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Japanese exciting TV serial
20 Aug 2010
3630
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5:51
Atlanta artist Corey Barksdale has created a video about the life of famous Blues musician BB King. At the beginning of the video Corey Barksdale sketches a portrait of BB King using a ball point pen and sharpie marker. As a painter, Corey Barksdale explores the artistic landscape inspired by the music of jazz greats like Miles Davis, John Coltrane and Charlie Parker. The result is a stunning collection of paintings that celebrate the jazz experience. Atlanta, GA (PRWEB) February 5, 2005 -- As a painter, Corey Barksdale's work is continually inspired by jazz. "It frees me to do what I feel when I'm painting," Barksdale says. When he's in the studio creating, he often listens to jazz greats like Charlie Parker, Miles Davis and John Coltrane. The result is a stunning collection of more than 30 paintings that celebrate the jazz experience. B. B. King arrived in Memphis for the first time in 1946 to work as a musician, but after a few months of hardship he left, going back to Mississippi. There he decided to prepare himself better for the next visit and returned to Memphis two years later. Initially he worked at the local R&B radio channel WDIA as a singer. In 1949, he began recording songs under contract with Los Angeles-based RPM Records. Many of King's early recordings were produced by Sam Phillips, who later founded Sun Records. King was also a disc jockey in Memphis, where he gained the nickname "Beale Street Blues Boy", later shortened to "B. B." Before his RPM contract, B. B. had debuted on Bullet Records by issuing the single "Miss Martha King" (1949), which got a bad review in Billboard magazine and did not chart well. In the 1950s, B. B. King became one of the most important names in R&B music, amassing an impressive list of hits including "You Know I Love You," "Woke Up This Morning," "Please Love Me," "When My Heart Beats like a Hammer," "Whole Lotta Love," "You Upset Me Baby," "Every Day I Have the Blues," "Sneakin' Around," "Ten Long Years," "Bad Luck," "Sweet Little Angel," "On My Word of Honor," and "Please Accept My Love." In 1962,B.B. King signed to ABC-Paramount Records, which was later absorbed into MCA Records, and then his current label, Geffen Records. In November 1964, King recorded the Live at the Regal album at the Regal Theater in Chicago, Illinois. B. B. King in concert in France (1989) B. B. King in concert in France (1989) King's first success outside the blues market was his 1969 remake of Roy Hawkins' tune "The Thrill Is Gone." King's version became a hit on both pop and R&B charts, which was rare for an R&B artist. It also gained the number 193 spot in Rolling Stone's Top 500 Songs Of All Time. He gained further rock visibility as an opening act on The Rolling Stones much-ballyhooed 1969 American Tour. King's mainstream success continued throughout the 1970s with songs like "To Know You Is to Love You" and "I Like to Live the Love." [edit] Going mainstream The 1980s, 1990s and 2000s saw King recording less and less. Yet throughout this time he maintained a highly visible and active career, appearing on numerous television shows and performing 300 nights a year. In 1988 King reached a new generation of fans with the single "When Love Comes To Town," a collaborative effort between King and the Irish band U2 (on their Rattle and Hum album). In 2000, King teamed up with guitarist Eric Clapton to record Riding With the King. In 1998 B. B. King appeared in "The Blues Brothers 2000" playing the part of the lead singer of the Louisiana Gator Boys, along with Eric Clapton, Dr. John, Koko Taylor, and Bo Diddley. In 2003, King shared the stage with the rock band Phish in New Jersey, performing three of his classics and jamming with the band for over 30 minutes. In June 2006, King was present at a memorialization of his first radio broadcast at the Three Deuces Building in Greenwood, Mississippi, where an official marker of the Mississippi Blues Trail was erected.Blues Artist, Blues Musician, Blues Music. *******www***reybarksdale****/
13 Apr 2010
1575
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5:35
Written by John King, recorded by John King. Additional lead guitar by a brilliant young guitarist & friend of mine, Tom Watson. The history of early deaths in Rock, pop, blues music told thru music.
11 Mar 2009
376
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2:58
Written by John King, recorded by John King. Dedicated to all the beautiful smiles we lost on Black Saturday, 7th of Feb, 2009.
11 Mar 2009
393
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5:03
*******www.billytaylorjazz**** presents the Billy Taylor Trio performing Billy's composition "His Name Was Martin" dedicated to Dr. Martin Luther King, recorded on "It's A Matter of Pride." Billy Taylor - Piano Chip Jackson - Bass Steve Johns - Drums
30 Jun 2009
147
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3:42
BIg Jus, A Dozen Roses , 3 Kings Records , Dir:N.Perez , Drive.Thru.Filmz , For Promo Use Only
25 Apr 2012
193
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2:49
This amazing concert brings together some of the true pioneers of rock 'n' roll music including Bo Diddley, Jerry Lee Lewis, Little Richard, James Brown, Fats Domino and B.B.King. Recorded in Italy in 1989 it features these legendary artists in performance of their best loved tracks such as Papa's Got A Brand New Bag, Bo Diddley, Great Balls Of Fire, Whole Lotta Shakin' Goin' On and Blueberry Hill. At the end of the concert all the performers come together for all-star jam that leaves the audience hollering for more. It's a rare event indeed that brings so many great live performers together on one bill and this DVD captures the real excitement of the evening. To order this DVD from Amazon if you are in the UK, please click here: *******www.amazon******/dp/B000SFYZRG/?tag=wwweaglerockc-21 To order this DVD from amazon if you are in the US, please click here: *******www.amazon****/dp/B0002P191W/?tag=eaglrockente-20
6 Sep 2009
2165
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3:12
This amazing concert brings together some of the true pioneers of rock 'n' roll music including Bo Diddley, Jerry Lee Lewis, Little Richard, James Brown, Fats Domino and B.B.King. Recorded in Italy in 1989 it features these legendary artists in performance of their best loved tracks such as Papa's Got A Brand New Bag, Bo Diddley, Great Balls Of Fire, Whole Lotta Shakin' Goin' On and Blueberry Hill. At the end of the concert all the performers come together for all-star jam that leaves the audience hollering for more. It's a rare event indeed that brings so many great live performers together on one bill and this DVD captures the real excitement of the evening. To order this DVD from Amazon if you are in the UK, please click here: *******www.amazon******/dp/B000SFYZRG/?tag=wwweaglerockc-21 To order this DVD from amazon if you are in the US, please click here: *******www.amazon****/dp/B0002P191W/?tag=eaglrockente-20
26 Oct 2009
6193
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3:28
Boring by The Pierces (c) 2007 Lizard King Records
3 Dec 2009
437
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5:33
This amazing concert brings together some of the true pioneers of rock 'n' roll music including Bo Diddley, Jerry Lee Lewis, Little Richard, James Brown, Fats Domino and B.B.King. Recorded in Italy in 1989 it features these legendary artists in performance of their best loved tracks such as Papa's Got A Brand New Bag, Bo Diddley, Great Balls Of Fire, Whole Lotta Shakin' Goin' On and Blueberry Hill. At the end of the concert all the performers come together for all-star jam that leaves the audience hollering for more. It's a rare event indeed that brings so many great live performers together on one bill and this DVD captures the real excitement of the evening. To order this DVD from Amazon if you are in the UK, please click here: *******www.amazon******/dp/B000SFYZRG/?tag=wwweaglerockc-21 To order this DVD from amazon if you are in the US, please click here: *******www.amazon****/dp/B0002P191W/?tag=eaglrockente-20
3 Jan 2010
4764
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5:46
Disclaimer: I do not own the the GazettE nor do I own their music videos.. All rights go to PS Company, King Records, CLJ Records.. NO COPYRIGHT INTENDED!! {{Enjoy!!}}
29 Jan 2010
96
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1:33
PLEASE NOTE: I divided my uploads between multiple channels, Bookmark this link in your browser for instant access to an index with links to all of John1948's oldies classics. LINK: *******tinyurl****/Channel-Index (born May 3, 1933, Barnwell, S.C., U.S.—died Dec. 25, 2006, Atlanta, Ga.) American singer, songwriter, arranger, and dancer, who was one of the most important and influential entertainers in 20th-century popular music and whose remarkable achievements earned him the sobriquet "the Hardest-Working Man in Show Business." Brown was raised mainly in Augusta, Ga., by his great-aunt, who took him in at about the age of five when his parents divorced. Growing up in the segregated South during the Great Depression of the 1930s, Brown was so impoverished that he was sent home from grade school for "insufficient clothes," an experience that he never forgot and that perhaps explains his penchant as an adult for wearing ermine coats, velour jumpsuits, elaborate capes, and conspicuous gold jewelry. Neighbours taught him how to play drums, piano, and guitar, and he learned about gospel music in churches and at tent revivals, where preachers would scream, yell, stomp their feet, and fall to their knees during sermons to provoke responses from the congregation. Brown sang for his classmates and competed in local talent shows but initially thought more about a career in baseball or boxing than in music. At age 15 Brown and some companions were arrested while breaking into cars. He was sentenced to 8 to 16 years of incarceration but was released after 3 years for good behaviour. While at the Alto Reform School, he formed a gospel group. Subsequently secularized and renamed the Flames (later the Famous Flames), it soon attracted the attention of rhythm-and-blues and rock-and-roll shouter Little Richard, whose manager helped promote the group. Intrigued by their demo record, Ralph Bass, the artists-and-repertoire man for the King label, brought the group to Cincinnati, Ohio, to record for King Records's subsidiary Federal. The label's owner, Syd Nathan, hated Brown's first recording, "Please, Please, Please" (1956), but the record eventually sold three million copies and launched Brown's extraordinary career. Along with placing nearly 100 singles and almost 50 albums on the best-seller charts, Brown broke new ground with two of the first successful "live and in concert" albums—his landmark Live at the Apollo (1963), which stayed on the charts for 66 weeks, and his 1964 follow-up, Pure Dynamite! Live at the Royal, which charted for 22 weeks. During the 1960s Brown was known as "Soul Brother Number One." His hit recordings of that decade have often been associated with the emergence of the black aesthetic and black nationalist movements, especially the songs "Say It Loud—I'm Black and I'm Proud" (1968), "Don't Be a Drop-Out" (1966), and "I Don't Want Nobody to Give Me Nothin' (Open Up the Door, I'll Get It Myself)" (1969). Politicians recruited him to help calm cities struck by civil insurrection and avidly courted his endorsement. In the 1970s Brown became "the Godfather of Soul," and his hit songs stimulated several dance crazes and were featured on the sound tracks of a number of "blaxploitation" films (sensational, low-budget, action-oriented motion pictures with African American protagonists). When hip-hop emerged as a viable commercial music in the 1980s, Brown's songs again assumed centre stage as hip-hop disc jockeys frequently incorporated samples (audio snippets) from his records. He also appeared in several motion pictures, including The Blues Brothers (1980) and Rocky IV (1985), and attained global status as a celebrity, especially in Africa, where his tours attracted enormous crowds and generated a broad range of new musical fusions. Yet Brown's life continued to be marked by difficulties, including the tragic death of his third wife, charges of drug use, and a period of imprisonment for a 1988 high-speed highway chase in which he tried to escape pursuing police officers. *******www.biography****/articles/James-Brown-9228350
3 Jul 2010
186
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2:56
PLEASE NOTE: I divided my uploads between multiple channels, Bookmark this link in your browser for instant access to an index with links to all of John1948's oldies classics. LINK: *******tinyurl****/Channel-Index Benjamin Earl King (born September 28, 1938), better known as Ben E. King, is an American soul singer. He is perhaps best known as the singer and co-composer of "Stand by Me," a U.S. top 10 hit in both 1961 and 1987 and a #1 hit in the UK in 1987, and as one of the principal lead singers of the R&B vocal group The Drifters. King was born Benjamin Earl Nelson in Henderson, North Carolina and moved to Harlem, New York City, New York, at the age of nine. In 1958, he joined a doo wop group called The Five Crowns. Later that year, The Drifters' manager fired the members of the group and replaced them with The Five Crowns, who had performed several engagements with the Drifters. Nelson co-wrote the first hit by the new version of the Drifters, "There Goes My Baby" (1959). He also sang lead, using his birth name, on "Save the Last Dance for Me", a song written by Doc Pomus and Mort Shuman, "Dance With Me", "This Magic Moment", "I Count the Tears" and "Lonely Winds". King only recorded ten songs with The Drifters, including a non-single called "Temptation" which was later redone by Johnny Moore. Ben E. King career was so brief with The Drifters, The Drifters manager George Treadwell never gave Ben E. King a chance to perform with The Drifters on tour or in television. On television , A fellow Drifters member Charlie Thomas usually lip sung the songs that Ben E. King recorded with the Drifters. In 1960, he left the Drifters after failing to gain a salary increase and what he felt to be a fairer share of the group's royalties. At this point he assumed the more memorable stage name Ben E. King in preparation for a successful solo career. Remaining on Atlantic Records on its Atco imprint, King scored his first solo hit with the ballad "Spanish Harlem" (1961). "Stand by Me" was his next recording. Written by King along with Jerry Leiber and Mike Stoller, "Stand by Me" was voted as one of the Songs of the Century by the Recording Industry Association of America. "Stand by Me", "There Goes My Baby" and "Spanish Harlem" were named as three of The Rock and Roll Hall of Fame's 500 Songs that Shaped Rock and Roll and were all given a Grammy Hall of Fame Award, as well as "Save The Last Dance For Me". His other well known songs were "Don't Play That Song (You Lied)" (which was covered by Aretha Franklin in the 1970s), "Amor", "Seven Letters", "How Can I Forget", "On the Horizon", "Young Boy Blues", "I (Who Have Nothing)", "First Taste of Love", "Here Comes the Night", "Ecstasy", That's When It Hurts , Down Home , River of Tears , Do It in the Name of Love , and It's All Over . In the summer of 1963, King had a top 30 national hit with "I (Who Have Nothing)", a song that reached the Top 10 on New York's radio station, WMCA. The song has been covered many times, notably by Luther Vandross & Martha Wash, John Lennon, Shirley Bassey, Tom Jones, Sylvester James, U2, Bruce Springsteen, Jedi Mind Tricks, and most recently by American Idol contestant Jordin Sparks, during the March 20, 2007 and May 15, 2007 telecasts. King's records continued to place well on the Billboard Hot 100 chart until 1965. British pop bands began to dominate the pop music scene, but King still continued to make R&B hits and minor Pop hits. King's other hits were "What is Soul?" (1967), "Supernatural Thing, Part 1" (1975), and the re-issue in 1986 of "Stand by Me", following the song's use as the theme song to the movie Stand By Me, and though the song is used numerous times throughout the film, the film itself has nothing to do with Ben E. King or the song. Throughout his career he has achieved five number one hits, which were "There Goes My Baby", "Save The Last Dance For Me", "Stand By Me", "Supernatural Thing", and the 1986 re-issue of "Stand By Me". He also earned twelve Top 10 hits and Twenty four Top 40 hits, from 1959 to 1986. He has also been inducted to the Rock And Roll Hall Of Fame as a Drifters member and nominated for his career as a solo artist but not yet accepted. Currently, King is active in his charitable foundation, the Stand By Me Foundation. He has been a resident of Teaneck, New Jersey since the late 1960s. More recently, King performed "Stand By Me" during a televised tribute to late comedian George Carlin, as he was one of Carlin's favorite artists. SOURCE: Wikipedia
21 Oct 2010
1530
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2:48
Now, it's time for something completely different! The Spanish guitarrist, Narciso Yepes (1927.11.14 - 1997.5.3) plays Main Theme music - Romance - of the 1952 French film masterpiece, Rene Clement's Jeux Interdits (Forbidden Games). This record is a King Record pressing. I don't know much about this company except they are from Japan. I bought this record in an antique shop in Seoul flea market - it was on the turntable of an Indian Crap-o-phone. Of course, there are lots of recordings of this piece done by Narciso Yepes (and other hundreds of guitarrist) with Hi-fi recording technology. But anyway, this 78rpm recording is somewhat more nostalgic than the modern recordings. Played on my Numark Turntable.
5 Nov 2010
472
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4:41
*This is the version without video. seemed that King Record had blocked the previous one which contain original animation.* *これは動画なしバージョンです。キングレコードが制限してたので、もう一回。* Opening of Yosuga no Sora. Sorry for the late in uploading new work. I'm busy playing Monster Hunter Portable 3rd recently. ^^. well then, enjoy~ as usual harmonica used: Sirius 14 hole. ヨスガノソラのOPです。最近更新が遅くてすみません。モンハン3rdやりすぎて。w ってことで、聞いてください~ いつもと同じく、使ったハーモニカは:シリウスの14穴 Download Score(handwrite):*******kesenaitsumi89.wordpress****/2010/12/20/harmonica-video-19hiyoku-no-hanefrom-yosuga-no-sora/ 楽譜(手書き):*******kesenaitsumi89.wordpress****/2010/12/20/harmonica-video-19hiyoku-no-hanefrom-yosuga-no-sora/ P.S. Seemed that due to copyright issues, This video cannot be viewed in some country. If you cannot view this video please let me know by commenting. thanks~
21 Dec 2010
105
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2:25
PLEASE NOTE: I divided my uploads between multiple channels, Bookmark this link in your browser for instant access to an index with links to all of John1948's oldies classics. LINK: *******tinyurl****/Channel-Index To some listeners, the name Guy Mitchell evokes contempt -- as the singer whose pop-styled covers of "Singin' the Blues" and "Knee Deep in the Blues" cut the legs out from under Marty Robbins' country-styled original renditions. To others, Mitchell evokes the last period of America's innocence, the mid-'50s, when he periodically ascended the pop charts in the company of singers like Frankie Laine. Mitchell was all of those things and more, in some ways a trail-blazer -- he was the first major recording artist whose career was crafted in the studio, by a record company, and sold to the public by way of records and the radio, not concerts. He was the precursor to the late-'50s teen idols crafted by the industry as an alternative to the burgeoning success of rock & roll. In contrast to some of the younger male singing idols of that era, however, Mitchell had a genuinely good voice as his starting point in music. He was born Al Cernick in Detroit in 1927, into a Yugoslavian immigrant family whose members sang as often as possible, for their own pleasure. He made his first appearance as a singer at age three, at a wedding reception. The Cernick family moved across the country in search of a place they liked, before reaching Los Angeles in 1938. He was spotted by a talent scout and signed up as a child performer at Warner Bros. Studios that same year, and managed to broadcast over a studio-controlled radio station. The family's move to San Francisco in 1940 ended the boy's relationship with Warner Bros., but he kept taking voice lessons. A summer job on a ranch in the San Joachin Valley taught him the basics of a cowboy's skills, and by the time he was 17 he was working as an apprentice saddle-maker. He kept on singing in his spare time, and this led to the offer of a spot on a local radio show. He joined the navy for a two-year hitch in 1944, resuming his radio singing career afterward. In 1947, he joined the Carmen Cavallaro orchestra, still billed as Al Cernick, as the featured vocalist, but a bout of food-poisoning caused him to drop out. In 1948, he cut some sides for King Records as Al Grant, and won first prize on Arthur Godfrey's Talents Scouts radio program. This led to his being hired as a demo singer by various music publishers (one of the songs he demoed was "Rudolph the Red Nosed Reindeer"). The singer was signed up by impresario Eddie Joy, who intensified his training and finally introduced him to Mitch Miller, the head of Artists and Repertory for Columbia Records. It was Miller who transformed Al Cernick into Guy Mitchell, using his own first same for the surname. Mitchell's first five singles at Columbia failed, and his career was only rescued when Frank Sinatra, still with Columbia Records, declined to cut a pair of songs for which Miller had already set recording sessions and engaged musicians. Mitchell was brought into the studio, and the resulting recordings of "My Heart Cries for You" and "The Roving Kind" rode the charts for 21 weeks in 1951, selling nearly two million copies. Mitchell's cover of "Singin' the Blues" was a huge hit spending nine weeks at number one and selling well over a million copies. Mitchell had a follow-up hit with his cover of "Knee Deep in the Blues" and then milked the rock & roll bandwagon one last time with "Rock-a-billy." He never connected with audiences or the charts quite so strongly again. Late in 1959, Mitchell scored one last number one hit with "Heartaches by the Number." ~ Bruce Eder, All Music Guide
19 Feb 2011
529
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