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Dear friends in this video we are going to discuss about how to remove kidney stones without surgery with herbal supplements
3 Apr 2017
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UT Clear capsules are the best natural ways to cleanse kidneys and flush out toxins from body without any kind of side effects.
3 Apr 2017
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Balanced Health Today Call Now 1(888)277-4980 What are the kidneys and what do they do? The kidneys are two bean-shaped organs, each about the size of a fist. They are located just below the rib cage, one on each side of the spine. Every day, the two kidneys filter about 120 to 150 quarts of blood to produce about 1 to 2 quarts of urine, composed of wastes and extra fluid. The urine flows from the kidneys to the bladder through two thin tubes of muscle called ureters, one on each side of the bladder. The bladder stores urine. The muscles of the bladder wall remain relaxed while the bladder fills with urine. As the bladder fills to capacity, signals sent to the brain tell a person to find a toilet soon. When the bladder empties, urine flows out of the body through a tube called the urethra, located at the bottom of the bladder. In men the urethra is long, while in women it is short. Why are the kidneys important? The kidneys are important because they keep the composition, or makeup, of the blood stable, which lets the body function. They prevent the buildup of wastes and extra fluid in the body keep levels of electrolytes stable, such as sodium, potassium, and phosphate make hormones that help regulate blood pressure make red blood cells bones stay strong How do the kidneys work? The kidney is not one large filter. Each kidney is made up of about a million filtering units called nephrons. Each nephron filters a small amount of blood. The nephron includes a filter, called the glomerulus, and a tubule. The nephrons work through a two-step process. The glomerulus lets fluid and waste products pass through it; however, it prevents blood cells and large molecules, mostly proteins, from passing. The filtered fluid then passes through the tubule, which sends needed minerals back to the bloodstream and removes wastes. The final product becomes urine.
15 Apr 2017
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Balanced Health Today Call Now 1(888)277-4980 Your kidneys aren’t very big each is about the size of your fist but they do important work. They keep you healthy by maintaining just the right balance of water and other substances inside your body. Unfortunately, if your kidneys start to malfunction, you might not realize it for a long while. Kidney disease usually doesn’t make you feel sick until the problem becomes serious and irreversible. March is National Kidney Month, a perfect time to learn more about how to keep your kidneys healthy and how to catch problems early. Your kidneys are 2 reddish, bean-shaped organs located on either side of your spine in the middle of your back. Their main job is to filter your blood. Each kidney contains about a million tiny filters that can process around 40 gallons of fluid every day about enough to fill a house’s hot water heater. When blood passes through the kidney, the filters sift and hold onto the substances your body might need, such as certain nutrients and much of the water. Harmful wastes and extra water and nutrients are routed to the nearby bladder and flushed away as urine. Your kidneys also produce several hormones. These hormones help to control your blood pressure, make red blood cells and activate vitamin D, which keeps your bones strong. We all lose a little of our kidney function as we get older. People can even survive with just one kidney if they donate the other to a friend or family member. But when kidney function drops because of an underlying kidney disease, it’s something to be concerned about. Toxins and extra water can build up in your blood. Falling hormone production can cause other problems. About 1 in 10 adults nationwide, or about 20 million people, have at least some signs of kidney damage. There are different types of kidney disease. Most strike both kidneys at the same time, harming the tiny filters called nephrons and reducing their filtering ability. When damage to nephrons
16 Apr 2017
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Balanced Health Today Call Now 1(888)277-4980 The two main causes of chronic kidney disease are diabetes and high blood pressure, which are responsible for up to two-thirds of the cases. Diabetes happens when your blood sugar is too high, causing damage to many organs in your body, including the kidneys and heart, as well as blood vessels, nerves and eyes. High blood pressure, or hypertension, occurs when the pressure of your blood against the walls of your blood vessels increases. If uncontrolled, or poorly controlled, high blood pressure can be a leading cause of heart attacks, strokes and chronic kidney disease. Also, chronic kidney disease can cause high blood pressure. Other conditions that affect the kidneys are: * Glomerulonephritis, a group of diseases that cause inflammation and damage to the kidney's filtering units. These disorders are the third most common type of kidney disease. * Inherited diseases, such as polycystic kidney disease, which causes large cysts to form in the kidneys and damage the surrounding tissue. * Malformations that occur as a baby develops in its mother's womb. For example, a narrowing may occur that prevents normal outflow of urine and causes urine to flow back up to the kidney. This causes infections and may damage the kidneys. * Lupus and other diseases that affect the body's immune system. * Obstructions caused by problems like kidney stones, tumors or an enlarged prostate gland in men. * Repeated urinary infections.
17 Apr 2017
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Balanced Health Today Call Now 1(888)277-4980 Chronic kidney failure, as opposed to acute kidney failure, is a slow and gradually progressive disease. Even if one kidney stops functioning, the other can carry out normal functions. It is not usually until the disease is fairly well advanced and the condition has become severe that signs and symptoms are noticeable; by which time most of the damage is irreversible. It is important that people who are at high risk of developing kidney disease have their kidney functions regularly checked. Early detection can significantly help prevent serious kidney damage. The most common signs and symptoms of chronic kidney disease include: anemia blood in urine dark urine decreased mental alertness decreased urine output edema - swollen feet, hands, and ankles face if edema is severe fatigue tiredness hypertension (high blood pressure insomnia itchy skin, can become persistent loss of appetite male inability to get or maintain an erection erectile dysfunction more frequent urination, especially at night muscle cramps muscle twitches nausea pain on the side or mid to lower back panting shortness of breath protein in urine sudden change in bodyweight unexplained headaches
19 Apr 2017
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Balanced Health Today Call Now 1(888)277-4980 Kidneys carry out the complex system of filtration in our bodies - excess waste and fluid material are removed from the blood and excreted from the body. In most cases, kidneys can eliminate most waste materials that our body produces. However, if the blood flow to the kidneys is affected, they are not working properly because of damage or disease, or if urine outflow is obstructed, problems can occur. In the majority of cases, progressive kidney damage is the result of a chronic disease a long-term disease, such as: Diabetes - chronic kidney disease is linked to diabetes types 1 and 2. If the patient's diabetes is not well controlled, excess sugar glucose can accumulate in the blood. Kidney disease is not common during the first 10 years of diabetes; it more commonly occurs 15-25 years after diagnosis of diabetes. Hypertension high blood pressure - high blood pressure can damage the glomeruli - parts of the kidney involved in filtering waste products. Obstructed urine flow - if urine flow is blocked it can back up into the kidney from the bladder vesicoureteral reflux. Blocked urine flow increases pressure on the kidneys and undermines their function. Possible causes include an enlarged prostate, kidney stones, or a tumor. Kidney diseases - including polycystic kidney disease, pyelonephritis, or glomerulonephritis. Kidney artery stenosis - the renal artery narrows or is blocked before it enters the kidney. Certain toxins - including fuels, solvents such as carbon tetrachloride, and lead and lead-based paint, pipes, and soldering materials. Even some types of jewelry have toxins, which can lead to chronic kidney failure. Fetal developmental problem - if the kidneys do not develop properly in the unborn baby while it is developing in the womb. Systemic lupus erythematosis - an autoimmune disease. The body's own immune system attacks the kidneys as though they were foreign tissue.
20 Apr 2017
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Balanced Health Today Call Now 1(888)277-4980 There is no current cure for chronic kidney disease. However, some therapies can help control the signs and symptoms, reduce the risk of complications, and slow the progression of the disease. Patients with chronic kidney disease typically need to take a large number of medications. Treatments include: Anemia treatment Hemoglobin is the substance in red blood cells that carries vital oxygen around the body. If hemoglobin levels are low, the patient has anemia. Some kidney disease patients with anemia will require blood transfusions. A patient with kidney disease will usually have to take iron supplements, either in the form of daily ferrous sulphate tablets, or occasionally in the form of injections. Phosphate balance People with kidney disease may not be able to eliminate phosphate from their body properly. Patients will be advised to reduce their nutritional phosphate intake - this usually means reducing consumption of dairy products, red meat, eggs, and fish. Vitamin D Patients with kidney disease typically have low levels of vitamin D. Vitamin D is essential for healthy bones. The vitamin D we obtain from the sun or from food has to be activated by the kidneys before the body can use it. Patients may be given alfacalcidol, or calcitriol. High blood pressure High blood pressure is a common problem for patients with chronic kidney disease. It is important to bring the blood pressure down to protect the kidneys, and subsequently slow down the progression of the disease. Fluid retention People with chronic kidney disease need to be careful with their fluid intake. Most patients will be asked to restrict their fluid intake. If the kidneys do not work properly, the patient is much more susceptible to fluid build-up. Skin itching Antihistamines, such as chlorphenamine, may help alleviate symptoms of itching. Anti-sickness medications If toxins build up in the body because the kidneys don't work properly, patients
23 Apr 2017
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Balanced Health Today Call Now 1(888)277-4980 A doctor will check for signs and ask the patient about symptoms. The following tests may also be ordered: Blood test - a blood test may be ordered to determine whether waste substances are being adequately filtered out. If levels of urea and creatinine are persistently high, the doctor will most likely diagnose end-stage kidney disease. Urine test - a urine test helps find out whether there is either blood or protein in the urine. Kidney scans - kidney scans may include a magnetic resonance imaging MRI scan, computed tomography CT scan, or an ultrasound scan. The aim is to determine whether there are any blockages in the urine flow. These scans can also reveal the size and shape of the kidneys - in advanced stages of kidney disease the kidneys are smaller and have an uneven shape. Kidney biopsy - a small sample of kidney tissue is extracted and examined for cell damage. An analysis of kidney tissue makes it easier to make a precise diagnosis of kidney disease. Chest X-ray - the aim here is to check for pulmonary edema fluid retained in the lungs. Glomerular filtration rate GFR - GFR is a test that measures the glomerular filtration rate - it compares the levels of waste products in the patient's blood and urine. GFR measures how many milliliters of waste the kidneys can filter per minute. The kidneys of healthy individuals can typically filter over 90 ml per minute. Changes in the GFR rate can assess how advanced the kidney disease is. In the UK, and many other countries, kidney disease stages are classified as follows: Stage 1 - GFR rate is normal. However, evidence of kidney disease has been detected. Stage 2 - GFR rate is lower than 90 milliliters, and evidence of kidney disease has been detected. Stage 3 - GFR rate is lower than 60 milliliters, regardless of whether evidence of kidney disease has been detected. Stage 4 - GRF rate is lower than 30 milliliters, regardless of whether evidence of kidney disease
25 Apr 2017
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Balanced Health Today Call Now 1(888)277-4980 The following conditions or situations are linked to a higher risk of developing kidney disease: a family history of kidney disease age - chronic kidney disease is much more common among people over 60 atherosclerosis bladder obstruction chronic glomerulonephritis congenital kidney disease kidney disease which is present at birth diabetes - one of the most common risk factors hypertension lupus erythematosis overexposure to some toxins sickle cell disease some medications Complications of chronic kidney disease If the chronic kidney disease progresses to kidney failure, the following complications are possible: anemia central nervous system damage dry skin - or skin color changes fluid retention hyperkalemia - blood potassium levels rise, which can result in heart damage insomnia lower sex drive male erectile dysfunction ostemalacia - bones become weak and break easily pecarditis - the sac-like membrane that envelops the heart (pericardium) becomes inflamed stomach ulcers weak immune system
28 Apr 2017
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Balanced Health Today Call Now 1(888)277-4980 Bacterial diseases include any type of illness caused by bacteria. Bacteria are a type of microorganism, which are tiny forms of life that can only be seen with a microscope. Other types of microorganisms include viruses, some fungi, and some parasites. Millions of bacteria normally live on the skin, in the intestines, and on the genitalia. The vast majority of bacteria do not cause disease, and many bacteria are actually helpful and even necessary for good health. These bacteria are sometimes referred to as “good bacteria” or “healthy bacteria.” Harmful bacteria that cause bacterial infections and disease are called pathogenic bacteria. Bacterial diseases occur when pathogenic bacteria get into the body and begin to reproduce and crowd out healthy bacteria, or to grow in tissues that are normally sterile. Harmful bacteria may also emit toxins that damage the body. Common pathogenic bacteria and the types of bacterial diseases they cause include: * Escherichia coli and Salmonella cause food poisoning. * Helicobacter pylori cause gastritis and ulcers. * Neisseria meningitidis causes meningitis. * Staphylococcus aureus causes a variety of infections in the body, including boils, cellulitis, abscesses, wound infections, toxic shock syndrome, pneumonia, and food poisoning. * Streptococcal bacteria cause a variety of infections in the body, including pneumonia, meningitis, ear infections, and strep throat. Bacterial diseases are contagious and can result in many serious or life-threatening complications, such as blood poisoning (bacteremia), kidney failure, and toxic shock syndrome.
31 Mar 2017
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Balanced Health Today Call Now 1(888)277-4980 Lead can affect almost every organ and system in your body. Children six years old and younger are most susceptible to the effects of lead. Children Even low levels of lead in the blood of children can result in: * Behavior and learning problems * Lower IQ and Hyperactivity * Slowed growth * Hearing Problems * Anemia In rare cases, ingestion of lead can cause seizures, coma and even death. Pregnant Women Lead can accumulate in our bodies over time, where it is stored in bones along with calcium. During pregnancy, lead is released from bones as maternal calcium and is used to help form the bones of the fetus. This is particularly true if a woman does not have enough dietary calcium. Lead can also cross the placental barrier exposing the fetus the lead. This can result in serious effects to the mother and her developing fetus, including: * Reduced growth of the fetus * Premature birth Other Adults Lead is also harmful to other adults. Adults exposed to lead can suffer from: * Cardiovascular effects, increased blood pressure and incidence of hypertension * Decreased kidney function * Reproductive problems (in both men and women)
3 Apr 2017
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15:28
Balanced Health Today Call Now 1(888)277-4980 A lymph node is a small, round or bean-shaped cluster of cells covered by a capsule of connective tissue. The cells are a combination of lymphocytes which produce protein particles that capture invaders, such as viruses and macrophages, which break down the captured material. Lymphocytes and macrophages filter your lymphatic fluid as it travels through your body and protect you by destroying invaders. Lymph nodes are located in groups, and each group drains a specific area of your body. You may be more likely to notice swelling in certain areas, such as in the lymph nodes in your neck, under your chin, in your armpits and in your groin. The site of the swollen lymph nodes may help identify the underlying cause. The most common cause of swollen lymph nodes is an infection, particularly a viral infection, such as the common cold. Other possible causes of swollen lymph nodes include: Common infections * Strep throat * Measles * Ear infections * Infected (abscessed) tooth * Mononucleosis * Skin or wound infections, such as cellulitis * Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) — the virus that causes AIDS Uncommon infections * Tuberculosis * Syphilis * Toxoplasmosis — a parasitic infection resulting from contact with the feces of an infected cat or eating undercooked meat * Cat scratch fever — a bacterial infection from a cat scratch or bite Immune system disorders * Lupus — a chronic inflammatory disease that can target your joints, skin, kidneys, blood cells, heart and lungs * Rheumatoid arthritis — a chronic inflammatory disease that targets the tissue that lines your joints (synovium) Cancers * Lymphoma — cancer that originates in your lymphatic system * Leukemia — cancer of your body's blood-forming tissue, including your bone marrow and lymphatic system * Other cancers that have spread (metastasized ) to lymph nodes Other possible but rare causes include certain medications, such as the anti-seizure medication
9 Apr 2017
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Balanced Health Today Call Now 1(888)277-4980 Toxins are poisonous compounds produced by living organisms; sometimes the term “biotoxin” is used to emphasize the biological origin of these compounds. Man-made chemical compounds with toxic potential are more properly called toxicants. Toxins and toxicants can exert their detrimental effects on health in a number of ways. Some broadly act as mutagens or carcinogens (causing DNA damage or mutations, which can lead to cancer), others can disrupt specific metabolic pathways which can lead to dysfunction of particular biological systems such as the nervous system, liver, or kidneys. The diet is a major source of toxin exposure. Toxins can find their way into the diet by several routes, notably contamination by microorganisms, man-made toxicants including pesticides, residues from food processing, prescription drugs and industrial wastes) or less frequently, contamination by toxins from other “non-food” plant sources. Some of the toxic heavy metals lead, mercury, cadmium, chromium, while not “man-made,” have been released/redistributed into the environment at potentially dangerous levels by man, and can find their way into the diet as well. Microbial toxins, secreted by bacteria and fungi, can be ingested along with contaminated or improperly prepared food. Even the method of food preparation has the potential for converting naturally-occurring food constituents into toxins. For instance, high temperatures can convert nitrogen-containing compounds in meats and cereal products into the potent mutagens benzopyrene and acrylamide, respectively. Smoked fish and cheeses contain precursors to toxins called N-nitroso compounds NOCs, which become mutagenic when metabolized by colonic bacteria. Outside of the diet, respiratory exposure to volatile organic compounds VOCs is a common risk which has been associated with several adverse health effects, including kidney damage, immunological problems, hormonal imbalances,
9 Apr 2017
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Balanced Health Today Call Now 1(888)277-4980 Symptoms of bacterial diseases vary depending on the type of bacterial infection, the area of the body that is infected, and other factors, such as the patient’s age and health history. The symptoms of bacterial diseases can also resemble symptoms of other diseases, such as colitis, influenza, and viral infections. The classic symptom of a bacterial infection is a fever, although not all people with a bacterial infection will have a fever. Bacterial disease symptoms can include: * Bloody urine and painful, frequent urination * Diarrhea * Flu-like symptoms (fatigue, fever, sore throat, headache, cough, aches and pains) * Irritability * Nausea and vomiting * Pain such as joint, ear or abdominal pain * Rashes, lesions and abscesses * tiff neck * Weakness In infants, signs of a bacterial disease can also include: * Bulging of the soft spot on the top of the head * Difficulty with feeding * Excessive crying or fussiness * Excessive sleepiness Serious symptoms that might indicate a life-threatening condition In some cases, bacterial diseases can result in serious or life-threatening complications, such as sepsis or kidney failure. Seek immediate medical care (call 911) if you, or someone you are with, have any of the following symptoms: * Confusion or delirium * Deep, wet chest cough that produces yellow, green or brownish phlegm * Difficulty breathing, wheezing or shortness of breath * High fever (higher than 101 degrees) * Inappropriate change in alertness or level of consciousness * Infants: sunken fontanel (soft spot) on the top of the head, lethargy, no tears with crying, and few or no wet diapers * Lethargy or unresponsiveness * Not urinating or urinating small amounts of tea-colored urine * Seizure
11 Apr 2017
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Balanced Health Today Call Now 1(888)277-4980 Today, probably more than any time in the history of man we are exposed to an incredible plethora of toxic elements. Heavy metals such as mercury, lead, cadmium, and aluminum, are in our food, water, atmosphere, vaccines, and especially our dental fillings. Pesticides, herbicides, fungicides, antibiotics, and hormones are in most of the food we eat, unless you eat organic. Processed foods are full of preservatives and other chemicals which if consumed non-diluted would most certainly be fatal. Finally, many of the containers we routinely use are full of chemicals that can leach into the foodstuffs they are designed to hold. All in all, regardless of how things appear, we live in a toxic soup. Below I have outlined a 5 step detox process. Each step will be explained in detail: Remove external and internal sources amalgam fillings of toxic exposure. Mobilize sequestered toxic metal out of the cells and into your blood. Chelate (bind up) these mobilized toxic metals in your bloodstream. Re-mineralize the blood. Support the effected detoxifying organs-Thyroid, Liver, and Kidneys
13 Apr 2017
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