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fansite.cl
6 Jul 2007
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6:21
Parte 3
9 Aug 2007
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1:12
é...
7 Jan 2008
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0:16
pelaea parte 2
21 May 2008
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8:05
nenas un video nuestro ^^
28 Dec 2009
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0:23
15 Jun 2011
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1:08:31
lgunas de las jugadas que he realizado.
29 Aug 2016
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1:21
Chevron owns a 28% share in the Yadana natural gas project in Burma (Myanmar). Millions of dollars of revenue from this project go to the country's repressive military junta. This money keeps it in power. Tell Chevron to hold all payments for the true elected government of Burma, and to send humanitarian aid through accredited non-government organizations
16 Oct 2007
1215
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3:25
Uma rotunda está no centro de uma polémica com mais de dez anos. Enquanto os moradores lamentam a "caganita" de rotunda que têm na rua, o presidente da Junta revela o mega-projecto existente que não avança por culpa da oposição. (*******www.cavalheirosdoapocalipse****)
4 Dec 2007
803
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6:46
Antonio Graceffo goes inside of the war zone of Burma, with the Shan State rebel Army. He trains the soldiers in a combination of kali, Muay Thai, and combatives. The soldiers demonstrate Lai Tai, the Kung Fu of the Shan people. shan,state,army,burma,burmese,war,martial,art,odyssey,antonio,graceffo,junta,shanland,rebel
14 Feb 2008
304
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5:51
junta nacional fiat 600 chile buin 2009
24 Mar 2009
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0:27
Speakers highlighted the issues recently Published in some Daily Newspapers, that describes, Burmese authorities is distributing Tanks of ACID, Bundles of Kris, packets of broadsword, to the local Magh, other newly settled wild Buddist community. On the other hand, the regime started the electric fencing along the entire border to the Bangladesh. That imply the Junta has already planned for the complete genocide of Rohingya Muslim Community, which nationality have already been denied since 1982.
3 May 2009
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0:42
Walking into a meeting of European foreign ministers in Brussels, Benita Ferrero-Waldner, European Commissioner for External Relations, says there will not be new additional sanctions for Burma but that the EU will likely call on the Burmese junta to release of dissident Aung San Suu Kyi Distributed by Tubemogul.
19 May 2009
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7:03
Video ilustrado con imágenes fotográficas, que muestran parte de la gestión realizada por la Junta Directiva 2006.
9 Dec 2009
197
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2:45
Initial results from Burma’s election show military incumbents ahead in the polls. Post-election violence is driving 15,000 refugees flee to Thailand’s borders. BBC reports Burma’s minority groups were finally fed up with the political games and fraudulent voting. “Now fighting has returned to the Thai-Burmese border. Between a group that boycotted the vote and briefly occupied a polling station and government Burmese troops ... And it's sent hundreds of Burmese refugees into Thailand to join the hundreds of thousands made homeless by Burma’s ongoing political drama.” The military seized control of the government more than 40 years ago. CBS suggests Burma’s abuse of its minority populations is unprecedented -- and was the final breaking point to the post-election violence. “Both of the main parties in this election are fronts for the military junta that's ruled Myanmar, also known as Burma since 1962. It's led by a general who made sure that whatever the results at the polls he'd still be in charge.” This is not a far cry from the elections held more than 20 years ago where national democratic leader Aung San Suu Kyi emerged to aid in Burma’s steps toward democracy. As ITN notes, the resistance has her and other political leaders walking a tightrope ever since. “In the last election held in the country Suu Kyi’s national lead for democracy won a landslide victory, but the ruling Generals ignored the decision and have kept her locked up at home on and off ever since. She’s one of more than 2,000 political prisoners held by a regime that has been accused of brutal treatment toward ethic minorities.” World super powers are also weighing in. The press was quick to catch President Obama’s reaction during his stay in India this week. Fox News delivered the statements from his last meeting with the press. OBAMA: “The democracies of the world cannot remain silent. It is unacceptable to steal elections. As the regime in Burma has done again, for all the world to see.” Across the pond, European Union officials are not so eager to acknowledge the country’s progress. In an interview with Al Jazeera, EU ambassador David Lipman believes Burma is under their magnifying glass, but sees no immediate changes. REPORTER: “The European Union says it would consider lifting sanctions against the new government if Suu Kyi and more than 2,000 other political prisoners are released.” LIPMAN: “Clearly we will have to wait and see what happens after the elections ... and then we will have to judge the new government’s policies and actions.” Now the aftermath of Burma’s elections is clear. With thousands fleeing the country, do you think the military regime will hold its power?
11 Nov 2010
390
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2:16
Alpha Conde, a long-time opposition leader, was declared the winner of Guinea’s first democratic election in 52 years. The BBC reports, his victory has sparked violent protest in Conakry, the capital of the small west African nation. “Supporters of Cellou Dalein Diallo a former prime minister who came first in the polls a few months ago clashed with security forces on Monday, they warned they would not accept defeat. ‘We cannot accept the results that they proclaimed today. They cheated.’” According to Voice of America, at least 66 people have been injured in post-election violence since the results of the poll were announced late Monday. Though the U.S.-based Carter Center and a European Union election group who monitored the elections said they found no major problems with the election. Diallo said he has evidence of voter fraud across the country and that the police are targeting members of his ethnic group, the Peul. The vote marks the end of decades of rule by dictators and military juntas, but the election has also reawakened ethnic conflict between Guinea’s most populous ethnic groups the Peul, represented by Diallo and the Malinke, represented by Conde. Votes closely followed ethnic lines, and now many Guineas fear the Malinke ethnic group’s government will favor its own while shutting others out as some Guinean presidents have in the past. Others in the business sector worry that Conde’s government will slow the mineral-rich country’s mining operations. Bloomberg reported Tuesday morning New York-based DaMina Advisors L-L-P warned its clients… “Conde’s ambitious populist manifesto calls for drastic increases in tax revenues and a re-write of the country’s mining and hydrocarbons laws... Tensions with miners and local business elites will retard major new investments in iron ore, gold and bauxite.” Despite the simmering conflict and uncertain future, Conde is calling for national unity. The Guardian highlights his interview with Radio France Internationale... where he says... "Time has come to reach out in a spirit of brotherhood to tackle, together and immediately, the numerous challenges the country faces...That will only be possible in a calm atmosphere and with the cooperation of all Guineans." Conde’s victory has yet to be approved by Guinea’s supreme court, but Daillo will likely begin an appeal before then. Get more multi-source world news analysis from Newsy****
18 Nov 2010
185
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