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how to recognize tanning and skin cancer|skin cancer bumps on face Skin cancer is the most common type of cancer but if you catch it early, it can be easy to treat. Skin cancer actually consists of a group of cancers that look and grow differently. Anyone who spends time in the sun is at risk for skin cancer, regardless of skin color or type. To recognize skin cancer, start by examining your body for any spots, moles, or bumps. Then, look closely at these spots for signs that they may be cancerous. Pay attention to any changes in your skin, and have them evaluated by a healthcare professional. You should speak to your doctor for an official diagnosis. 1 Allow your doctor to examine your body for spots. If you are concerned about certain spots on your body, make an appointment with your doctor. The doctor can then examine the spots more closely. They will look for moles, birthmarks, or spots that could be cancerous.[9] You will need to remove your clothing so the doctor can do the physical exam of your entire body, from head to toe. 2 Let the doctor run tests on any spots, moles, or bumps. The doctor may do a biopsy on any suspicious spots, moles, or bumps. They will take a small sample of the spot and bring it to a lab for testing.[10] The biopsy will allow the doctor to determine if cancerous cells are present, and if so, what type of cancer is present. 3 Get a diagnosis from the doctor. If the doctor confirms you have skin cancer, they will do more tests to determine the stage of the cancer. The doctor will then recommend treatment based on the stage of the cancer.[11] The main form of treatment for skin cancer is surgery to remove the cancerous spot or spots. In some cases where the cancer covers a wide area of your skin, you may also need radiotherapy or chemotherapy
28 Sep 2017
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How to Prevent recurrent head and neck cancer|Squamous Cell Skin Cancer Skin cancer is the most common type of cancer in the U.S., affecting about 3.5 million Americans annually.[1] The two most common types, basal cell and squamous cell carcinomas, are highly curable. Melanoma, the rarer type, is also the most deadly and difficult to treat. All types of skin cancer, particularly squamous cell, are preventable to a great extent by reducing your exposure to ultraviolet (UV) light. 1 Avoid exposure to arsenic. UV radiation is not the only thing that can cause skin diseases such as squamous cell cancer — exposure to toxic or poisonous compounds (such as arsenic) also increases the cancer risk.[10] Arsenic doesn't have to come in contact with the skin, as ingesting it also increases the risk of skin cancers. It's possible to be exposed to arsenic from well water, pesticides, herbicides, insecticides and some medicines (arsenic may have some medicinal value in tiny amounts). People who work in mining and smelting are at greater risk of arsenic exposure. 2 Don't put coal tar on your skin. Another compound that should be avoided because it increases the risk of squamous cell skin cancer is coal tar, which is found in medicinal shampoos and creams meant for treating psoriasis and head lice.[11] Coal tar is a byproduct of coal processing that's a potential carcinogen despite its medicinal uses. Coal tar products can relieve dryness, redness, flaking and itching of skin, but at the cost of increasing cancer risk. Paracetamol (acetaminophen) is a popular coal-tar derived painkiller that should be avoided if you have a history of skin cancer. 3 Be very cautious with industrial chemicals. Other industrial compounds can also raise your risk of squamous cell carcinoma — either by getting them directly on your skin or by inhaling their fumes.[12] Examples include asbestos, benzene, silica, certain mineral oils and paint solvents. If you need to handle these compounds, always we
28 Sep 2017
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How to tanning and skin cancer |melanoma treatment Skin cancer is best defined as the abnormal growth of skin cells, often due to too much sun exposure, but there are other factors to consider also.[1] There are three main types of skin cancer, which are named based on which layer of skin is affected: basal cell carcinoma, squamous cell carcinoma and melanoma. Melanoma is the rarest form, but also the most deadly type because it's most likely to spread to other parts of the body. Checking your skin for unusual changes on a regular basis can help detect cancer in its early stages, which gives you the best chance of successful treatment. 1 Focus on skin most exposed to the sun. Although skin cancer can develop anywhere on the body, it's most likely to occur on areas with the most sun exposure.[2] It's the UV radiation in the sun that damages the DNA of skin cells and makes them mutate into cancer cells. Thus, spend more time checking parts of your body that get the most sun, such as your scalp, face (especially your nose), ears, neck, upper chest, forearms and hands. Look for unusual marks and blemishes on your skin, especially new growths (see below). It's obviously a good idea to not let certain areas get constant sun exposure, but some outdoor jobs make it difficult. If you can't always cover skin up, then apply a strong sunscreen that blocks out UV radiation. Women tend to be more susceptible to skin cancer on their legs and upper arms because they wear skirts, shorts and halter tops. Check your skin for unusual spots while you're naked (just prior to bathing, for example) so you can see as much of your skin as possible. Use a magnifying glass if your eyesight is poor. 2 Determine your risk factors. Some people are more susceptible to skin cancer than others because they have more risk factors. The main risk factors currently identified include: fair skin with freckles, red hair, over-exposure to UV radiation (from the sun or tanning beds), history of serious
28 Sep 2017
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How to Prevent Skin Cancer|ways to reduce skin cancer Skin cancer is the most common form of cancer in the United States. Over 3.5 million new cases of skin cancer are diagnosed annually, and more than 90% of these are directly related to too much sun or UV exposure;[1] however, the good news is that with preventative strategies, as well as with early detection and treatment of any worrisome skin lesions, you greatly increase your chances of preventing skin cancer. 1 Understand that most skin cancers are easily curable.[16] Even though the word "cancer" can strike fear in us the moment we hear it, skin cancer is actually one of the most curable forms of cancer. When caught early, it can oftentimes be removed with no long-term ramifications. The key to curability depends on both the specific type of skin cancer, as well as the time-frame in which it is noticed and excised by a physician. If the skin cancer is either a precursor lesion (a precancerous growth), a "squamous cell carcinoma," or a "basal cell carcinoma," it can most likely be removed and cured. These are types of cancers or pre-cancers that, when caught early, rarely cause long-term consequences. Melanoma, on the other hand, is the most dangerous form of skin cancer. Although it is the least common diagnosis, it is the leading cause of death from skin cancer, and the fastest one to metastasize (spread) to other areas of the body. Fortunately, with early identification, many melanomas can be noticed, excised, and effectively "cured" as well; however, the risk is certainly higher with this subtype and thus of greater concern. 2 Biopsy or excise any worrisome lesions.[17] When you see your doctor and show them your skin lesion, they will evaluate it and may recommend biopsying (taking a sample of) or excising (completely cutting out) any lesions that are potential cancers. If your doctor recommends a biopsy or excision, they will most likely send you to a medical specialist (a dermatologist, who specializ
28 Sep 2017
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How to diabetes and cardiovascular disease Heart disease is an umbrella term that covers a variety of cardiovascular conditions, including blood vessel diseases, coronary artery disease, arrhythmia, congenital heart defects and infections of the heart.[1] Although heart disease is a serious condition, there are some simple steps that you can take to lower your risk of developing heart disease, such as eating a heart healthy diet, staying active, managing stress, and quitting smoking. Some factors are beyond control, but you can help to protect yourself from heart disease by taking charge of the factors that you can control. 1 Lose weight if you are overweight. Carrying extra weight puts a strain on your heart which can cause heart disease later in life. You are at an even higher risk if you carry excess weight around your waist. Strive to maintain a healthy weight to avoid complications of being overweight now or later in life.[13] Check your BMI using the American Heart Association's BMI calculator 2 Exercise for 30 minutes five days per week. Getting 30 minutes of moderate physical activity five days per week will help you to protect yourself from heart disease. Developing good exercise habits from a young age and maintaining those habits for your lifetime will improve your chances of staying in shape and reaping the benefits of exercise for your heart.[14] Aim for five 30 minute moderate exercise sessions five days per week, but keep in mind that you can divide these sessions into smaller ones throughout the day. For example, you could exercise for 15 minutes in the morning and 15 minutes at night, or do three 10 minute sessions spread throughout the day. As an alternative, you can do 25 minutes of vigorous activity three days per week and some kind of moderate to high intensity muscle training twice per week. 3 Manage stress. Stress causes damage to your arteries which may lead to heart disease, so it is important to develop techniques for managing stress.[15
28 Sep 2017
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How to Clean a medications to hold before cardiac cath|cardiac Catheterization Site Cardiac catheterization is a common medical procedure which enables your doctor to examine your heart. A small tube is inserted through a blood vessel in your leg or arm and moved through your body until it reaches your heart. The catheter may be used to check the blood pressure in your heart, put contrast dye into your heart to facilitate taking X-rays, take blood samples, biopsy your heart, or check for structural problems with the chambers or valves. Because it is an invasive procedure, minimizing infection risk before and after the procedure is very important 1 Avoid people who are sick. If you are sick, even with a minor illness like a cold or flu, this burdens your immune system and makes it easier for you to develop complications. If you wake up the morning of your procedure with a fever, cough, drippy nose, or any other symptoms, notify your doctor immediately.[12] Wash your hands after you shake hands with people and before you eat. This will reduce the likelihood that you expose yourself to pathogens carried by others. Don’t go near, hug, or shake hands with people who have the flu or a cold. Avoid being in small confined spaces with lots of people. These are excellent opportunities for pathogen exchange. This may mean not taking public transportation such as the bus or subway. 2 Boost your immune system by managing stress. Stress causes hormonal and physiological changes in your body which, over time, can weaken your immune system. By easing stress and anxiety before the procedure, you can help ensure that your immune system will remain strong. You can reduce stress by: Learning as much as possible about your procedure. Your doctor and the hospital can provide you with information. Many hospitals even have booklets of information that they provide and make freely available online. Ask your doctor or hospital if such information is available. If so, it will help you under
28 Sep 2017
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How to Cope with a Heart Murmur|Cardiovascular System Health A normal, working heart beats at around 100,000 beats each day. Using a stethoscope, your doctor should hear a steady “lub-Dub...lub-Dub” from your heart. A heart murmur refers to abnormal heart sounds that are heard along with a normal heartbeat, such as a faint or loud swishing sound. Heart murmurs are classified into two types: innocent or “harmless” and abnormal. Innocent heart murmurs are not considered serious medical issues, but abnormal heart murmurs must be addressed, treated, and monitored. 1 Understand how your heart works. Your heart consists of four chambers and four valves. The two upper chambers are called atria and the lower chambers are called ventricles. The right atrium collects the non oxygenated blood from the superior and inferior vena cava (two large veins) and pours the blood into the right ventricle through the Tricuspid valve. The right ventricle then pushes the non oxygenated blood to the pulmonary artery where the blood moves into the lungs through the Pulmonary valve. After making this gas exchange, the oxygenated blood returns back to the heart to the left atrium, which then transfers it to the left ventricle through the Mitral valve. The left ventricle then pushes the oxygenated blood to the aorta artery and the blood moves to different body organs through the Aortic valve. 2 Imagine heart valves like doors or gates in your heart. They allow blood to be transferred in only one direction, preventing it from returning backward through any valves. The “lub-Dub” sound comes from the heart valves opening and closing. When the two ventricles squeeze to contract, the Tricuspid and Mitral valves are both closed to allow the blood to enter into the pulmonary and aorta arteries respectively, and not to return back to the atriums. This process is called the “Systole” and is heard as the first “lub” sound in your heart beat. When the two atriums squeeze to contract, the two ventricles
28 Sep 2017
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How to Cope With mitral regurgitation medication|can you live with a leaky heart valve Mitral valve prolapse occurs when the valve that separates the left atrium from the left ventricle bulges into the atrium when it is closed during contraction. This may cause blood to flow back into the atrium, but it does not always. Many people never have symptoms. Not all cases require treatment, but if you think you might have this condition, you should get checked by a doctor to see if you do need treatment 1 Call an ambulance if you could be having a heart attack. Heart attacks can produce similar symptoms to a mitral valve prolapse. Because untreated heart attacks can be fatal, you should call an ambulance at the first suspicion of a heart attack. Heart attack symptoms may include some or all of the following:[2] Chest pain or pressure Pain that radiates to your neck, jaw, or back Nausea Abdominal discomfort Heartburn or indigestion Feeling out of breath, rapid or shallow breathing Sweating Exhaustion Lightheadedness or dizziness 2 Go to the doctor if you have symptoms of mitral valve prolapse. If you have symptoms, they may be slight at first and increase slowly. If the prolapse causes blood to leak back into the atrium (a condition called mitral valve regurgitation), you are more likely to have symptoms. This can increase in the amount of blood in the left atrium, create more pressure in the pulmonary veins, and cause the heart to become enlarged. If your condition is severe, you may have:[3][4] Chest pain An arrhythmic heartbeat A racing heartbeat Difficulty breathing during exercise and when lying flat Exhaustion
28 Sep 2017
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How to Diagnose mitral tricuspid valve regurgitation|Aortic Regurgitation Aortic regurgitation is when the aortic valve (one of your heart valves) becomes weakened, and allows some of the blood to flow back into your heart after having been pumped out into the body. It can be diagnosed by recognizing signs and symptoms, as well as by receiving a series of tests and examinations from your doctor (including a likely referral to a cardiologist — a heart specialist). Fortunately, if aortic regurgitation becomes severe, it can be treated surgically with either a valve repair or a valve replacement, depending upon the extent of damage. 1 Opt for "watchful waiting" and regular echocardiograms.[13] If your aortic regurgitation is not too severe, your doctor or cardiologist may recommend that you do not opt for any procedures (such as surgery), but rather, that you continue to monitor your aortic valve over time and treat it surgically only if that becomes necessary. You will be advised to receive regular echocardiograms to check the status and function of your aortic valve, and it is important that you follow through with these appointments as a decline in function of your aortic valve may not be noticeable to you otherwise. Your doctor may also advise caution with exertion, and avoiding strenuous activities so as not to put undue stress on your heart and your aortic valve. You will likely be advised to continue with moderate physical activity due to the numerous health benefits that this offers., 2 Take medications to prevent worsening of your symptoms.[14] If your blood pressure is high, your doctor will recommend that you take blood pressure medications to lower it back into the normal range. This is because elevated blood pressure is one of the major risk factors for worsening aortic regurgitation. If you are experiencing symptoms of congestive heart failure as a result of your aortic regurgitation, you may receive "ACE inhibitors" and or "diuretics" (two classes of me
28 Sep 2017
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How to Exercise Safely After Angioplasty|coronary artery stent surgery When plaque begins to block blood flow to your heart, you have an increased risk for chest pain, heart attacks and other cardiac events. An angioplasty can help improve the blood flow to the heart. After this procedure, it's essential to begin a heart-healthy lifestyle. Exercising after this procedure is generally an important part of your long-term recovery.[1] Be safe and smart when it comes to the type, amount, and intensity of the exercise you choose. That way, you can allow your body to heal and work to prevent further cardiac issues. 1 Start with a warm-up and end with a cool-down. One essential type and part of your exercise routine is your warm-up and your cool-down. Include both after you've had an angioplasty. Even though a warm-up and a cool-down aren't a specific type of exercise, they are a specific component to safe exercise after any type of cardiac procedure.[11] A warm-up should be about five to 10 minutes long. Choose a very low intensity, low impact exercise that is a slowed-down version of the exercise you will be doing. For example, a slow walk on the treadmill before jogging. The goal of the warm-up is to help your heart rate slowly increase and to get your muscles warm and loose and take them through their full range of motion. A cool-down is very similar to a warm-up. It should also be about five to 10 minutes in length and be a low intensity, slower paced exercise. Again, walking would work. The cool down allows your heart rate and blood pressure return to more normal levels without a quick drop in your activity. 2 Incorporate a 30 minute walk most days. One very safe and frequently recommended exercise is a 30 minute walk. This is a great exercise for most angioplasty patients to start with. Studies have shown that one of the best exercises to start with is walking. Aim for a 30 minute walk most days of the week.[12] If you currently cannot walk for 30 minutes, this
28 Sep 2017
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How to Get a Healthy Heart stop heart disease|coronary heart disease diet plan Having a healthy heart is crucial to your overall health and wellbeing. Having a healthy and active lifestyle can greatly reduce your chances of suffering from heart problems. Maintain a healthy weight, eat right, and watch your blood sugar, blood pressure and cholesterol to promote heart health. 1 Quit smoking. If you smoke, the absolute best thing you can do for your heart is to quit. Smoking can lead to serious heart problems, and it is one of the main causes of coronary heart disease. The impact of quitting is significant. A year after you have stopped, the danger of you suffering a heart attack will drop to about half that of somebody who still smokes. 2 Reduce your alcohol intake. If you drink alcohol, drinking in moderation should not cause problems for your heart health. In fact, people who drink only in moderation may be less likely to have a heart attack than people who drink nothing at all. Drinking a lot, however, will increase your risk of heart problems including raised blood pressure and a heightened risk of suffering a stroke. Moderate drinking is defined by the US Government as no more than one drink a day for women, and two for men. One drink is equivalent to 12 ounces of beer, 5 ounces of wine, or 1 ½ ounces of liquor. Remember that alcohol contributes to wide range of health problems, including increased risk of stroke, raised blood pressure and triglyceride
28 Sep 2017
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How to Lower Resting Heart Rate normal bpm resting|what's a healthy heart beat per Your heart rate, or pulse, is the measurement of heart beats per minute, or how hard the heart is working to circulate blood throughout your body. Your resting heart rate refers to the body's lowest heart rate, when your body is close to absolute rest. Knowing your resting heart rate can help you to assess your overall health and condition and help you set heart rate targets. Lowering your resting heart rate can significantly reduce your risk of heart attacks and strokes. 1 Know your current resting heart rate. Before you start taking action to try to lower your resting heart rate, it's important to know what your starting point is. To do this you just need to take your pulse and count the beats. You can do this at the carotid artery (in the neck) or at the wrist. Be sure that you are resting and relaxed before you start. The best time to do it is before you get out of bed in the morning 2 Take your pulse. To take your pulse at the carotid artery, place your index and middle finger tips lightly on one side of your neck, to the side of your windpipe. Press gently until you find the pulse. To get the most accurate reading, count the number of beats in 60 seconds.[2] Alternatively count the beats in 10 seconds and multiply by six, or 15 seconds and multiply by four. To measure your pulse at the wrist, place one hand palm up. With the other hand, place the tips of your index, middle and ring fingers below the base of your thumb until you feel the pulse. Alternatively, if you have a stethoscope, you can evaluate your resting heart rate with it. Lift up or remove your shirt to expose the bare skin, place the earpieces in your ears, hold the stethoscope against your chest and listen in. Count the number of beats per minute as you listen.
28 Sep 2017
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