law the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act -- widely considered the biggest piece of social legislation since Social Security. Analysts are observing the one-year anniversary with a look at the law’s effects. An NPR reporter tells Kaiser Health News seniors have gained the most from the health care law - especially when it comes to prescription drug coverage. “Last year, if they fell into the donut hole, they got a $250 check. This year they’re getting a 50% discount on brand name drugs if they reach that donut hole. They’re also getting preventive care with, again, with no deductible like many other people, and they’re also getting an annual wellness physical, something they haven’t gotten in Medicare before.” But the law - dubbed “Obamacare” by its critics - doesn’t have many supporters in small businesses. Cincinnati ABC affiliate WCPO interviewed a coffee shop owner, who says he’s struggling to meet the new law’s requirements. ERIC REICHARDT: “I don’t feel it’s done a lot of benefit for us, frankly there was a lot of paperwork initially to get things rolling, but for the most part, we’ve only seen costs increase.” BILL PRICE: “There were hopes the coffee shop could finally start offering insurance to part-timers, but they couldn’t afford it this year.” A recent poll from the Kaiser Family Foundation found most Americans are still confused about the law. Pollster Scott Rasmussen tells the conservative Heritage Foundation Americans will probably remain that way until the law changes their daily routine. “They will be interested when they see it affecting their life, and that could be in terms of expanded deficits, which is sort of a distant relationship, or it could be when they have to change their insurance coverage or when the doctor says ‘I have to do this because of the new health care law.’ It won’t even really matter if it’s true, they will attribute anything bad that happens to this new law.” That Kaiser poll also found a slight majority were against the law - but also against replacing or repealing it. The Washington Post’s Ezra Klein suggests that’s because at the end of the day, it does what it’s supposed to do: and that’s cover more people and control costs. “Is it a perfect piece of legislation? Not even close. Will everything work as expected? Almost certainly not. But for all its flaws, it’s a good law, which is why Republicans have had so much trouble coming up with state plans that could cover more people at a lower cost.” 'Like Newsy' on Facebook for daily updates. Get more health video news analysis from Newsy. Transcript by Newsy.
26 Mar 2011
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2:05
BY MALLORY PERRYMAN ANCHOR CHANCE SEALES You're watching multisource health news analysis from Newsy Big moms- and big kids- just don’t know how big they really are. That’s according to a new study out of Columbia University. Minneapolis CBS affiliate WCCO has the details. “The medical center found many heavy-set mothers and children think they are slimmer than they actually are. 82% Of the obese women and 42% of the overweight women underestimated their weight. At the same time 86% of the children under estimated their weight.” We’re not talking about a few pounds of extra love around the handles here. To be classified as “obese”, the women in this study had to have a body mass index of more than 30. Normal is about 25. So what’s with the misperception? CNN explains... “As overweight and obesity have become more common, those who are carrying unhealthy extra pounds are increasingly likely to see their weight as normal, and are therefore unlikely to feel the need to shed some of those pounds.” The study also found that nearly half of the moms with an overweight child believed their child's weight to be normal. USA Today talked with one pediatrician who says- about half of her patients are overweight or obese. “The norm has become overweight...It's really depressing. They just figure it's not a big a deal. Sometimes when I tell them their kids' cholesterol is high, that gets to them, because it's something tangible." CNN’s Elizabeth Cohen explains- parents don’t see the extra weight on their kids for the same reason they don’t see it on themselves. ELIZABETH COHEN: “Part of it is that so many children are obese these days that when you look around, sure your kid looks a little chunky but maybe his best friend is even chunkier.” ANCHOR: “So it’s the new normal to carry too much weight?” ELIZABETH COHEN: “It’s the new normal.” Critics say the results of the Columbia study aren’t truly representative of the population since most of the participants were Hispanic. But US News and World Report points out- it’s not the first time research has revealed that fat may be the new norm. It references a 2010 study that found... “30 percent of overweight people thought their weight was normal, while 70 percent of those who were obese thought they were merely overweight. Most thought that lack of exercise, rather than poor eating habits, was the cause.” Follow Newsy_Videos on Twitter Get more multisource video news analysis from Newsy Transcript by Newsy
26 Mar 2011
58
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2:27
BY LIZ REED ANCHOR ALEX HOLLEY You're watching multisource health news analysis from Newsy One small child with a peanut allergy has led a group of parents to protest her presence in a Florida classroom. Edgewater Elementary is required by law to protect the 6-year-old girl, which includes employing a peanut-sniffing dog, forcing her classmate to wash their hands repeatedly and rinse out mouths. CNN breaks down the tension building between parents and the precautions. REPORTER: “Parents are debating whether the rule infringes on the rights of students and take time away from education.” PARENT 1: “I guess it’s not fair, for one kid to have a set of standards that rest of the kids have to abide by.” PARENT 2: “It’s protecting the safety of the child, everybody has a right to an education.” The Centers for Disease Control says food allergies have increased by 18 percent from 1997 to 2007, so the school’s actions could impact other districts with allergic students. NBC reveals Edgewater parents’ frustrations. REPORTER: “How much time is being wasted washing hands in your mind?” MOTHER: “30 minutes, almost 30 minutes a day.” REPORTER: “In a week?” MOTHER: “Two and a half hours.” REPORTER: “And do you add it up over the school year?” MOTHER: “Almost, what, 80 hours?” REPORTER: “And that to you is?” MOTHER: “A lot of time that’s being taken away from their education.” But a reporter from Orlando’s WFLX, who also has a child with food allergies, reports the school’s protocol is helpful, if not necessary, for the health of all children. “I have been told over and over again that because of the protocol of being in class with Brody, other kids don’t get sick as much. Think about it, if you’re forcing kids to wash their hands, if you’re forcing kids to wipe their faces--the germs, forget about the allergen, the germs aren’t going back and forth.” A former teacher weighed in on Fox News - questioning the burden being put on first graders. “This is borderline ridiculous. The mother said the child could not just develop a rash but possibly die if she were exposed. So are you telling me that your placing the potential death of a 6-year-old in the hands of a 6-year-old?” WKMG goes straight to the source and asks the father about his daughter’s role in the struggle. REPORTER: “The Bailey’s apologize for the interruption but say it’s their job to protect their child.” DAD: “We would love for everything to be normal. And I’d love to have everybody else have a normal life.” In response to the parents’ protest, school officials decided students will no longer have to rinse their mouths with water. 'Like Newsy' on Facebook for updates in your feed. Get more multisource health video news analysis from Newsy. Transcript by Newsy
26 Mar 2011
293
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0:45
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28 Mar 2011
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2:56
BY CHRISTINE SLUSSER ANCHOR: CHANCE SEALES You're watching multisource health news analysis from Newsy There’s a ...fairly... new super bug in town-- known as CRKP. There were 350 reported cases of the antibiotic-resistant infection in California between June and December of 2010. Media outlets whipped out their medical authorities to explain. First to CBN News-- who spoke with Dr. Andrew Fishman. FISHMAN: “The scary part about these cases are that it’s a bacteria that is pretty common, but develops resistance to mostly the anti-biotics that we have. These are usually in patients that have previously either been in a nursing home or in other hospitals...” ...and CNN spoke with its Senior Medical Correspondent Elizabeth Cohen...who had a grim outlook on what happens if you get bit by the bug. “I was corresponding with a doctor in Israel just now because they’ve had one of the biggest outbreaks ever, and there, the death rate from this bug was 44%...Alright? And this is a place with good health care. So 44%...and he thinks it’s maybe a but lower in other places, but still, when it kills about a third or more of the people who get it, that’s pretty serious. So you really wanna work on prevention.” Good Morning America spoke with a big dog of its own--Dr. Richard Besser, former director of the CDC in Atlanta. He says this time around--when people hear the word “super bug”--they should be scared. He adds- it’s up to the hospitals to stop the spread. BESSER: “A lot of it comes down to hospitals. They need to make sure that health care workers aren’t spreading from patient to patient. That’s mainly what takes place. (flash) When you’re sitting there with your relative, if anyone comes in and wants to touch your relative without washing their hands, you have to say something. Because that will make a difference. It will make sure--because in some of these cases when they look, people aren’t washing their hands.” California’a ABC-affiliate KABC reports CRKP is in the same lethal family as eColi. And naturally...it also scouted out a doctor. Dr. Kimberly Shriner says it could be the medical providers fault the bug became “super” in the first place. SHRINER: “‘"One of the real reasons we're having problems with antibiotic resistance is the overuse of antibiotics. We perhaps are a little bit too quick to put people on antibiotics for things that maybe really don't warrant them.’” REPORTER: So what can you do stop the spread of superbugs? Dr. Shriner says if your doctor says you don't need antibiotics, listen to what he or she is trying to tell you.” The bug is mainly reported in elderly patients who are in and out of hospitals frequently, use defibrillators or catheters--and over half the time are female. Wired reports with alarm the growing number of cases... “By 2000, that same resistance pattern surfaced in hospitals in Manhattan: first one, then another, then a third and fourth. Then it began to spread to cities where New Yorkers vacation, and then to countries where they travel. Now, more than a decade later, it has reached at least 37 states and at least a dozen countries around the world.” LA’s KTLA reports- CRKP is treatable with an antibiotic called Challistin- but the drug has some risky side effects and it doesn’t always work. Follow Newsy_Videos on Twitter Get more multisource video news analysis from Newsy Trancript by Newsy
5 Apr 2011
185
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2:28
BY LIZ REED You're watching multisource health news analysis from Newsy If you were to discover something no one else has understood before -- does that mean you own it? That’s the question facing the courts in an ongoing lawsuit against Myriad Genetic’s patent for genes related to ovarian and breast cancer. Last week, a U.S. district court ruled against Myriad, negating its patent. Now the company has to go before the Court of Appeals in a case that could ultimately set a precedent affecting 20 percent of the human genome. (Video: Cordoza News Brief) KSL breaks down the controversy: “More than a decade ago, the patent office granted Myriad Genetics the sole rights to study two genes closely associated with increased risk of breast and ovarian cancer. Myriad is the only company that can offer this test, which can cost more than $3,000 and is not covered by all types of insurance.” Genome scientists argue the patents prohibit others from conducting scientific research on breast and ovarian cancer. The appeals court must decide whether isolated genes are products of nature or man-made inventions: information-carrying molecules that cannot be ‘owned,’ or chemical compounds that can be patented? CBS’s Katie Couric thinks the latter: “No one wants to hamper companies like Myriad, but we also shouldn’t limit access to something as basic as our DNA. The human genome still holds secrets that can save lives and you can’t put a price tag, or a patent, on that.” But a blogger for Science Blog’s Bioephemera points out that without patents, it will be too big a risk to invest in developing not only new diagnostics, but also new drugs. “Companies prefer to develop molecules that are patent protectable, so they know they can have a period of market dominance to earn back their R&D investment (and make substantial revenue, of course). If it is really true that inability to patent genes would chill pharma R&D, and pharma couldn't find any other way to protect its investment, the decrease in R&D could be a bad thing for patients in the long run.” While new companies may be ready to move in on Myriad’s territory, a Genome Sciences research professor tells NPR that in the end, it’s likely Myriad won’t be completely shut out by any ruling. Dr. COOK-DEEGAN: “Myriad does have some other patents and some claims in even these patents that were not overturned. So I suspect that most of the lawyers at places that might be interested in entering this market would be doing so at some risk.” A decision from the Court of Appeals is expected in the next few months. Some predict the case will make it all the way to the Supreme Court. Follow Newsy_Videos on Twitter Get more multisource video news analysis from Newsy Transcript by Newsy
9 Apr 2011
275
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2:40
BY LIZ REED ANCHOR AUSTIN KIM You're watching multisource health news analysis from Newsy Could a weight-loss pill help you lose 10 percent body fat while lowering your cholesterol and blood pressure? According to researchers of the weight-loss supplement Qnexa, if you take enough of it--yes. Recently published trial data shows obese patients who took high doses lost an average of 22 pounds a year while improving their health and ability to keep off the weight. But the FDA, and media outlets, still have their doubts. Reporter: “We all would love to take a pill to lose weight, is this the pill? Dietician: “No, I don’t think there should be a pill out there.” (Video: Fox News) “Side effects including depression, concentration, memory problems.” (Video: MSNBC) FDA Panel: “I’m also equally concerned about the erosion of the public’s trust every time we approve a drug and don’t get it right.” (Video: NBC) The FDA rejected Qnexa’s application in October, saying there wasn’t enough research about heart risks and birth defects linked to the drug’s key ingredients, topiramate and phentermine. The LA Times cautions readers -- don’t be fooled by the released data -- it doesn’t disprove the risks nor show real benefits. “This newly published article details one of two clinical trials that were evaluated by the FDA before the agency decided to deny approval for Qnexa in October 2010... they concluded that the weight-loss difference between those taking Qnexa and those taking a placebo was ‘of nominal statistical significance.’" So what’s the point of releasing the data? It’s been 10 years since the FDA approved a weight loss supplement, and according to a dietitian on ABC, the pills are meant to do what diet and exercise cannot. “Most of the medications coming down the pipeline, the ones that have just gone through the FDA and not been approved, plus some coming through now, work on appetite and metabolism. One of the things I hear all the time from my patients is that they are hungry, and I say it with a vengeance: they’re hungry!” WLWT shows a success story to advocate Qnexa’s effectiveness, but also notes, it’s no miracle pill. REPORTER: “Meg Evans took one of these pills everyday for 2 years. She says the results were dramatic.” EVANS: “I just started steadily loosing weight. Every time I came in, the scale just went straight down.” (FLASH) REPORTER: “OK, now we should tell you though that Meg Evans lost the weight using the Qnexa pill plus diet and exercise, you have to do it.” CBS also points out -- besides the side effects and heart risks, the study leaves out an important detail. “There's one other problem - researchers don't know what happens when you stop the drug. Will patients be able to keep those pounds off?” Could Qnexa be the answer to weight loss woes? Weigh in on our comment section. Follow Newsy on Twitter Newsy_Videos for health video news in your feed. Get more multisource health video news analysis from Newsy. Transcript by Newsy.
16 Apr 2011
343
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2:27
BY LIZ REED You're watching multisource health news analysis from Newsy Dentists and doctors are warning -- think twice before gettin’ down. A new study suggests oral sex is the leading cause of oral cancer in non-smoking men in the U.S.. But how does sex lead to cancer? It’s a nasty sexually transmitted virus called HPV. Right now, about 20 million Americans have HPV, but because many never see symptoms, many don’t know they have it. KDSK breaks it down: Repoter: “When an HPV infection doesn't clear, or you're exposed multiple times by multiple partners, some people will go on to develop genital warts, or even cancer. Doctor: "The more times you are exposed, the greater the chance that you may develop cancer, just from a probability statement." KOIN identifies teen sexual attitudes as the source of the rapid spread. One dentist tells them if society doesn’t change, we’ll be dealing with a pandemic. Reporter: “Many teenagers who engage in oral sex don’t consider it to be real sex and view it as more casual. Dr. Oh says if that doesn’t change it might lead to a HPV epidemic and more cases of oral cancer.” Dentist: “80% of the population will eventually have HPV which is very scary to think about.” Dentist News Network reveals the biggest threat facing oral cancer patients are the dentists. Those who only perform selective cancer screenings based on common risk factors like age and genetics don’t realize the HPV threat. “Unfortunately, pre-screening still occurs in many dental offices because professionals are unaware of the new risk factor, HPV. And although it was reasonable in the past to pre-screen based on common risk factors, HPV now debunks this concept since HPV causes cancer in individuals that do not have the traditional risk factors. Everyone is at risk.” But if HPV vaccines have been approved since 2006, why wasn’t there a bigger push to get teens vaccinated? A contributor for AOL scrutinizes the manufactures’ one-sided view of the issue: “The massive push to vaccinate girls and women between the ages of 11 and 26 against HPV should have included boys and men from the beginning... But at the time [the vaccine] was licensed, there wasn't such an awareness about head or oral cancers or a willingness to accept that males played a part in the transmission of the virus.” According to the Center for Disease Control, only half of people who've been diagnosed with oral cancer will live longer than five years. (Source: Times of India) Get more multisource health video news analysis from Newsy. Transcript by Newsy.
23 Apr 2011
864
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2:00
BY KRISTEN BRODY You're watching multisource health news analysis from Newsy. Move over, Viagra -- A new erection-enhancing condom developed for Durex could boost performance in the bedroom. Researchers at a biotech firm in the United Kingdom developed the condom, which contains a gel to increase blood flow -- helping men maintain a firmer erection for longer. (Video Source: YouTube) CBS News reporter David Freeman writes some are calling CSD500 the Viagra of condoms -- posing a potential threat to sales of other condoms on the market. But Freeman focused more on the possible health effects than the sales impact. “Dr. Irwin Goldstein told CBS News...they will have to be proven to be safe and effective compared to oral PDE 5 inhibitors, a reference to Viagra and similar medications for erectile dysfunction. And it would be important to make sure that the drug does not pass from the condom to the woman." The Wall Street Journal is one step ahead of CBS--reporting the condom developers found a way for the drug-infused lubricant to only affect the condom wearer. And that’s not the only aspect of this condom Katherine Hobson set straight. “The product has been compared to Pfizer’s Viagra in condom form; that’s not exactly accurate, since it’s intended not for men with erectile dysfunction in general, but those who specifically have difficulties keeping an erection when using a condom.” But Portfolio.com didn’t waste time talking to doctors or medical experts... its blogger went straight to THE expert, condum guro Adam Glickman of CONDOMania. Glickman discussed what he says would be the real triumph of CSD500 -- getting more people to use condoms. (Video Source: YouTube) “The bottom line is protection, said Glickman...Such an innovation as the one under consideration could only help in that quest. At the end of the day, I am not how much that ‘drug’ will actually enhance sexual performance...What's important is that it is one more step in the process to 'normalize' condoms.” If approved by European regulators, CSD500 will hit shelves at the end of the year. As of now there is no official report on whether the new condom will come to the United States. Follow Newsy_Videos on Twitter Get more multisource video news analysis from Newsy Transcript by Newsy
26 Apr 2011
610
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2:28
BY LIZ REED ANCHOR JENNIFER MECKLES You're watching multisource health news analysis from Newsy. In case you didn’t hear, smoking was so 20th Century -- Electronic cigarettes and “vaping” are projected to dominate the market now that the FDA can only monitor them as tobacco products. A federal appeals courts struck down the FDA’s plan to regulate e-cigs as a “drug,” which would’ve forced the manufacturers to prove they are safe. Without this restriction, companies can market e-cigarettes as the healthy smoking alternative. The Sun Sentinel says with this new freedom for E-Cig companies, come a few risks: “E-cigarette users inhale a liquid nicotine mix derived from tobacco. Makers say they’re safer than regular cigarettes but the FDA says many of the brands tested had a carcinogen found in real cigarettes and a poisonous ingredient found in anti-freeze.” E-cigarettes contain a battery that heats up the nicotine inside so users inhale vapor instead of tar or ash. While Tobacco Free campaigns are worried about the marketing impact on kids, a WFLD health correspondent thinks their concerns aren’t realistic, based on economic impact. “One downside, or rather, one that might discourage kids, is that the start up pack costs about $70 so that might be a block for kids starting to smoke but that is a concern.” But some cities like San Francisco are taking the matter into their own hands by voting on public bans. An e-cig company rep told WLS that a ban is quote, “ignorant” because the product isn’t dangerous. Rep: "To have a product and ban a product you have to show cause, you have to show at one point in time that this product has harmed someone.” Reporter: “Story says the ingredients in the cigarettes are all FDA approved. They do not emit harmful second hand smoke and they can be used in public places like restaurants without bothering anyone else.” But Reason.com points out that the FDA still has a lot of control over the sale of e-cigarettes, despite lower health risks. The agency could find a loophole in whether the product would "significantly reduce harm and the risk of tobacco-related disease to individual tobacco users." “If, for example, a new cigarette is half as hazardous as existing cigarettes but the FDA thinks that fact will encourage every American to start smoking, it might decide that the net result of allowing the product on the market will be more smoking-related disease... it is exceedingly hard to argue that e-cigarettes fail this collectivist calculus. But that does not mean the FDA won't try." Experts project the FDA will decide how to regulate e-cigs within the next 18 months. Follow Newsy on Twitter Newsy_Videos for updates in your feed. Get more multisource health video news analysis from Newsy. Transcript by Newsy.
3 May 2011
240
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2:14
BY PAUL ROLFE ANCHOR MEGAN MURPHY You're watching multisource health news analysis from Newsy. “Nutcracker man” may have been more of a “grass-eater man”. A new study published in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences shows the ancient hominids -- whom scientists once thought ate primarily a nut diet -- were actually grass-chewers, more like a cow or pig. A researcher from the University of Colorado says this latest discovery is the result of years of work. “Frankly, we didn't expect to find the primate equivalent of a cow dangling from a remote twig of our family tree … If we had presented our new results at a scientific meeting 20 years ago, we would have been laughed out of the room.” (Live Science) ZME Science reports, University of Arkansas Anthropologist Peter Ungar first suggested the possibility that Nutcracker Man ate grass way back in 2007. That hunch was later confirmed by analyzing carbon in tooth enamel. “[W]hat they found was two types of carbon, one which is produced from tree leaves, nuts and fruit (C3 photosynthesis), and another from grasses and grasslike plants called sedges (C4 photosynthesis) … The high proportion of C4 vegetation in the diet of Paranthropus boisei makes it different from any other hominin to date.” Oh -- and the 50-year-old nickname, “Nutcracker Man” which was given to Paranthropus boisei, is now out the window. But South African Archaeologist Nikolaas van der Merwe tells Science News -- “Grass-eater” may not be completely accurate either. “Grasses grow seasonally in East Africa, so van der Merwe suspects that Nutcracker Man’s menu gravitated toward papyrus, a more dependable, year-round fixture of freshwater swamps that requires big teeth and considerable effort to chew.” Scientists believe P. boisei were walking around East Africa 2.3 to 1.2 million years ago, with grassy-plants making up three-quarters of their diet according to the study. The lead researcher tells The Salt Lake Tribune -- they were in competition with four-legged grazers, like the ancestors of hippos and horses. “They were eating at the same table … What surprised me was that over this length of time and space it was eating a restricted diet. It was extremely specialized and for a long time.” All this research was funded by the National Science Foundation and the University of Colorado. 'Like Newsy' on Facebook for updates in your newsfeed. Get more multisource science video news analysis from Newsy. Transcript by Newsy.
7 May 2011
241
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1:57
BY LIZ REED ANCHOR JESSICA HORD You're watching multisource health news analysis from Newsy. The FDA recently announced it will crack down on “bogus” remedies for STDs. The agency sent warnings to manufacturers selling unproven, over-the-counter pills and supplements for STDs like herpes and HIV. Reporter: “Different non-prescription products: Medavir, Herpaflor, C-Cure--they have one thing in common: trying to get you to believe they can cure STDs without having to go into an exam room.” Health Rep: “These are products according to the FDA website that are being promoted illegally and irresponsibly.” (Video: KRDO) So, how have these products gotten away with the scam? Many have website statements that say “proven effective in several official university research studies.” But that just won’t cut it for the FDA, who released a video claiming these products do all harm and nothing good. “Some STD treatments that you can buy without a prescription have untested ingredients in them that could make you sicker while leaving your STD untreated.” ABC-affiliate WGNO points to cultural backlash as the reason for the popularity of online remedies. A label that promises a quick fix is much more alluring than what can seem like a sentencing from your doctor. "They're concerned about confidentiality because they know that if they have a sexually transmitted disease, it's going to be reported and become part of the public health record... Plus, they worry that their sexual partners will be notified. But Salon.com says it’s not rocket science--people just want to be loved, and if a product promises to make them more desirable, it’s not a surprise people are buying it. “Look, sex finds us at our most vulnerable. We want stronger libidos, better orgasms... superior performance... How many industries have been built on these fundamental desires? It should come as no surprise then that there's a market for unproven STD "cures," or that people are willing to abandon all reason in pursuit of a magic fix that will make them feel "normal" and lovable again.” Companies have 15 days to notify the FDA of steps they have taken to correct violations. Failure to do so could result in legal action. 'Like Newsy' on Facebook for updates in news feed. Get more multisource health video news analysis from Newsy. Transcript by Newsy.
7 May 2011
168
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1:17
BY SAMANTHA MCCLENDON You're watching multisource health news analysis from Newsy. Forget weight loss pills- how about a weight loss...virus? Researchers at John Hopkins injected rats with a virus that inhibits the neuropeptide Y protein, which controls hunger and appetite -- and the rodents began shedding pounds. And according to Dvice -- the weight loss benefit is only the beginning. “Rather than the usual build-up of white fat at the base of the tail, there were indicators that the rats were forming brown fat, which is much easier for the body to burn through than the stuff that usually builds up around our bellies.” But a writer for Tek-Bull is torn over the experiment. He thinks it has the potential to bea man-made disaster. “No more running or working out, just sit at home and watch your body shed those pounds away. Currently the virus is still under ‘testing’ and its unclear as to when it will be tested in humans, but I think I can see a little bit of I am Legend in this story.” According to Science Daily -the fact the white fat turned into brown fat is a breakthrough in weight-loss technology. “The finding could lead to better obesity treatments for humans, the scientists report... ‘Cells in brown fat, considered a ‘good fat’... contain many little droplets of lipid, each with its own power source, which enables heat generation.... it mostly disappears, as adults have very little of this calorie-burning tissue.’” So- bring on the virus? Or keep it in the rat cage? 'Like' Newsy on Facebook for updates in your newsfeed Get more multisource video news analysis from Newsy Transcript by Newsy
10 May 2011
168
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1:25
BY ALISON SCHUTZ ANCHOR ALISON ARCHER You're watching multisource health news analysis from Newsy. A twist of fate...a 13-year-old Ohio boy is back on the baseball mound after a surgery that left one of his legs turned backwards. At ten years old, Dugan Smith learned he had bone cancer in his leg. Cleveland’s WJW has details on the procedure doctors performed that allows him to stay active. REPORTER: “Dugan had a tumor the size of a softball on his thigh bone.” DUGAN: “I didn’t know if I was every going to be able to run again. I didn’t know if it was going to work. So there was 100 things going through my mind.” REPORTER: “Dugan endured months of chemotherapy for choosing a procedure that would cut off a portion of his leg and turn it 180 degrees.” The Review Times calls it “A whole new ballgame” and the Columbus Dispatch dons him “The comeback kid”... ...commenting on the procedure that allows Dugan’s calf to function as his thigh and his ankle to bend like his knee. A Review Times writer adds the procedure was a no-brainer for Dugan. “Had he not chosen rotationplasty, playing baseball again may have been just a pipe dream for Dugan Smith. But instead of sitting on the bench, the seventh grader donned his No. 13 jersey ... as pitcher and first basemen.” Dugan’s leg will continue to grow and he must do physical therapy up to three times a week. A Cleveland Plain Dealer blogger says the boy has come a long way since his odd procedure. “Dugan plays baseball and basketball, went skiing last week, and plans to go out for freshman football in the fall ... but the leg does look strange.” Dugan says he still hopes to fulfill his dream of being a Major League Baseball player - noting he’d be the first pitcher in the league with a prosthetic leg. 'Like' Newsy on Facebook for updates in your newsfeed. Get more multisource video news analysis from Newsy. Transcript by Newsy
14 May 2011
785
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4:20
Our host Jamie Yuenger takes a look at health news from our team and from the experts at Health Magazine and Calorie Count. Links and show notes for all stories are here: Http://www.dietsinreview.com/healthbuzz
15 Jul 2011
210
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BY ERIK SHUTE ANCHOR CHRISTINA HARTMAN This is Newsy Now and here are the headlines you need to know. In U.S. news -- Fed Chairman Ben Bernanke will take the stage on Friday to speak on the nation’s economy. Analysts are watching for whether he’ll signal a third round of quantitative easing. CNBC examines the Fed’s options. “What they should do, in my opinion, is immediately talk to the FDIC and raise deposit insurance from the 250,000 dollars up to a billion that would stabilize the system… Unfortunately politically his hands are tied. It's a bit of a disastrous cocktail. You are having fiscal contraction at the same time the economy is contracting and you have a fed monetary policy whose hands are tied. It is a very, very tough situation.” In world news -- Japanese Prime Minister Naoto Kan officially steps down from power. Euronews examines the criticism he faced leading the country after it suffered from the massive earthquake in March. “He is quitting as leader of the ruling Democratic Party, paving the way for the country to choose its sixth premier in five years... His successor faces a mountain of challenges, including rebuilding after the disasters in March and forging a new energy policy. The aftermath of the earthquake and tsunami saw Kan’s approval rating plunged to below 20%.” Still in world news -- an explosion at the UN office in Nigeria kills at least eight people and leaves dozens injured. Al Jazeera looks for a motive. DAN: “Yvonne bring us up to date about what you’ve heard.” YVONNE: “What we’re being told by eye witnesses on the ground is that the entire right wing has been destroyed. They’ve seen bodies... It sounds like total carnage. People begin to ask themselves who is behind this?” Finally in health news -- if waistlines keep expanding, half the U.S. population will be obese by 2030. So says a study at Columbia University. HLN explains the situation “A new study says unhealthy processed foods are to blame. It shows that half a billion adults in the world right now are obese. The study also says that unhealthy food has become more affordable and the authors claim that one of the ways to combat...” Stay with Newsy for more analysis on news throughout the day. For Newsy Now, I’m Jim Flink -- highlighting the top headlines making you smarter, faster.
27 Aug 2011
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