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3:52
In this on-air news segment, a prominent Seattle Divorce Attorney speaks with KCPQ Fox 13 on the recent trend of attorneys using opposing parties' Facebook accounts against them in divorce cases. With Facebook acting as a "gold mine of information" even in a no-fault state such as Washington, imagine how attorneys can use it in cases where fault must be proven. To learn more, please visit www.mollybkenny.com
4 Aug 2010
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2:02
BY ZHENG HWUANG CHIA ANCHOR: JENNY MECKELES You're watching multisource entertainment video news analysis from Newsy. Paris Hilton has certainly been around the block a time or two. Let’s see: Sex-tape - cocaine possession - and - 23 days in prison. Check. TV reality show - perfume line - hair products. Check. And now - Paris can add in -- an iPhone app. Seattle’s KCPQ has the scoop. Anchor: “And now you have an app. Tell us about the Paris app.” Paris: “It’s a new app for your iPad - and your iPod and the iPhone. It’s a lot of fun. There is a feature called the BFF feature where you can take your picture and put it with a picture of me - and it looks like you took a picture with me.” Yep. You plus Paris equals BFF. But how exactly is this relationship forged? Think Photoshop - but faster. TV Squad shows David Letterman checking out the app during his Late Night show on CBS. Paris: “Here we go. Alright. And there you are. Use it. There’s all different kind of poses, and there’s a bunch that you can do. It’s fun.” David: "I wonder what does the boyfriend think about about this shot.” Though Paris’ fans might be happy with the idea of getting up-close with the star - there are many others out there - who are very - and let me say it again - very - upset with the app. “This app almost makes us want to trash our iPhones out of the pure terror that the Paris Hilton app could somehow end up spreading like Hepatitis C... perhaps the full version of One Night in Paris will be available to stream in a later edition?” A writer from tech blog Macgasm chimes in with... “Maybe we should start an Anti-Macgasmic award ceremony for the dumbest iPhone app on the App Store; this would be the first recipient. …If you feel the need to point and laugh at an application, I’d suggest giving this thing a download.” Along with its BFF picture feature- the app also includes ‘Hot or Not’- which allows users to upload their photos to be judged by fellow fans. Android users - don’t worry - a version of the app will be coming your way soon. In the meantime- download the Newsy app- its free- but sorry- no BFF picture feature. Follow Newsy_Videos on Newsy Get more multisource video news analysis from Newsy Transcript by Newsy
22 Feb 2011
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2:23
BY LIZ REED ANCHOR CHRISTINA HARTMAN You're watching multisource health news analysis from Newsy Just as the world breathes a sigh of relief after the H1N1 flu pandemic, researchers say a single mutation could make this flu even more dangerous--and eerily familiar. Reporter: “An older, mid-20th century virus could come roaring back for the northern hemisphere winter. The so-called Asian influenza, a H2N2 strain, first appeared in 1957 and killed one to four million people despite a major vaccination campaign.” Geneva Scientists recently confirmed that H2N2 is circulating among birds and pigs and could easily spread to humans. The biggest concern is, those under 50 have little to no immunity against the killer flu. So why haven’t world governments sounded the alarms? It’s all about vaccine costs. In response to the H1N1 outbreak, many nations stockpiled vaccines at a huge cost, causing some to cry foul. Reporter: “The debate rages over whether pharmaceutical companies deliberately mislead governments about the seriousness of swine flu to make them stockpile vaccines... Agency Worker: "Britain has spent a fortune on preparations.” But a writer for Nature.com suggests failing to prepare for H2N2 could have much higher costs in the long run. “An influenza pandemic is likely to cost far more and create a much greater health burden than a well-planned pre-emptive programme ... The inevitable delay in distributing the vaccine would allow the virus to spread, kill more people and potentially mutate to the point of being able to evade people's immune systems.” But a doctor on KCPQ disagrees and believes flu season will end without controversy. “It has been a very ordinary flu season which means a lot of people get it a lot of people are sick but no more so than previously in previous years. We kind of remember that there was a big outbreak of the 2009 H1N1 swine flu. We have not seen that.” And a blogger for Examiner doubts there’s and ulterior motive behind the call for vaccination, and points out: millions of lives at risk is no laughing matter. “[T]he call to action by vaccine specialists is only a step to help bring into awareness that no disease or virus should be taken lightly, especially if it has existed in the past ... it seems that advanced warnings of these deadly viruses has become a norm...” Researchers claim the H2N2 vaccine from the 60s could still be used alongside standard vaccines as a preventive measure for future outbreaks. Follow Newsy_Videos on Twitter Get more multisource video news anlaysis from Newsy Transcript by Newsy
19 Mar 2011
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1:56
BY CHRISTINE SLUSSER ANCHOR JENNIFER MECKLES You're watching multisource world news analysis from Newsy Rescue workers in the Atlantic are struggling to save tens of thousands of endangered Northern Rockhopper penguins after a ship carrying heavy fuel ran aground and split in two...leaking more than 1600 tons of crude oil into the ocean. “It’s estimated that about 300 penguins have already died, after a cargo ship ran aground and split in half--spilling oil, diesel fuel and soybeans it was carrying, into the sea.” (Video Source: KCPQ) A National Geographic contributor arrived at the small island chain--where he surveyed the damage himself: “There’s an added element of tragedy for the people of Tristan, a population of less than 300, who have always prided themselves in the pollution-free state of their islands. The remaining population has been penned in to prevent them from going back into the sea. This was such a difficult thing to witness, and I hope that I never have to see it again.” CNN reports the massive penguin population, which is estimated at 150,000, accounts for 40% of the world’s total. Experts are expecting the worst. “[A]n oil sheen has surrounded the island chain, which officials say could lead to an environmental disaster.” BBC interviewed a UK charity spokesman--who focused on what the spill means to the small community of people on Nightingale Island, which is part of a British territory. “Another worry for Tristan is the Rock Lobster fishery, and that’s Tristan’s main-stay, it’s what that community runs on, it’s their only export, and we know that the crayfish born in the shallows and it’s a top-end product that’s relies on coming from a clean environment.” The New York Times’ Green blog also points out it isn’t just penguins and people being affected... “Other species have also been oiled, including giant petrels and fur seal pups, though the penguins seem to be the primary victims of the spill.” According to a UK wildlife preservation group, the Northern Rockhopper penguin is one of the world’s most threatened penguin species. Follow Newsy_Videos on Twitter Get more multisource video news analysis from Newsy Transcript by Newsy
9 Apr 2011
253
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2:48
BY ERIK SHUTE AND HARUMENDHAH HELMY You're watching multisource breaking news analysis from Newsy This is Newsy Now and here are the headlines you need to know. In world news — NATO air strikes in Libya continue to fail in shifting the balance of fighting on the ground. France 24 reports, some want NATO to do more. “In Libya itself, the rebels have called for more attacks on Gaddafi’s ground forces. France and the U.K. will be pushing for this Thursday’s NATO conference in Berlin. There’s been calls from politicians on both sides of the Atlantic for the U.S. to make more use of its aircraft, such as the 81 Warthog, which is ideally suited against ground-based targets.” Still in world news — Syrian violence continue to grow, as the country enters its fourth week of civil unrest. Amnesty International says 171 people have died as a result. But Reuters reports, a deal has been struck to restore calm. Authorities have agreed to withdraw the feared secret police, replacing them with army patrols, and to free imprisoned pro-democracy protesters. (Video: Al Jazeera) In U.S. news — Congress is set to vote today on last Friday’s budget compromise. Tucson’s KMSB sums up the stakes. “The president says the budget deal before Congress today is a compromise - to help the government live within its means. But some members of his own party say they'll vote "no" - saying the cuts go too far. And some Republicans say they'll vote "no" too - because the cuts don't go far enough. If - together - all those "no" votes block the deal, congress would be back to square one - facing a shutdown again.” In sports -- Baseball’s all-time home run king is now convicted felon. A jury found Barry Bonds guilty of obstructing a federal investigation. Here’s KCNC. “A federal jury found the former slugger guilty of obstruction of justice but dead locked on three charges that he lied to a grand jury about steroid use. The defense and the prosecution are due back in court in May. Bonds’ lawyers will try and have the conviction tossed. It carries a sentence up to 10 years in prison.” New York Daily News believes Americans lost interest in the trial, saying this case ended as “muddled” as the discussion of steroids in baseball today. Still in sports -- LA Lakers star Kobe Bryant will have to pay up for shouting a homophobic slur at a referee during a game this week. The LGBTQ community had demanded an apology. KCPQ explains Byrant’s consequences. “The NBA commissioner David Stern fined Bryant 100 thousand dollars for using a homophobic slur. Bryant was reacting to a foul called against him. The ref then called a technical foul on Bryant, who later apologized. Bryant says the remark was out of frustration in the heat of the game, and that it shouldn't be taken literally. Civil rights groups are pushing Bryant to issue a more expansive apology.” Stay with Newsy.com for more analysis on news throughout the day. For Newsy Now, I’m Jim Flink -- highlighting the top headlines making you smarter, faster. Follow Newsy_Videos on Twitter Get more multisource video news analysis from Newsy Transcript by Newsy
16 Apr 2011
118
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2:54
BY CHRISTINA HARTMAN You're watching multisource tech news analysis from Newsy. It’s a crowded market that relies on one bit of consumer wisdom: everyone loves a good deal. Now - Facebook’s getting in on the action. KCPQ: “The social networking site is adding a new feature that lets users share their shopping experiences with each other and save money. It's called 'Facebook Deals.' USA Today says the deals will appear on a users’ news feed through ads on a dashboard to the left. From there, you can buy the deal with a credit card, share it or 'like’ it.” The service actually launched in Europe about three months ago. By most accounts - Facebook Deals is going after one rival in particular: Groupon Commercial: “Save the money. Unlock great deals in your town. Groupon.com.” Groupon killer? That’s the word in the blogosphere. ReadWriteWeb’s Marshall Kirkpatrick is already writing the obit. “At least in Europe, Facebook Deals offered deals for free. Free! The giant social network could scale like crazy doing that... It's a Walmart-style move, but Groupon isn't as lovable as the Mom 'n' Pop corner store.” Groupon reaches deal-seekers through a daily email -- Facebook Deals will show up in a users’ newsfeed. KTVU’s Jade Hernandez explains Facebook’s leg up on the competition. “Groupon counts on users to spread the word of a good deal through social media. But Facebook opens this up by using social networking platform. And by partnering with open table and gilt city, both of which specialize in different things, restaurant and high end deals with high end designers, the news is making some people excited about what a rivalry could mean for the consumer.” What it means for the consumer -- suggests All Facebook’s Jackie Cohen -- is market saturation. She asks- how long can the business of daily deals hold up? “So far, statistics have shown that businesses tend to do only one group buying offer to get customers and then never return to these services. That would suggest that this whole market has a very limited shelf life.” But the real headliner -- according to Forbes -- is users can spend Facebook Credits on the deals. Can you say game changer? “Until now people had only been able to use Credits to buy virtual goods for games, as well as for some digital products such as movies. Now people can purchase a voucher to buy a physical product for the first time ... which could move Facebook even further as an e-commerce platform.” That’s all TECHNICALLY true -- though Facebook PR reps contacted ReadWriteWeb to clarify -- users can’t buy “physical goods” with credits -- but rather vouchers redeemable at events. In the end though -- for all the “Groupon killer” talk -- Business Insider’s Pascal-Emmanuel Gobry calls himself a “Groupon bull.” “...actually, building a huge sales and service infrastructure is very hard ... similar to how anyone can start selling stuff online, but becoming Amazon is very hard. … [Facebook Deals’ key to success is] establishing that group buying is really a ‘feature’ that most media sites can replicate and not a ‘company.’” Facebook Deals won’t be offered on mobile apps. It’s making its U.S. debut in only five cities: Atlanta, Austin, Dallas, San Diego and San Francisco. Follow Newsy_Videos on Twitter Get more multisource video news analysis from Newsy Transcript by Newsy
30 Apr 2011
159
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2:13
BY TRACY PFEIFFER ANCHOR CHANCE SEALES You're watching multisource health video news analysis from Newsy. In what’s being called a victory for the Obama administration, an appeals court has lifted a ban on federal funding of human embryonic stem cell research. “This ruling overturns a lower court decision and hands a victory to the White House. Last year, a federal judge granted an injunction against stem cell research, but today’s appeals court ruling vacated that injunction so the way is clear for federal funding when it comes to certain stem cell lines.” (KCPQ) The issue isn’t whether embryonic stem cells should be used for research -- it’s over the whether federal money can be used to fund such research. A writer for The Hill lays out the political jockeying thus far. “President Obama signed an executive [order] shortly after he took office reversing an eight-year moratorium ... adopted under President George W. Bush. But a federal judge struck down the order last summer, saying it violated a 1996 law... The judge had issued an injunction against funding, but the appeals court allowed the Obama policy to remain in place until it ruled.” And while stem cell research is a hot topic in American politics, analysts stress - the actual case is largely over legal interpretation of the law. A writer for The Wall Street Journal explains the appeals court decision. “Writing for the majority, Judge Douglas Ginsburg wrote that the ‘balance of equities tilts against’ enjoining government funding of research involving human embryonic stem cells. ‘The record shows private funding is not generally available for stem cell research,’ the judge noted.” And a reporter for The Iowa Independent adds... “That Congress had chosen to reauthorize the 1996 law protecting embryos while in full knowledge that stem cell research was taking place, according to the court, was proof that Congress hadn’t intended to outlaw such study.” But the appeals court decision isn’t necessarily the end of the road for this case -- MSNBC’s Pete Williams explains, it could go all the way to the U.S. Supreme Court -- though the High Court might be reluctant to take it up. PETE WILLIAMS, NBC NEWS, WASHINGTON, D.C.:“I don’t know that the Supreme Court wants to get involved in this. The legal issue is a relatively sort of mundane legal issue on the standards for granting review and interpreting a federal statute, so there’s no big Constitutional question here involved, but sometimes on these rather dry legal questions, some very important things hinge.” 'Like Newsy' on Facebook for updates in your feed. Get more multisource health video news analysis from Newsy. Transcript by Newsy.
3 May 2011
189
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2:33
BY NICK ADAMS President Obama is looking to imposing tougher sanctions on Iran-- That’s after evidence suggested the nation was involved in an alleged assassination attempt of the Saudi Arabian ambassador to the U.S. KSAZ says the president isn’t going to take it easy on Iran. “President Obama says Iran is going to pay a price for its involvement in a plot to kill the Saudi Arabian ambassador to the United States. The President says the county must be held accountable for its involvement with a terrorist plot.” The administration is considering ways to hit the Iranian economy. KCPQ reports -- the idea on the table now is taking fiscal sanctions against the Bank of Iran. “The Obama Administration says it is actively considering sanctions against the bank for the alleged terror plot by the Iran government. The U.S. Treasury Department says it might make the move if other countries could be persuaded to do the same.” But are tougher sanctions the right answer? Waleed Pharis, a Middle East terrorism analyst, suggests other possible tactics on Fox News. “Most importantly, is that the game changer in Iran isn’t going to be additional sanctions that are needed, but the game changer is going to be to partner with the opposition. To create conditions for an Iranian Spring -- that’s the long term effort we need to have.” But with all the talk about punishment, the question remains -- was the Iranian government really involved in the plot? President Obama says he has enough evidence. But the head of the Iranian Parliament’s National Security Commission says it’s a baseless accusation. Fars News Agency has his comments. “Given the chaotic conditions and the Wall Street protests in the US... they (US authorities) badly needed to create a false atmosphere to change the climate and divert the public opinion in the US and the international community.” Add to that -- a Persian Gulf analyst tells Al-Jazeera, it simply doesn’t make sense for Iran to be involved. “The history of doing it by blowing up a restaurant in Washington doesn’t fit because that could invite, theoretically from the Iranian standpoint, U.S. military retaliation which the Supreme Leader clearly doesn’t want.” A scholar at Columbia University’s Middle East Institute writes on his blog-- Iran has plenty of reasons to be upset at the U.S. and Saudi Arabia -- but Iran has never done something like this before. He says the U.S. should be careful about retaliating. “...at a minimum both the public and the Congress should demand more detailed evidence before taking any rash or irreversible action.” Reuters reports if the U.S. has the proof of the alleged ‘murder plot,’ it can win over the support of the U.N. Security Council to push actions against Iran.
16 Oct 2011
189
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15:25
M.J. McDermott is speaking about the current state of math education, as a private citizen . KCPQ does not endorse this video. Math Education: An Inconvenient Truth
21 May 2009
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