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www.Kamikazeweb.com present: DVD Series 'All Kata of Shito Ryu', step by step, from all angles of view, with complete bunkai, very professional quality, katas performed by real masters. Vol.1: Heian (Pinan) Shodan, Nidan, Sandan, Yondan, Godan. Vol.2: Naihanchi, Bassai-dai, Seienchin. Vol.3: Kosokun-dai, Kosokun-sho, Shihokosokun, Chinto. Vol.4: Sanchin, Tensho, Seipai, Sochin. Vol.5: Jitte, Jion, Gojushiho, Vol.6: Jyroku, Matsumuraha-rohai, Sesan, Shisochin. Vol.7: Super rinpei, Matsukaze, Jiin. Vol.8: Kururunfa, Saifa, Shinpa You can find the full movie here: http://www.kamikazeweb.com/index.php?action=article_detailed&id=00436&type=cesta
10 Dec 2009
2092
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0:38
hhttp://www.imaginarts.tv présente : DVD de karate shotokan présentant les Bunkaï des 5 Heians et de Tekki Shodan. Vous trouverez dans ce DVD les Bunkaïs des 5 Heians et de Tekki Shodan. Correspondant au nouveau programme fédéral pour la ceinture noire. Jean-Pierre Lavorato, vous propose sa forme de recherche à travers les bunkaïs de façon classique linéaire, circualaire, à 30°, 45°, go, ura, des'axe etc... Jean-Pierre LAVORATO, Ceinture Noire 8ème DAN style Shotokan sensei Kaze, ancien champion de France et d'Europe. Après 44 ans de pratique et de recherche dont 39 passées auprès de "O Senseï Taiji KAZE" en tant qu'élève et assistant, Jean-Pierre Lavorato vous propose sa vision personnelle du Karaté-Do. DVD Series "VISION DU KARATE DO" Shotokan Ryu Kase Ha, J.-P. LAVORATO, PAL, all region, french with subtitles in English and Spanish. After more than 45 years experience Sensei Lavorato, 8th Dan, student and assistant of Sensei Kase shows his personal view of Karate-Do. Vol.4 (75 min.): BUNKAI2: Bunkai of Bassai Dai, Bassai Sho, Kanku Dai, Kanku Sho, Jion, Jiin and Jitte. Bunkai versions Oyo, Go, 45 degrees, aspiration, lineal or mawari ashi
25 Feb 2010
1677
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4:08
The most popular image associated with kata is that of a karate practitioner performing a series of punches and kicks in the air. The kata are executed as a specified series of approximately 20 to 70 moves, generally with stepping and turning, while attempting to maintain perfect form. There are perhaps 100 kata across the various forms of karate, each with many minor variations. The number of moves in a kata may be referred to in the name of the kata, eg. Gojushiho, which means "54 steps." The number of moves may also have links with Buddhist spirituality. The number 108 is significant in Buddhism, and kata with 54, 36, or 27 moves (divisors of 108) are common. The practitioner is generally counselled to visualize the enemy attacks, and his or her responses, as actually occurring, and karateka are often told to "read" a kata, to explain the imagined events. In teaching the open handed kata, most styles of Karate start with a series of three, or sometimes two, very simple kata called blocking forms before advancing to five basic kata named Pinan in some systems and Heian in others. By working through this series (in order: Shodan, Nidan, Sandan, Yondan, Godan (except in Wado Ryu Karate, where Shodan and Nidan are reversed)) the practitioner learns all the basic stances and techniques before moving on to more advanced kata. Traditionally, kata are taught in stages. Previously learned kata are returned to in order to show more advanced techniques or ways of doing things, as beginners do not have the same knowledge and experience that practitioners further up the ranks have. It is not uncommon in some styles for students testing for Shodan (first rank black belt) to have to repeat every kata they have learned from the first belt, but at a "black belt" level, for example, with better technique, power, amongst others. This system is often used for the lower grades as well. The student will perform one new kata and one or two previous ones, to demonstrate how much they have progressed and how quickly they can learn new things.
27 Feb 2010
663
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4:08
The most popular image associated with kata is that of a karate practitioner performing a series of punches and kicks in the air. The kata are executed as a specified series of approximately 20 to 70 moves, generally with stepping and turning, while attempting to maintain perfect form. There are perhaps 100 kata across the various forms of karate, each with many minor variations. The number of moves in a kata may be referred to in the name of the kata, eg. Gojushiho, which means "54 steps." The number of moves may also have links with Buddhist spirituality. The number 108 is significant in Buddhism, and kata with 54, 36, or 27 moves (divisors of 108) are common. The practitioner is generally counselled to visualize the enemy attacks, and his or her responses, as actually occurring, and karateka are often told to "read" a kata, to explain the imagined events. In teaching the open handed kata, most styles of Karate start with a series of three, or sometimes two, very simple kata called blocking forms before advancing to five basic kata named Pinan in some systems and Heian in others. By working through this series (in order: Shodan, Nidan, Sandan, Yondan, Godan (except in Wado Ryu Karate, where Shodan and Nidan are reversed)) the practitioner learns all the basic stances and techniques before moving on to more advanced kata. Traditionally, kata are taught in stages. Previously learned kata are returned to in order to show more advanced techniques or ways of doing things, as beginners do not have the same knowledge and experience that practitioners further up the ranks have. It is not uncommon in some styles for students testing for Shodan (first rank black belt) to have to repeat every kata they have learned from the first belt, but at a "black belt" level, for example, with better technique, power, amongst others. This system is often used for the lower grades as well. The student will perform one new kata and one or two previous ones, to demonstrate how much they have progressed and how quickly they can learn new things.
8 Apr 2010
1691
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3:08
Description Antique Japanese Girl's Day doll set display accessory. Traditional Girl's Day displays will typically include various accessories along with the usual complement of dolls. These accessories are called dougu in Japanese and include ceremonial items such as trays and offering stands as well as practical items such as furniture and tableware. The accessories, like the dolls, are arranged in a specified order on various display tiers. High quality dougu are often very well made with fine craftsmanship and wood joinery and expert lacquerwork possibly decorated with detailed maki-e finish. Please click here to see more Girl's Day doll set accessories and please read below to learn more about Girl's Day. About the Listed Item This antique Girl's Day dresser (tansu) accessory set is made of wood and finished with black lacquer accented with hand-painted gold and red maki-e designs. The small dresser set is in fair to goodcondition with small chips, marks and scratches from handling and a darkened patina of age and dates from the mid Japanese Showa period (1926-1989) or before. Please click here to see a complete list of available new and vintage Girl's Day dolls and accessories! Size: Height of largest chest (tansu): 4.5 inches (11.5 centimeters) Width (across top of largest chest): 4.1 inches (10.5 centimeters) Depth (across top of largest chest): 1.8 inches (4.7 centimeters) Weight of entire set including storage box: 15.1 ounces (430 grams) More about Girl's Day Sometime during the long Japanese Edo period (1600-1868) households with young girls began to set out attractive displays of dolls around the middle of February. The dolls were usually kept on display until March 3rd which eventually came to be known as 'Girls Day' or hina matsuri as it is called in Japanese. This special day is also sometimes referred to as momo no sekku which means 'Festival of the Peach' due to the fact that beautiful pink peach blossoms are often placed among the dolls on display. Girl's Day dolls are nearly always seen wearing the courtly robes of Heian period (794-1185) nobility. And the dolls are frequently arranged on platforms consisting of between 5 and 7 tiers covered with red felt. Though single-tier displays consisting of one male and one female doll are also quite common (especially in cramped modern apartments). Young Japanese girls (such as our little Emily) often enjoy spending hours assembling and arranging their dolls and accessories according to very old rules of display (Internet websites help many modern Japanese parents learn the rules). However, though the dolls may remain on display for many weeks leading up to March 3rd, tradition holds that the dolls must be put away promptly after this date in order to ensure a young girl's future happiness with a home and family of her own. A similar holiday for boys is the May 5th celebration of Boy's Day. In recent times, Boy's Day has come to be known as 'Children's Day.' item code: R1S3-0005581 category code: hinadougumono ship code: G3
20 May 2010
256
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4:09
The most popular image associated with kata is that of a karate practitioner performing a series of punches and kicks in the air. The kata are executed as a specified series of approximately 20 to 70 moves, generally with stepping and turning, while attempting to maintain perfect form. There are perhaps 100 kata across the various forms of karate, each with many minor variations. The number of moves in a kata may be referred to in the name of the kata, eg. Gojushiho, which means "54 steps." The number of moves may also have links with Buddhist spirituality. The number 108 is significant in Buddhism, and kata with 54, 36, or 27 moves (divisors of 108) are common. The practitioner is generally counselled to visualize the enemy attacks, and his or her responses, as actually occurring, and karateka are often told to "read" a kata, to explain the imagined events. In teaching the open handed kata, most styles of Karate start with a series of three, or sometimes two, very simple kata called blocking forms before advancing to five basic kata named Pinan in some systems and Heian in others. By working through this series (in order: Shodan, Nidan, Sandan, Yondan, Godan (except in Wado Ryu Karate, where Shodan and Nidan are reversed)) the practitioner learns all the basic stances and techniques before moving on to more advanced kata. Traditionally, kata are taught in stages. Previously learned kata are returned to in order to show more advanced techniques or ways of doing things, as beginners do not have the same knowledge and experience that practitioners further up the ranks have. It is not uncommon in some styles for students testing for Shodan (first rank black belt) to have to repeat every kata they have learned from the first belt, but at a "black belt" level, for example, with better technique, power, amongst others. This system is often used for the lower grades as well. The student will perform one new kata and one or two previous ones, to demonstrate how much they have progressed and how quickly they can learn new things.
4 Aug 2010
1113
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2:20
Description Antique Japanese Girl's Day doll set display accessory. Traditional Girl's Day displays will typically include various accessories along with the usual complement of dolls. These accessories are called dougu in Japanese and include ceremonial items such as trays and offering stands as well as practical items such as furniture and tableware. The accessories, like the dolls, are arranged in a specified order on various display tiers. High quality dougu are often very well made with fine craftsmanship and wood joinery and expert lacquerwork possibly decorated with detailed maki-e finish. Please click here to see more Girl's Day doll set accessories and please read below to learn more about Girl's Day. About the Listed Item This antique Girl's Day accessory is made of wood and finished with black lacquer accented with hand-painted gold and red maki-e designs. This small lidded trunk is in poor to fair condition with chips, marks and scratches from handling and a darkened patina of age and dates from the mid Japanese Showa period (1926-1989) or before. The trunk body and lid are finished with black lacquer and detailed maki-e gold lacquer designs of a pine tree and flying crane bird. Pines and cranes are auspicious symbols in Japanese culture. This item was originally part of a larger doll set. Please click here to see a complete list of available new and vintage Girl's Day dolls and accessories! Size: Height (including lid): 2.3 inches (6.0 centimeters) Width (across top): 4.7 inches (12.0 centimeters) Depth (across top): 2.0 inches (5.0 centimeters) Weight: 1.7 ounces (49 grams) More about Girl's Day Sometime during the long Japanese Edo period (1600-1868) households with young girls began to set out attractive displays of dolls around the middle of February. The dolls were usually kept on display until March 3rd which eventually came to be known as 'Girls Day' or hina matsuri as it is called in Japanese. This special day is also sometimes referred to as momo no sekku which means 'Festival of the Peach' due to the fact that beautiful pink peach blossoms are often placed among the dolls on display. Girl's Day dolls are nearly always seen wearing the courtly robes of Heian period (794-1185) nobility. And the dolls are frequently arranged on platforms consisting of between 5 and 7 tiers covered with red felt. Though single-tier displays consisting of one male and one female doll are also quite common (especially in cramped modern apartments). Young Japanese girls (such as our little Emily) often enjoy spending hours assembling and arranging their dolls and accessories according to very old rules of display (Internet websites help many modern Japanese parents learn the rules). However, though the dolls may remain on display for many weeks leading up to March 3rd, tradition holds that the dolls must be put away promptly after this date in order to ensure a young girl's future happiness with a home and family of her own. A similar holiday for boys is the May 5th celebration of Boy's Day. In recent times, Boy's Day has come to be known as 'Children's Day.' item code: R5S6-0005659 category code: hinadougumono ship code: L1650
3 Oct 2010
360
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3:41
The most popular image associated with kata is that of a karate practitioner performing a series of punches and kicks in the air. The kata are executed as a specified series of approximately 20 to 70 moves, generally with stepping and turning, while attempting to maintain perfect form. There are perhaps 100 kata across the various forms of karate, each with many minor variations. The number of moves in a kata may be referred to in the name of the kata, eg. Gojushiho, which means "54 steps." The number of moves may also have links with Buddhist spirituality. The number 108 is significant in Buddhism, and kata with 54, 36, or 27 moves (divisors of 108) are common. The practitioner is generally counselled to visualize the enemy attacks, and his or her responses, as actually occurring, and karateka are often told to "read" a kata, to explain the imagined events. In teaching the open handed kata, most styles of Karate start with a series of three, or sometimes two, very simple kata called blocking forms before advancing to five basic kata named Pinan in some systems and Heian in others. By working through this series (in order: Shodan, Nidan, Sandan, Yondan, Godan (except in Wado Ryu Karate, where Shodan and Nidan are reversed)) the practitioner learns all the basic stances and techniques before moving on to more advanced kata. Traditionally, kata are taught in stages. Previously learned kata are returned to in order to show more advanced techniques or ways of doing things, as beginners do not have the same knowledge and experience that practitioners further up the ranks have. It is not uncommon in some styles for students testing for Shodan (first rank black belt) to have to repeat every kata they have learned from the first belt, but at a "black belt" level, for example, with better technique, power, amongst others. This system is often used for the lower grades as well. The student will perform one new kata and one or two previous ones, to demonstrate how much they have progressed and how quickly they can learn new things.
29 Nov 2010
754
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2:18
MY LINKS • Main Channel - http://www.youtube.com/SuperEd86 • 2nd Channel - http://www.youtube.com/iamcrazyeddie • Facebook - http://bit.ly/SuperEd86 • Twitter - http://www.twitter.com/SuperEd86 • Itunes - http://itunes.apple.com/us/album/id391704136?i=391704243&ign-mpt=uo%3D4 Living Legends http://www.legendarymusic.net A ninja or shinobi (忍者 or 忍び?) was a covert agent or mercenary of feudal Japan specializing in unorthodox arts of war. The functions of the ninja included espionage, sabotage, infiltration, and assassination, as well as open combat in certain situations. The ninja, using covert methods of waging war, were contrasted with the samurai, who had strict rules about honor and combat. In his Buke Myōmokushō, military historian Hanawa Hokinoichi writes of the ninja: " They travelled in disguise to other territories to judge the situation of the enemy, they would inveigle their way into the midst of the enemy to discover gaps, and enter enemy castles to set them on fire, and carried out assassinations, arriving in secret." The origin of the ninja is obscure and difficult to determine, but can be surmised to be around the 14th century. However, the antecedents to the Ninja may have existed as early as the Heian and early Kamakura eras. Few written records exist to detail the activities of the ninja. The word shinobi did not exist to describe a ninja-like agent until the 15th century, and it is unlikely that spies and mercenaries prior to this time were seen as a specialized group. In the unrest of the Sengoku period (15th - 17th centuries), mercenaries and spies for hire arose out of the Iga and Kōga regions of Japan, and it is from these clans that much of later knowledge regarding the ninja is inferred. Following the unification of Japan under the Tokugawa shogunate, the ninja descended again into obscurity. However, in the 17th and 18th centuries, manuals such as the Bansenshukai (1676) — often centered around Chinese military philosophy — appeared in significant numbers. These writings revealed an assortment of philosophies, religious beliefs, their application in warfare, as well as the espionage techniques that form the basis of the ninja's art. The word ninjutsu would later come to describe a wide variety of practices related to the ninja. The mysterious nature of the ninja has long captured popular imagination in Japan, and later the rest of the world. Ninjas figure prominently in folklore and legend, and as a result it is often difficult to separate historical fact from myth. Some legendary abilities include invisibility, walking on water, and control over natural elements. The ninja is also prevalent in popular culture, appearing in many forms of entertainment media.
13 May 2012
4059
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2:26
"Kimigayo" (君が代?) is Japan's national anthem. It is also one of the world's shortest national anthems in current use, with a length of 11 measures and 32 characters.[1][2][3] Its lyrics are based on a Waka poem written in the Heian period (794-1185), sung to a melody written in the later Meiji period. The current melody was chosen in 1880, replacing an unpopular melody composed eleven years earlier. Although Kimigayo had long been Japan's de facto national anthem, it was only legally recognized in 1999 with the passage of Law Regarding the National Flag and National Anthem. Japanese Lyrics: 君が代は 千代に八千代に さざれ石の 巌となりて 苔の生すまで English Translation: May your reign Continue for a thousand, eight thousand generations, Until the pebbles Grow into boulders Lush with moss
11 Jan 2013
7516
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4:48
時は西暦800年。場所は日本。"まちゃのまろ"が歌会に行こうと"ゆきのうえ"のもとにやってきたのだが、十二単衣の一色が変わったことに気が付かないのだが... キャスト:サノシュンスケ/清野由佳理 「ヨガの達人ムトゥさん」http://youtu.be/oSsbhrqln84 「長屋のお隣さん」http://youtu.be/8_f69Ztby3c Heian Era's Silly Couple The setting's 800 A.D., Japan. Machanomaro comes to pick up his girlfriend, Yukinoue, to go to a poetry-reading gathering. But he fails to notice that she changed the colors of her under-robes... Voice: Shunsuke Sano / Yukari Seino "The Master Yogi, Mutu-San": http://youtu.be/oSsbhrqln84 "The Scary Neighbor": http://youtu.be/8_f69Ztby3c Peeping Life: http://www.cwfilms.jp/peeping/ Peeping Life FB: https://www.facebook.com/PPL.info Peeping Life Twitter: https://twitter.com/peepinglife_tw
3 May 2013
3930
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6:34
おでかけバカップル Peeping Life Library #01 彼女が新しい服を悩みに悩んで買って彼氏とお出掛けしようとするのだが・・・ キャスト:サノシュンスケ/清野由佳理 Peeping Lifeを自分流に吹き替えてみよう! 本作「バカップル」を使った「なりきりPeepingLife」のサンプル動画はこちら → http://youtu.be/88iuc1MBcL4 「なりきりPeepingLife」の作り方はこちら → http://youtu.be/jfFzC8AS3bI 平安バカップルを観る http://youtu.be/OAVLpoIkfio from "Peeping Life(ピーピング・ライフ)-The Perfect Edition-" Peeping Life: http://www.cwfilms.jp/peeping/ Peeping Life FB: https://www.facebook.com/PPL.info Peeping Life Twitter: https://twitter.com/peepinglife_tw "Silly Couple Going Out" A couple prepares to go out on a date, but they get into an argument... Voice: Shunsuke Sano, Yukari Seino "Heian Era's Silly Couple" http://youtu.be/OAVLpoIkfio "Dating Party Coincidence" http://youtu.be/2poVebTVjU0
22 Aug 2013
4051
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