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15:44
Radiation includes High-energy electromagnetic waves (x-rays, gamma rays) Particles (alpha particles, beta particles, neutrons) Alpha particles are energetic helium nuclei emitted by some radionuclides with high atomic numbers (eg, plutonium, radium, uranium); they cannot penetrate skin beyond a shallow depth (< 0.1 mm). Beta particles are high-energy electrons that are emitted from the nuclei of unstable atoms (eg, cesium-137, iodine-131). These particles can penetrate more deeply into skin (1 to 2 cm) and cause both epithelial and subepithelial damage. Neutrons are electrically neutral particles emitted by a few radionuclides (eg, californium-252) and produced in nuclear fission reactions (eg, in nuclear reactors); their depth of tissue penetration varies from a few millimeters to several tens of centimeters, depending on their energy. They collide with the nuclei of stable atoms, resulting in emission of energetic protons, alpha and beta particles, and gamma radiation. Gamma radiation and x-rays are electromagnetic radiation (ie, photons) of very short wavelength that can penetrate deeply into tissue (many centimeters). While some photons deposit all their energy in the body, other photons of the same energy may only deposit a fraction of their energy and others may pass completely through the body without interacting. Because of these characteristics, alpha and beta particles cause the most damage when the radioactive atoms that emit them are within the body (internal contamination) or, in the case of beta-emitters, directly on the body; only tissue in close proximity to the radionuclide is affected. Gamma rays and x-rays can cause damage distant from their source and are typically responsible for acute radiation syndromes (ARS—see Radiation Exposure and Contamination : Acute radiation syndromes (ARS)).
21 Jul 2017
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15:44
Radiation exposure may involve Contamination Irradiation Radioactive contamination is the unintended contact with and retention of radioactive material, usually as a dust or liquid. Contamination may be External Internal External contamination is that on skin or clothing, from which some can fall or be rubbed off, contaminating other people and objects. Internal contamination is unintended radioactive material within the body, which it may enter by ingestion, inhalation, or through breaks in the skin. Once in the body, radioactive material may be transported to various sites (eg, bone marrow), where it continues to emit radiation until it is removed or decays. Internal contamination is more difficult to remove. Although internal contamination with any radionuclide is possible, historically, most cases in which contamination posed a significant risk to the patient involved a relatively small number of radionuclides, such as phosphorus-32, cobalt-60, strontium-90, cesium-137, iodine-131, iodine-125, radium-226, uranium-235, uranium-238, plutonium-238, plutonium-239, polonium-210, and americium-241. Irradiation is exposure to radiation but not radioactive material (ie, no contamination is involved). Radiation exposure can occur without the source of radiation (eg, radioactive material, x-ray machine) being in contact with the person. When the source of the radiation is removed or turned off, exposure ends. Irradiation can involve the whole body, which, if the dose is high enough, can result in systemic symptoms and radiation syndromes (see Radiation Exposure and Contamination : Acute radiation syndromes (ARS)), or a small part of the body (eg, from radiation therapy), which can result in local effects. People do not emit radiation (ie, become radioactive) following irradiation.
28 Jul 2017
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Sorafenib is a kinase inhibitor drug for the treatment of primary kidney cancer (advanced renal cell carcinoma), advanced primary liver cancer (hepatocellular carcinoma), and radioactive iodine resistant advanced thyroid carcinoma. Sorafenib 200 mg Alternative Brands • Sorafenat Sorafenib 200 mg Tablets • Soranib Sorafenib 200 mg Tablets Oddway International is a pharmaceutical wholesale company that supplies medicines, other healthcare products and related services to more than 110,000 pharmacies, doctors, health centers and hospitals each year. Our wholesale businesses seek to provide high core service levels to customer in terms of product availability, delivery accuracy, timeliness and reliability at competitive prices. Our objective: to guarantee a reliable and secure worldwide supply of pharmaceuticals at economical price. Contact us today : +91-9873336444
4 Aug 2017
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15:44
Key facts Ionizing radiation is a type of energy released by atoms in the form of electromagnetic waves or particles. People are exposed to natural sources of ionizing radiation, such as in soil, water, and vegetation, as well as in human-made sources, such as x-rays and medical devices. Ionizing radiation has many beneficial applications, including uses in medicine, industry, agriculture and research. As the use of ionizing radiation increases, so does the potential for health hazards if not properly used or contained. Acute health effects such as skin burns or acute radiation syndrome can occur when doses of radiation exceed certain levels. Low doses of ionizing radiation can increase the risk of longer term effects such as cancer. Ionizing radiation is a type of energy released by atoms that travels in the form of electromagnetic waves (gamma or X-rays) or particles (neutrons, beta or alpha). The spontaneous disintegration of atoms is called radioactivity, and the excess energy emitted is a form of ionizing radiation. Unstable elements which disintegrate and emit ionizing radiation are called radionuclides. All radionuclides are uniquely identified by the type of radiation they emit, the energy of the radiation, and their half-life. The activity — used as a measure of the amount of a radionuclide present — is expressed in a unit called the becquerel (Bq): one becquerel is one disintegration per second. The half-life is the time required for the activity of a radionuclide to decrease by decay to half of its initial value. The half-life of a radioactive element is the time that it takes for one half of its atoms to disintegrate. This can range from a mere fraction of a second to millions of years (e.g. iodine-131 has a half-life of 8 days while carbon-14 has a half-life of 5730 years). Radiation sources People are exposed to natural radiation sources as well as human-made sources on a daily basis. Natural radiation comes from many sources including more than
7 Aug 2017
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15:44
Ionizing radiation is a type of energy released by atoms in the form of electromagnetic waves or particles. People are exposed to natural sources of ionizing radiation, such as in soil, water, and vegetation, as well as in human-made sources, such as x-rays and medical devices. Ionizing radiation has many beneficial applications, including uses in medicine, industry, agriculture and research. As the use of ionizing radiation increases, so does the potential for health hazards if not properly used or contained. Acute health effects such as skin burns or acute radiation syndrome can occur when doses of radiation exceed certain levels. Low doses of ionizing radiation can increase the risk of longer term effects such as cancer. Ionizing radiation is a type of energy released by atoms that travels in the form of electromagnetic waves (gamma or X-rays) or particles (neutrons, beta or alpha). The spontaneous disintegration of atoms is called radioactivity, and the excess energy emitted is a form of ionizing radiation. Unstable elements which disintegrate and emit ionizing radiation are called radionuclides. All radionuclides are uniquely identified by the type of radiation they emit, the energy of the radiation, and their half-life. The activity — used as a measure of the amount of a radionuclide present — is expressed in a unit called the becquerel (Bq): one becquerel is one disintegration per second. The half-life is the time required for the activity of a radionuclide to decrease by decay to half of its initial value. The half-life of a radioactive element is the time that it takes for one half of its atoms to disintegrate. This can range from a mere fraction of a second to millions of years (e.g. iodine-131 has a half-life of 8 days while carbon-14 has a half-life of 5730 years).
8 Aug 2017
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Iodine clock reaction experiement.looks cool!
30 Nov 2006
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1:12
The reaction of Aluminum metal and Iodine creates a plume of purple Iodine while creating glowing Aluminum Iodide. A Very interesting reaction.
2 Mar 2007
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4:34
Bob Thompson bypasses the DEA restrictions and shows you how to make iodine with Phil Torrone
6 Nov 2008
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8:43
Natural Health Doctor, Robert DeMaria, discusses the importance of Iodine and why every cell in your body needs it!
17 Jun 2009
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10:00
Natural Health Doctor, Robert DeMaria, discusses the importance of Iodine and why every cell in your body needs it!
17 Jun 2009
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6:16
How much iodine do we need? What are the best sources? What happens when we're deficient? Dr Bud Tarreto talks to us about how iodine affects the body and how iodine can best be used to support total body health.
26 Mar 2010
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1:53
Dr. Stephen Langer explains how iodine complements the thyroid gland and how it affects our overall health. Go to www.ihealthtube**** for more.
18 Jul 2008
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9:08
Unravel the mysteries of the thyroid! What kind of thyroid tests are there? What are good foods to eat that are high in iodine? Get your questions answered!
5 Nov 2009
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2:53
Japanese obtain more than 95% of iodine from seaweeds. Consumption of iodine as an active component protects their nation from degeneration and mental diseases that threaten the Western world. If you remove the seaweed from the Japanese diet, supply of iodine drops by 100 times and can reach the lower level marked in the United States.
14 Nov 2009
67
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8:23
www.NaturalEndocrineSolutions**** If you have Graves' Disease and want to avoid taking anti-thyroid drugs, don't even want to consider receiving radioactive iodine, then you might want to try restoring your health through a natural treatment protocol.
18 Apr 2010
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