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3:44
Go to MYRIDE.COM for more car videos. Toyota's Landspeed Prius gas-electric hybrid vehicle debuted in Bonneville, Utah as the first production hybrid to race across the Bonneville Salt Flats. The advanced technology of the popular hybrid mid-size sedan was taken to another level as Car and Driver editor Aaron Robinson drove the modified Prius on the three-mile short course, and set a hybrid record speed of 130.794 miles per hour. Other Landspeed Prius drivers included Prius executive chief engineer Shigeyuki Hori, and Fumiaki Kobayashi, group vice president technical and regulatory affairs, Toyota Motor North America, Inc. The Landspeed Prius' historical run also paved the way for a hybrid class to run at Bonneville.
15 Jul 2008
1077
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0:57
About Nebi vural sensei : "Nebi Vural Sensei was born on 29 September 1951 in Kars (a city eastern Turkey) and, since his father was an officer in the army, has lived in many different cities. He started studying karate in Ankara when he was 15 years old. He later joined self defense, judo and ju-jitsu classes in the army academy. After receiving a scholarship in 1972, he went to France to continue his education where he came into contact with aikido which he has been studying for the last 30 years. Nebi Vural Sesei is a student and close follower of renowned Japanese master Nobuyoshi Tamura Shihan (8th dan). He has had the opportunity of studying with many other aikido masters such as Kishomaru Ueshiba, M. Ueshiba (Doshu), K. Osawa, S. Arikawa, R. Shirata, M. Saito, K. Iwata, M. Nakazano, N. Ichihashi, M. Kobayashi, K. Chiba, Y. Yamada, M. Ikeda, T. Ichimura, M. Kanai, M. Sasaki, S. Sugano. "Nebi Vural Sensei gives classes in his own dojo in France during the week and on the weekends he regularly gives seminars in France and in other countries such as Cuba, Turkmenistan, Azerbaijan, Israel, Turkey, Poland and Slovakia. He is the technical consultant for the French Aikido Federation and holds a French government diploma for Aikido. He also serves as technical consultant to a number of other aikido federations. He has the highest ranking of a Turkish aikido instructor and is known around the world for practicing precise, realistic, traditional Aikido.He has 2 children and lives in Blois, France where he holds a full time position with an American company as a high level manager."
23 Nov 2009
3196
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6:57
This week on Hawaiian Grown Kitchen, Executive Chef Grant Kawasaki invites The Alley Restaurant at Aiea Bowl with Executive Chef/Owner Glenn Uyeda and Chef Dean Heartwell to share the secrets that make this location a strike! Three recipes later and we have a sample of there famous Oxtail Soup, Tasty Chicken, and Furikake Crusted Ahi. To top it all off, a three layer lemon cake! Standing out front of Aiea Bowl at 9:30 on a Friday morning, it’s hard to see why chef Glenn Uyeda would have chosen this as the place to put his Cordon Bleu training on display. The exterior of the old bowling alley is plain and drab and a little desolate. In fact, it barely looks like it’s still in business. The parking lot, though, is full. And when you step inside, the cacophony of the bowling alley—the roistering of the crowd, the crashing of the pins, the balls rumbling down the maple lanes — it all starts to make Uyeda’s decision seem pretty sly. Because, when Glenn Uyeda and his brother, Gregg, bought the place three years ago, they envisioned a different kind of bowling alley — one that blended the retro charms of bowling with quality food and a nightclub atmosphere. As chef Uyeda puts it, “Our goal in this place wasn’t just bowling and wasn’t just food; our goal was to create entertainment.” The first thing that strikes you, of course, is the bowling. Even at this hour of the morning, all 24 lanes at Aiea Bowl are full. Senior leagues commandeer the facility every day from 9 to 11 a.m, and today the place is packed with hundreds of blue-shirted members of the Aikane Bowling Club. In the afternoons and evenings, the lanes are given over to youth leagues and open bowling. In fact, the bowling side of the business is booming. Glenn attributes that success largely to Mako Kobayashi, the former owner, who has managed the place since 1970. The Uyeda brothers put him on the payroll when they bought the alley. Bowling has increased and Mako still runs three leagues and the tournaments. He also has years of knowledge. Glenn says, “I can ask, ‘Hey, Mako, can we do this or that?’ and he can tell me.” Yet, for all its popularity, bowling doesn’t pay the bills at Aiea Bowl. “A bowling alley can’t support any business in Hawaii,” Glenn says. “Even right now, without the restaurant, this bowling alley would close. Guaranteed. Even if we still had Mako’s set-in-stone lease from 25 years ago, you would still have to charge around $9.50 a game to break even.” So, although the center of attention at Aiea Bowl is definitely the lanes, the restaurant is its bread and butter. “We probably make twice as much money on the restaurant side,” Glenn says. That, and the growing reliance on income from special events are probably the biggest changes since Glenn and his brother bought the place. Those changes came at a cost, of course. “We bought this place about three years ago,” he says. “It took about 18 months to remodel.” He gestures toward the front of the building. “We tore all this out completely,” Glenn says. “This was all just a cement floor.” That space now houses the kitchen, restaurant and lounge on one side, and the pro shop, locker area and a small game arcade on the other. The build-out was expensive, but the Uyedas knew a new restaurant and bar lay at the heart of their business model. That’s what would allow them to do events and sustain the nightclub atmosphere that keeps the joint hopping in the evenings. “And then we remodeled the lanes,” he says. “We upgraded the machines. We updated the scoring system. In all, we spent about $1.5 million.” When he came back to Hawaii, Glenn knew he wanted to build a restaurant, but he didn’t like the odds at the high-end, gourmet side of the spectrum. “I decided I was going to go maybe try this middle route,” he says. And, in keeping with its bowling alley location, his ...
24 Mar 2009
234
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8:02
This week on Hawaiian Grown Kitchen, Executive Chef Grant Kawasaki invites The Alley Restaurant at Aiea Bowl with Executive Chef/Owner Glenn Uyeda and Chef Dean Heartwell to share the secrets that make this location a strike! Three recipes later and we have a sample of there famous Oxtail Soup, Tasty Chicken, and Furikake Crusted Ahi. To top it all off, a three layer lemon cake! Standing out front of Aiea Bowl at 9:30 on a Friday morning, it’s hard to see why chef Glenn Uyeda would have chosen this as the place to put his Cordon Bleu training on display. The exterior of the old bowling alley is plain and drab and a little desolate. In fact, it barely looks like it’s still in business. The parking lot, though, is full. And when you step inside, the cacophony of the bowling alley—the roistering of the crowd, the crashing of the pins, the balls rumbling down the maple lanes — it all starts to make Uyeda’s decision seem pretty sly. Because, when Glenn Uyeda and his brother, Gregg, bought the place three years ago, they envisioned a different kind of bowling alley — one that blended the retro charms of bowling with quality food and a nightclub atmosphere. As chef Uyeda puts it, “Our goal in this place wasn’t just bowling and wasn’t just food; our goal was to create entertainment.” The first thing that strikes you, of course, is the bowling. Even at this hour of the morning, all 24 lanes at Aiea Bowl are full. Senior leagues commandeer the facility every day from 9 to 11 a.m, and today the place is packed with hundreds of blue-shirted members of the Aikane Bowling Club. In the afternoons and evenings, the lanes are given over to youth leagues and open bowling. In fact, the bowling side of the business is booming. Glenn attributes that success largely to Mako Kobayashi, the former owner, who has managed the place since 1970. The Uyeda brothers put him on the payroll when they bought the alley. Bowling has increased and Mako still runs three leagues and the tournaments. He also has years of knowledge. Glenn says, “I can ask, ‘Hey, Mako, can we do this or that?’ and he can tell me.” Yet, for all its popularity, bowling doesn’t pay the bills at Aiea Bowl. “A bowling alley can’t support any business in Hawaii,” Glenn says. “Even right now, without the restaurant, this bowling alley would close. Guaranteed. Even if we still had Mako’s set-in-stone lease from 25 years ago, you would still have to charge around $9.50 a game to break even.” So, although the center of attention at Aiea Bowl is definitely the lanes, the restaurant is its bread and butter. “We probably make twice as much money on the restaurant side,” Glenn says. That, and the growing reliance on income from special events are probably the biggest changes since Glenn and his brother bought the place. Those changes came at a cost, of course. “We bought this place about three years ago,” he says. “It took about 18 months to remodel.” He gestures toward the front of the building. “We tore all this out completely,” Glenn says. “This was all just a cement floor.” That space now houses the kitchen, restaurant and lounge on one side, and the pro shop, locker area and a small game arcade on the other. The build-out was expensive, but the Uyedas knew a new restaurant and bar lay at the heart of their business model. That’s what would allow them to do events and sustain the nightclub atmosphere that keeps the joint hopping in the evenings. “And then we remodeled the lanes,” he says. “We upgraded the machines. We updated the scoring system. In all, we spent about $1.5 million.” When he came back to Hawaii, Glenn knew he wanted to build a restaurant, but he didn’t like the odds at the high-end, gourmet side of the spectrum. “I decided I was going to go maybe try this middle route,” he says. And, in keeping with its bowling alley location, his ...
24 Mar 2009
387
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3:45
This week on Hawaiian Grown Kitchen, Executive Chef Grant Kawasaki invites The Alley Restaurant at Aiea Bowl with Executive Chef/Owner Glenn Uyeda and Chef Dean Heartwell to share the secrets that make this location a strike! Three recipes later and we have a sample of there famous Oxtail Soup, Tasty Chicken, and Furikake Crusted Ahi. To top it all off, a three layer lemon cake! Standing out front of Aiea Bowl at 9:30 on a Friday morning, it’s hard to see why chef Glenn Uyeda would have chosen this as the place to put his Cordon Bleu training on display. The exterior of the old bowling alley is plain and drab and a little desolate. In fact, it barely looks like it’s still in business. The parking lot, though, is full. And when you step inside, the cacophony of the bowling alley—the roistering of the crowd, the crashing of the pins, the balls rumbling down the maple lanes — it all starts to make Uyeda’s decision seem pretty sly. Because, when Glenn Uyeda and his brother, Gregg, bought the place three years ago, they envisioned a different kind of bowling alley — one that blended the retro charms of bowling with quality food and a nightclub atmosphere. As chef Uyeda puts it, “Our goal in this place wasn’t just bowling and wasn’t just food; our goal was to create entertainment.” The first thing that strikes you, of course, is the bowling. Even at this hour of the morning, all 24 lanes at Aiea Bowl are full. Senior leagues commandeer the facility every day from 9 to 11 a.m, and today the place is packed with hundreds of blue-shirted members of the Aikane Bowling Club. In the afternoons and evenings, the lanes are given over to youth leagues and open bowling. In fact, the bowling side of the business is booming. Glenn attributes that success largely to Mako Kobayashi, the former owner, who has managed the place since 1970. The Uyeda brothers put him on the payroll when they bought the alley. Bowling has increased and Mako still runs three leagues and the tournaments. He also has years of knowledge. Glenn says, “I can ask, ‘Hey, Mako, can we do this or that?’ and he can tell me.” Yet, for all its popularity, bowling doesn’t pay the bills at Aiea Bowl. “A bowling alley can’t support any business in Hawaii,” Glenn says. “Even right now, without the restaurant, this bowling alley would close. Guaranteed. Even if we still had Mako’s set-in-stone lease from 25 years ago, you would still have to charge around $9.50 a game to break even.” So, although the center of attention at Aiea Bowl is definitely the lanes, the restaurant is its bread and butter. “We probably make twice as much money on the restaurant side,” Glenn says. That, and the growing reliance on income from special events are probably the biggest changes since Glenn and his brother bought the place. Those changes came at a cost, of course. “We bought this place about three years ago,” he says. “It took about 18 months to remodel.” He gestures toward the front of the building. “We tore all this out completely,” Glenn says. “This was all just a cement floor.” That space now houses the kitchen, restaurant and lounge on one side, and the pro shop, locker area and a small game arcade on the other. The build-out was expensive, but the Uyedas knew a new restaurant and bar lay at the heart of their business model. That’s what would allow them to do events and sustain the nightclub atmosphere that keeps the joint hopping in the evenings. “And then we remodeled the lanes,” he says. “We upgraded the machines. We updated the scoring system. In all, we spent about $1.5 million.” When he came back to Hawaii, Glenn knew he wanted to build a restaurant, but he didn’t like the odds at the high-end, gourmet side of the spectrum. “I decided I was going to go maybe try this middle route,” he says. And, in keeping with its bowling alley location, his ...
24 Mar 2009
249
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1:51
Daigo Kobayashi is a devoted cellist in an orchestra that has just been dissolved and now finds himself without a job. Daigo decides to move back to his old hometown with his wife to look for work and start over. He answers a classified ad entitled "Departures" thinking it is an advertisement for a travel agency only to discover that the job is actually for a "Nokanshi" or "encoffineer," a funeral professional who prepares deceased bodies for burial and entry into the next life.
25 May 2009
218
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1:21
A rerun of 2007's epic championship. Could anyone stop the six-time champion Kobayashi?
2 Jul 2009
844
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1:58
Op een mooie lentedag arriveert Taeko (Satomi Kobayashi), een gestresste professor uit Tokyo, op een eiland in het zuiden van Japan voor een vakantie, een enorme koffer achter zich aan slepend. Het is een bijzonder eiland, waar iedereen een bril draagt (het Japanse woord voor bril is ‘megane’). Met behulp van een handgetekende kaart komt Taeko bij het logement van de ontspannen Yuji (Ken Mitsuishi), die met opzet een klein naambord heeft opgehangen om de plaats geheim te houden. Taeko verwacht met rust gelaten te worden en is dan ook niet blij wanneer de onbezorgde Sakura (Masako Motai) de vrijheid neemt haar kamer binnen te komen om haar te wekken. Ze is er ook niet gecharmeerd van om elke maaltijd aan tafel te schuiven bij Yuji, Sakura en Haruna (Mikako Ichikawa), een biologielerares aan de lokale school. En wanneer Taeko navraag doet naar het bekijken van de omgeving, wordt ze aangekeken alsof ze van een andere planeet komt. De eilandbewoners suggereren dat ze zou moeten ‘twilighten’, zonder uit te leggen wat ‘twilighten’ is. Taeko besluit naar een ander hotel op het eiland te gaan, maar ontdekt tot haar grote schrik dat de gasten daar overdag in het veld moeten werken en ’s avonds lessen volgen. Hierop keert ze met hangende pootjes terug naar de herberg en past ze zich geleidelijk aan aan het leven op het eiland.
14 Jul 2009
204
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5:10
Round sixteen of the FIA Formula 1 World Championship, the Brazilian Grand Prix, is held in Sao Paulo on Sunday 18th October 2009. Panasonic Toyota Racing has a new race driver, Kamui Kobayashi, who will be making his Grand Prix debut in place of the injured Timo Glock.
29 Oct 2009
141
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4:18
Round fifteen of the FIA Formula 1 World Championship, the Japanese Grand Prix, is held in Suzuka on Sunday 4th October 2009. Timo Glock and Kamui Kobayashi give their thoughts on Panasonic Toyota Racing's home Grand Prix and respond to questions from fans directly from Suzuka.
29 Oct 2009
168
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4:38
Round twelve of the FIA Formula 1 World Championship, the Belgian Grand Prix, is held in Spa on Sunday 30th August 2009. Panasonic Toyota Racing drivers Jarno Trulli, Timo Glock and Kamui Kobayashi give us their thoughts on the Belgian Grand Prix and respond to questions from fans directly from Spa. Available material includes an edited package of Jarno Trulli and Timo Glock previewing the Belgian Grand Prix
29 Oct 2009
292
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2:14
Dopo lo scioglimento dell'orchestra in cui suonava come violoncellista a Tokyo, Daigo Kobayashi torna insieme alla moglie a Yamagata in una provincia rurale del nord del Giappone. Alla ricerca di un nuovo lavoro, Daigo risponde a un annuncio per un impiego "di aiuto alla partenza" convinto che si tratti di un'agenzia di viaggi. In realtà si accorge che ha a che fare con un'agenzia di pompe funebri. Spinto da necessità economiche Daigo accetta comunque il posto. Immerso in questo mondo a lui sconosciuto, l'ex musicista scopre tutto sui rituali funebri, continuando a nascondere alla moglie la vera natura del suo lavoro.
9 Apr 2010
457
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1:35
Love Drive sung by Akemi Kanda, Mamiko Noto, Yuu Kobayashi, Rina Satou
12 Aug 2010
2365
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7:21
*******www.bestindoortropicalhawaiianhouseplants**** History of Poinsettia Plants Euphorbia pulcherrima, the botanical name, or poinsettia as we call it, is native to Mexico and Guatemala in Central America. Poinsettias are part of the Euphorbiaceae family. Many plants in this family ooze a milky sap. The botanical name, Euphorbia pulcherrima, was given to the poinsettia by German botanist, Karl Ludwig Wilenow. The plant grew through a crack in his greenhouse. Dazzled by its color, he gave it the botanical name Euphorbia pulcherrima, meaning “very beautiful”. The Aztecs in the fourteenth through sixteenth centuries called the poinsettia plant “Cuetlaxochitl” in their native Nahuatl language. Seventeenth century Spanish botanist Don Juan Balme mentions poinsettia plants in his writings. At the same time the Spanish Franciscan Friars, who settled in the Taxco region of southern Mexico, included the timely winter grown red blooms of the plants in their Fiesta de Pesebre, the Nativity procession. The name “poinsettia” is derived from Joel Roberts Poinsett who was the first United States Minister to Mexico from 1825 to 1829. Mr. Poinsett first brought poinsettia plants to America. During the 1920s Albert Ecke and his son Paul became interested in poinsettia plants which grew wild in southern California at this time. In 1923 the family moved their business to Encinitas, about 2 hours south of the very fast developing area around Los Angeles. From 1923 to the mid-1960s they grew fields of poinsettia mother plants, and shipped them to plant nurseries around the country that purchased them for cultivation and future commercial sales. They became a part of the scenery in most every popular TV show and all the Christmas Specials during the holiday season. No holiday scene would be complete without at least one blooming poinsettia plant. Today Dr. Ruth Kobayashi continues to produce new poinsettia hybrids for the Ecke family. *******www.bestindoortropicalhawaiianhouseplants****.
9 Dec 2010
368
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3:47
First lap massive crash in Spain.Sutil heavy crash in Great Britain.Buemi&Piquet crash in Monaco.Glock heavy crash in Japan.Kubica&Vettel battle and crash in Australia.Massa heavy crash in Hungary.Grosjean&Heidfeld crash in practice session in Europe.Trulli,Sutil&Alonso crash at the start of Brazilian GP.Alguersuari heavy crash in Japan.Vettel crash in Monaco.Hamilton crash in Italy.Raikkonen on fire in Brazil.Kubica&Trulli extreme crash in China.Sutil&Heidfeld crash in Singapore.First lap crash in Australia.Nakajima&Kobayashi crash in Brazil.Kovalainen crash.....a to hell with it,video is full of all kind accidents.
7 Feb 2011
3590
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4:25
Hamilton crash in Spain(with original sound).Vettel and Webber crash in Turkey.Crash at the start of Bahrain GP.Webber crash into Hamilton in Australia.Kobayashi,Buemi and Hulkenberg crash in Australia.Webber and Kovalainen extreme crash in Europe GP.Barrichello heavy crash in Monaco.Buemi,Kobayashi and Liuzzi crash at the start of Chinese GP.Trulli and Chandhok extreme crash in Monaco.
16 Feb 2011
2491
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