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3:38
Dr. Bruce Blank discusses the symptoms, causes and treatments for heel pain (plantar fasciitis). Podiatry - Martins Ferry, St. Clairsville, OH and Wheeling, WV *******www.achillesfootandanklesurgery**** Plantar fasciitis is the term commonly used to refer to heel and arch pain traced to an inflammation on the bottom of the foot. More specifically, plantar fasciitis is an inflammation of the connective tissue, called plantar fascia, that stretches from the base of the toes, across the arch of the foot, to the point at which it inserts into the heel bone. Overpronation is the most common cause of plantar fasciitis. As the foot rolls inward excessively when walking, it flattens the foot, lengthens the arch, and puts added tension on the plantar fascia. Over time, this causes inflammation. Also known as heel spur syndrome, the condition is often successfully treated with conservative measures, such as the use of anti-inflammatory medications, ice packs, stretching exercises, orthotic devices, and physical therapy. Note: Please consult your physician before taking any medications. In persistent cases, Extracorporeal Shock Wave Treatment (ESWT) may be used to treat the heel pain. Visit our website: *******www.achillesfootandanklesurgery****
7 Apr 2011
106
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1:35
Minnesota Podiatrist Dr. DeBrule explains what a heel spur is.
12 Apr 2011
375
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0:41
Podiatrist Anas Khoury of Northern New Jersey discusses Heel Pain *******www.northeasternfootandankle**** Plantar fasciitis is the term commonly used to refer to heel and arch pain traced to an inflammation on the bottom of the foot. More specifically, plantar fasciitis is an inflammation of the connective tissue, called plantar fascia that stretches from the base of the toes, across the arch of the foot, to the point at which it inserts into the heel bone. Overpronation is the most common cause of plantar fasciitis. As the foot rolls inward excessively when walking, it flattens the foot, lengthens the arch, and puts added tension on the plantar fascia. Over time, this causes inflammation. Also known as heel spur syndrome, the condition is often successfully treated with conservative measures, such as the use of anti-inflammatory medications, ice packs, stretching exercises, orthotic devices, and physical therapy. Note: Please consult your physician before taking any medications. In persistent cases, Extracorporeal Shock Wave Treatment (ESWT) may be used to treat the heel pain. Visit our website: *******www.northeasternfootandankle****
20 Apr 2011
81
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1:24
Podiatrist - Dr. Harvey Jacobs of Somerset New Jersey discusses the symptoms, causes and treatments for heel pain (plantar fasciitis). *******qualityfootcarecenternj**** Heel pain is generally the result of faulty biomechanics (walking gait abnormalities) that place too much stress on the heel bone and the soft tissues that attach to it. The stress may also result from injury, or a bruise incurred while walking, running, or jumping on hard surfaces; wearing poorly constructed footwear; or being overweight. The heel bone is the largest of the 26 bones in the human foot, which also has 33 joints and a network of more than 100 tendons, muscles, and ligaments. Like all bones, it is subject to outside influences that can affect its integrity and its ability to keep us on our feet. Heel pain, sometimes disabling, can occur in the front, back, or bottom of the heel. Heel Spurs A common cause of heel pain is the heel spur, a bony growth on the underside of the heel bone. The spur, visible by X-ray, appears as a protrusion that can extend forward as much as half an inch. When there is no indication of bone enlargement, the condition is sometimes referred to as heel spur syndrome. Heel spurs result from strain on the muscles and ligaments of the foot, by stretching of the long band of tissue that connects the heel and the ball of the foot, and by repeated tearing away of the lining or membrane that covers the heel bone. These conditions may result from biomechanical imbalance, running or jogging, improperly fitted or excessively worn shoes, or obesity. Plantar Fasciitis Both heel pain and heel spurs are frequently associated with an inflammation of the band of fibrous connective tissue (fascia) running along the bottom (plantar surface) of the foot, from the heel to the ball of the foot. The inflammation is called plantar fasciitis. It is common among athletes who run and jump a lot, and it can be quite painful. The condition occurs when the plantar fascia is strained over time beyond its normal extension, causing the soft tissue fibers of the fascia to tear or stretch at points along its length; this leads to inflammation, pain, and possibly the growth of a bone spur where it attaches to the heel bone. The inflammation may be aggravated by shoes that lack appropriate support, especially in the arch area, and by the chronic irritation that sometimes accompanies an athletic lifestyle. Resting provides only temporary relief. When you resume walking, particularly after a night's sleep, you may experience a sudden elongation of the fascia band, which stretches and pulls on the heel. As you walk, the heel pain may lessen or even disappear, but that may be just a false sense of relief. The pain often returns after prolonged rest or extensive walking. Visit our website: *******qualityfootcarecenternj****
28 Apr 2011
190
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4:11
The host of "Pregnant in Heels", Rosie Pope, takes you inside her mommy prep lab and reveals an embarrassing mistake many mothers make.
2 May 2011
1149
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1:33
Heel Pain - Podiatrist in Hudson Valley, Ulster, Orange and Dutchess County, NY Dr. Tracey Toback discusses the symptoms, causes and treatments for heel pain (plantar fasciitis). *******www.tobackpodiatry**** The heel bone (calcaneus) is the largest bone in the foot. This strong bone supports the body's total weight and is responsible for absorbing the daily stress placed on the feet, making it susceptible to various heel pain and disorders. Heel pain is also associated with an important ligament of the foot called the plantar fascia. The plantar fascia is attached to the bottom of the heel and extends up to the toes to create and support the arch of the foot. Should the arch flatten due to stress, the plantar fascia stretches beyond its limit (sometimes tearing or rupturing) and pulls on the heel, causing great discomfort or a condition known as plantar fasciitis. Patients with heel pain often describe the pain as “stepping on a spur or thorn, thus the name heel spur. X-rays are often taken and reveal a bony spur that has formed at the point where the calcaneus attaches to the plantar fascia. Every step becomes a painful experience and surgical intervention is often necessary to remove the spur and alleviate the pain. Additional physical factors that contribute to heel pain include flat feet, high arches, and tight calf muscles. Significant weight gain, high impact athletic activities, and extended periods of walking or standing can also cause heel pain to flare up. Several treatment options are recommended for heel pain, including steroid or cortisone injections, anti-inflammatory medications, heel cups and cushions, and orthotic therapy. Soaking in warm water with Epsom salts provides temporary relief. Your podiatrist may also recommend some exercises to help stretch the calf muscles. In severe cases, surgical removal of the heel spur is the only option. When conservative treatments fail to offer relief, Dr. Toback may perform a procedure called an endoscopic plantar fasciotomy. During this procedure, a small instrument called an arthroscope is inserted into the foot to surgically release the tight tendon where it attaches to the heel bone. Two small incisions are made on either side of the heel. Through one opening, the arthroscope is attached to a small camera to allow the podiatrist to see the inflamed tendon on a TV. Monitor. Through the other opening, small tools are utilized to make a tiny cut in the tendon, thus releasing the tension by allowing the tendon to lengthen, furthermore relieving the tension on the heel spur. The actual heel spur is not removed. Endoscopic surgery is the newest and best course of treatment. The incisions are very small and consequently, there is less invasive work and discomfort. The procedure is performed in an outpatient surgical center and no hospital stay is required. The procedure itself takes about 15 minutes and the patient will begin walking immediately. Minimal loss of work is incurred. Older, traditional methods of heel spur surgery required a large surgical incision across the inner side of the heel and a hospital stay was required. A painful recovery generally lasted 4-6 weeks, making it very difficult to return to work. Endoscopic surgery is truly one of the many great advances made in modern medicine. Visit our website: *******www.tobackpodiatry****
24 May 2011
306
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2:07
Campbell, San Jose, Saratoga and Silicon Valley Podiatry - Heel Pain Treatment Dr. Douglas Robinson discusses the symptoms, causes and treatments for heel pain. *******www.drrobinson**** Plantar fasciitis is the term commonly used to refer to heel and arch pain traced to an inflammation on the bottom of the foot. More specifically, plantar fasciitis is an inflammation of the connective tissue, called plantar fascia, that stretches from the base of the toes, across the arch of the foot, to the point at which it inserts into the heel bone. Overpronation is the most common cause of plantar fasciitis. As the foot rolls inward excessively when walking, it flattens the foot, lengthens the arch, and puts added tension on the plantar fascia. Over time, this causes inflammation. Also known as heel spur syndrome, the condition is often successfully treated with conservative measures, such as the use of anti-inflammatory medications, ice packs, stretching exercises, orthotic devices, and physical therapy. Note: Please consult your physician before taking any medications. In persistent cases, Extracorporeal Shock Wave Treatment (ESWT) may be used to treat the heel pain. Visit our website: *******www.drrobinson****
30 May 2011
170
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4:11
The host of "Pregnant in Heels", Rosie Pope, takes you inside her mommy prep lab and reveals an embarrassing mistake many mothers make.
1 Jun 2011
688
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0:53
HEEL AND ELBOW PROTECTOR REGULAR BLUE PAIR.Heelbo combines a comfortable, snug fit with breathability. It fits so well because the proximal cuff is looser to fit the upper arm or ankle, while the Heel and Elbow Protectors Heelbo Heel and Elbow Protectors. Double layer of foam reduces pressure on boney areas.Kodel Heel and Elbow Protectors - One size fits all Shopping results for heel & elbow protectors Mabis, Heelbo Heel & Elbow Protectors, XX-Large, Beige, 12 Pr/bx Reliamed Heel & Elbow PROTECTOR, Medium Mabis, Heelbo Heel & Elbow Protectors, Small, Yellow, 12 Pr/bx Heel/Elbow Protectors Online store for products such as Heel/Elbow Protectors, Orthopedics, Positioning and all kinds of physical therapy products.Heelbo Heel & Elbow Protectors - Allegro Medical Supplies Heelbo Heel & Elbow Protectors - Get the lowest price on Heelbo Heel & Elbow Protectors, online at AllegroMedical****. Heel and Elbow Protector.Heel Protectors and Elbow Protectors from MBS, Inc.
5 Jun 2011
165
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2:22
The most common cause of heel pain is plantar fasciitis which is commonly referred to as a heel spur. Plantar fascia is a broad band of fibrous tissue which runs along the bottom surface of the foot, from the heel to the toes. Plantar fasciitis is a condition in which the plantar fascia is inflamed. This condition can be very painful and cause a considerable amount of suffering. View *******www.drfoot******/heel%20pain.htm
21 Jun 2011
144
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1:14
Podiatry St. Augustine, FL - Heel Pain Patient discusses the treatment he received for heel pain (plantar fasciitis). *******www.healthparkdocs**** Many conditions can affect the rear part of the foot and ankle. Two common conditions can cause heel and arch pain: plantar fasciitis (an inflammation of a fibrous band of tissue in the bottom of the foot that extends from the heel bone to the toes) and heel spurs (often the result of stress on the muscles and fascia of the foot). There are many causes of heel pain and most cases can be effectively treated without surgery. Extracorporeal Shock Wave Extracorporeal shock wave therapy is used to treat chronic heel pain (plantar fasciitis/heel spur syndrome). During this non-invasive surgical procedure, sonic waves are directed at the area of pain using a device similar to that currently used in non-surgical treatment of kidney stones.Extracorporeal means outside of the body, and refers to this non-invasive surgical procedure in which strong sound waves are directed at the area of heel pain. During the usually brief procedure of about 30 minutes, performed under local anesthesia and/or twilight anesthesia, strong sound waves penetrate the heel area and stimulate a healing response by the body. An overnight hospital stay is not necessary since extracorporeal shock wave therapy is performed on and outpatient basis. This therapy is a safe and effective alternative treatment for heel pain and only requires a very short recovery time, mainly due to the elimination of costly and invasive surgical procedures. Contact us today to receive more information or to discuss the treatment options for extracorporeal shock wave therapy. Visit our website: *******www.healthparkdocs****
21 Jun 2011
117
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2:28
What causes Heel Pain? - Fleming Island and Palm Coast Florida, Florida Podiatry Dr. Tom Winters discusses the symptoms, causes and treatments for heel pain (plantar fasciitis). *******www.healthparkdocs**** Many conditions can affect the rear part of the foot and ankle. Two common conditions can cause heel and arch pain: plantar fasciitis (an inflammation of a fibrous band of tissue in the bottom of the foot that extends from the heel bone to the toes) and heel spurs (often the result of stress on the muscles and fascia of the foot). There are many causes of heel pain and most cases can be effectively treated without surgery. Extracorporeal Shock Wave Extracorporeal shock wave therapy is used to treat chronic heel pain (plantar fasciitis/heel spur syndrome). During this non-invasive surgical procedure, sonic waves are directed at the area of pain using a device similar to that currently used in non-surgical treatment of kidney stones.Extracorporeal means outside of the body, and refers to this non-invasive surgical procedure in which strong sound waves are directed at the area of heel pain. During the usually brief procedure of about 30 minutes, performed under local anesthesia and/or twilight anesthesia, strong sound waves penetrate the heel area and stimulate a healing response by the body. An overnight hospital stay is not necessary since extracorporeal shock wave therapy is performed on and outpatient basis. This therapy is a safe and effective alternative treatment for heel pain and only requires a very short recovery time, mainly due to the elimination of costly and invasive surgical procedures. Contact us today to receive more information or to discuss the treatment options for extracorporeal shock wave therapy. Visit our website: *******www.healthparkdocs****
27 Jun 2011
98
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1:17
Heel Pain Treatment - Podiatrist in Cherry Hill, Voorhees and West Deptford, NJ Foot doctor Amy Herskowitz discusses the symptoms, causes and treatments for heel pain (plantar fasciitis). *******www.sjfootdoctors**** Plantar fasciitis is the term commonly used to refer to heel and arch pain traced to an inflammation on the bottom of the foot. More specifically, plantar fasciitis is an inflammation of the connective tissue, called plantar fascia, that stretches from the base of the toes, across the arch of the foot, to the point at which it inserts into the heel bone. Overpronation is the most common cause of plantar fasciitis. As the foot rolls inward excessively when walking, it flattens the foot, lengthens the arch, and puts added tension on the plantar fascia. Over time, this causes inflammation. Also known as heel spur syndrome, the condition is often successfully treated with conservative measures, such as the use of anti-inflammatory medications, ice packs, stretching exercises, orthotic devices, and physical therapy. Note: Please consult your physician before taking any medications. In persistent cases, Extracorporeal Shock Wave Treatment (ESWT) may be used to treat the heel pain. Visit our website: *******www.sjfootdoctors****
28 Jun 2011
137
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1:33
What causes Heel Pain? - Podiatrist in Pittsburgh and White Oak, PA Patient discusses treatment for heel pain from Dr. Joseph Gioffre. *******drgioffrepodiatrist**** Many conditions can affect the rear part of the foot and ankle. Two common conditions can cause heel and arch pain: plantar fasciitis (an inflammation of a fibrous band of tissue in the bottom of the foot that extends from the heel bone to the toes) and heel spurs (often the result of stress on the muscles and fascia of the foot). There are many causes of heel pain and most cases can be effectively treated without surgery. Visit our website: *******drgioffrepodiatrist**** Extracorporeal Shock Wave Extracorporeal shock wave therapy is used to treat chronic heel pain (plantar fasciitis/heel spur syndrome). During this non-invasive surgical procedure, sonic waves are directed at the area of pain using a device similar to that currently used in non-surgical treatment of kidney stones.Extracorporeal means outside of the body, and refers to this non-invasive surgical procedure in which strong sound waves are directed at the area of heel pain. During the usually brief procedure of about 30 minutes, performed under local anesthesia and/or twilight anesthesia, strong sound waves penetrate the heel area and stimulate a healing response by the body. An overnight hospital stay is not necessary since extracorporeal shock wave therapy is performed on and outpatient basis. This therapy is a safe and effective alternative treatment for heel pain and only requires a very short recovery time, mainly due to the elimination of costly and invasive surgical procedures. Contact us today to receive more information or to discuss the treatment options for extracorporeal shock wave therapy. Visit our website: *******drgioffrepodiatrist****
4 Jul 2011
190
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1:04
Heel Pain Treatment - Podiatrist in Millburn, Livingston and Maplewood, NJ Dr. Howard Hyman discusses the symptoms, causes and treatments for heel pain (plantar fasciitis). *******www.thepodiatrycenter**** Plantar fasciitis (or heel pain) is commonly traced to an inflammation on the bottom of the foot. Our practice can evaluate arch pain, and may prescribe customized shoe inserts called orthoses to help alleviate the pain. Plantar fasciitis is caused by inflammation of the connective tissue that stretches from the base of the toes, across the arch of the foot, to the point at which it inserts into the heel bone. Also called heel spur syndrome, the condition can usually be successfully treated with conservative measures such as use of anti-inflammatory medications and ice packs, stretching exercises, orthotic devices, and physical therapy. Visit our website: *******www.thepodiatrycenter****
5 Jul 2011
133
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0:30
New! Heel Pain, Podiatrist, Podiatry, Therapeutic Foot Doctor, Boca Raton, FL 33486. BocaPodiatryGroup****, 561-750-3060, Childrens Foot Doctor, Cool Laser Treatment, Cool Laser Treatment Center, Foot Doctor, Foot Fungus Doctor, Foot Therapeutic Doctor, Fungus Laser Removal Center, Heel Pain, Kids Foot Doctor, Laser Fungus Toenail Removal, Laser Hair Removal, Plantar Fasciitis, Podiatrist, Spider Vein Removal, Therapeutic Foot Doctor, Urgent Foot Care, Urgent Foot Care Center, Urgent Foot Care Doctor, Boca Raton. Podiatry, 33486, Heel Pain, Florida, SS.
6 Jul 2011
186
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