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3:14
Displaced and destitute. Recent fighting in eastern Democratic Republic of Congo has left a humanitarian crisis. Thousands have been helped already – families have been registered, children vaccinated against deadly diseases and cooking utensils, food and basic shelter have been provided; latrines and clean running water have kept illness down to a minimum. But the flood of humanity fleeing conflict has meant aid agencies and government authorities are not been able to keep up. Many walked for days to get to these safe camps outside Goma, shaping bush and branches into makeshift homes. 16 year old Pascaline was heavily pregnant when she and her family were forced to flee. She went into labour on the road, found shelter from the pouring rain and gave birth to a healthy girl. Seeing the new born baby and young mother, Josephine took pity on the family and opened her home to them. 17 people live here now. Josephine Ndalemwa, Head of host family: "I saw this family and the young mother and her tiny baby were completely soaked from the rain and I felt really sorry for them and took them in." The main victims of the renewed fighting are children. This young boy was shot leaving his home. Brought here by an NGO worker, his leg was saved. The main goal of UNICEF's partner Heal Africa is to help rape survivors. A mobile clinic is loaded up with medicines and heads out to volatile areas where women are most vulnerable. Young boys are particularly at risk. Once fighting was their thing, now it's football. At this transit centre for children recruited by armed forces, they get their playfulness back, caring for rabbits and being cared for themselves. Celestin too was shot and had just been brought in MONUC, the UN forces here. "Celestin", 13-year-old: Fears of re-recruitment mean these children won't be united until peace holds. Villages have emptied out in the fighting. For now MONUC and Congolese government forces are in control of the town of Sake. But ongoing insecurity threatens children most. Colonel Chand Saroha, Commanding Officer MONUC: "Nkunda's forces, Mayi mayi and FDLR also, we have seen children in all these three groups, all these commanders, they generally try to lure children to pick up arms." For now a tenuous peace is holding but the crisis in eastern DR Congo remains on the edge.
17 Dec 2009
870
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1:25
Nick Harvey MP, the Liberal Democrats' Shadow Defence Secretary, reflects on five years' of military operations in Iraq, calls for an inquiry into the war and for Labour and the Conservatives to apologise for their role in it.
25 Mar 2008
252
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2:42
Liberal Democrat Leader Nick Clegg highlights the party's successes cutting crime and promises 10,000 more police on the street by scrapping Labour's ID card project.
9 Apr 2008
168
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1:36
The Magura cave is located in Northwestern Bulgaria, just 17 km from the town of Belogradchik. It is one of the longest caves in the country - the total length of uncovered passages is over 2500 m. It consists of one main gallery, pointing southeast-northwest and three side passageways. The cave-chambers are quite spacious. Each of them is over 200 m long, more than 50 m wide and over 20 m high. Walking through these galleries you will see a display of marvelous formations - stalactites, stalagmites, stalctones, cave pearls, cave milkway. Some of them are impressive both with their beauty and size. "The Big Stalactone" is over 20m high and has a diameter of 4m at its base. "The Fallen Pine" is the biggest stalagmite in all Bulgarian caves explored till now. It is over 11m long and has a diameter of 6m at its base. Geological analysis show that the formation of the Magura cave started 15 million years ago. In fact, in one of the halls were discovered unique pre-historical drawings carved into the stone and painted with bat guano. The painted figures represent dancing women, dancing and hunting men, disguised men, large variety of animals, the Sun, other stars, instruments of labour, plants etc. The drawing date from different epochs - The Epupaleolith, The Neolith, The Eneolith, the beginning of The Early Bronze Age. The Solar calendar from The Late Eneolith and some later additions, made during The Early Bronze age are quite accurate. Through pictures information about religous events and feasts along with their symbols and particular meanings were saved.
14 Apr 2008
1182
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5:28
*******www.globalchange**** Customer relationship management, CRM and customer loyalty. Why clients / customers hate automatic answering systems and how to create better customer relationship management systems. Telephone and utility companies. Need customer focus. Keep customer contact personal. Also make sure text large enough for older customers to read. Ageing population and failure to target older consumers. Impact of ageing on labour force, immigration and demographic challenges in UK, Germany and the rest of the EU. Caring for older customers. Blindness to customer needs. Examples of institutional blindness, and failure to understand customers needs. Product placement and product positioning / brand presence in homes. Business management video by keynote conference speaker Dr Patrick Dixon, Futurist and author of 12 books on global trends including Futurewise and Building a Better Business. Future of logistics and supply chain management. Future of national post offices and postal service monopolies. DHL, Fedex and UPS global competition for just-in-time courier services. Growth of air freight, alternative delivery services. Deregulation of delivery services. Distribution and supplies of components, raw materials and finished products. Package and parcel RFID tracking technologies and RFID controversy. Road, rail, air and shipping comparative costs. Inflation and outsourcing. Overnight delivery and same day delivery services -- growing demand. Pharmacies and garages lead way. Integration of EPOS data. Planning security of supplies and risk management. Online tracking and tracing of products. Integration into global supply chain, suppliers, manufacturers, wholesalers, warehouses, retail. How technology reduce costs in distribution. Last mile. Home delivery, office and factory delivery. Video by keynote conference speaker Dr Patrick Dixon, Futurist and author of 12 books on global trends including Futurewise and Building a Better Business. Logistics, supply chain, management, wholesale, retail, transportation, distribution, supplies, freight, courier, tracking, dhl, deutsche post, fedex, ups, manufacturing, post offices, monopoly, integration, software, data. Customer relationship management. Direct marketing, mailshots, maildrops, telemarketing, brochures, sales literature, business mail volumes, national post office,. Customer fatique with 30,000 brand names. Saturation of direct marketing. Advertising literature can make customers annoyed. New models of direct marketing. Niche marketing and targeted promotional campaigns. Click through rates, and response rates for direct mail campaigns. Use of databases and loyalty schemes, membership information and personal data to customise direct mailings. Direct marketers and future marketing trends. New marketing techniques and new technology. Digital marketing, web 2.0 and online marketing. SMS marketing and GPS mobile marketing using GPS. Falling response rates. Design and packaging of direct marketing mailshots. National mailing campaigns. National association of direct marketing and advertising agencies.
1 Apr 2010
1420
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7:38
A clip from a series I produce for Newmarket Access TV in the town of Newmarket, NH. In this clip we honor WWII Navy Veteran Rogewr L. Munroe who was unable to appear in studio. The program is taped bi-weekly in Town Council chambers and later aired 2 weeks later following post-production titles and photos. This has been a labour of love for both myself and the Newmarket Veterans Trust Committee. Please enjoy!!!
24 Apr 2008
148
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4:19
Sarabjit's family secures permission to meet him, NDA protest against price rise disrupts parliament, Naveen Patnaik tries to check atrocities against SC/ST, 'Chak De! India' gets award named after Billie Jean King, India and Malaysia sign MoU on labour, Hockey on priority for IOA. For more log on to www.headlinesindia****
25 Apr 2008
857
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5:38
"Come unto me, all ye that labour and are heavy laden, and I will give you rest. Take my yoke upon you, and learn of me; for I am meek and lowly in heart: and ye shall find rest unto your souls. For my yoke is easy, and my burden is light." Matthew 11:28-30 See more videos at www.SonofGodTV****
5 May 2008
529
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3:37
Cuba es, sin duda, una nación del tercer mundo.Pero ese pequeño Estado, muy pobre y bloqueado económicamente por USA, ha conseguido situarse en el puesto 51 en el IDH (Índice de Desarrollo Humano) entre todos los países del mundo. Cuba tiene un DESARROLLO HUMANO ALTO, según la ONU y ello a pesar de la manipulación que la CIA hace con las cifras que los yankees le entrega a ese organismo internacional y que la ONU usa para sus estadísticas (el PIB de Cuba, por ejemplo, que aparece en las estadísticas de la ONU es el que decide la CIA y así viene señalado en esas estadísticas). Cuba, un país muy pobre y castigado por el mayor bloqueo de la historia, pero tiene una mortandad infantil menor a la de Estados Unidos, una esperanza de vida mayor a la de ese imperio económico que presume de ser el ejemplo a seguir, la mayor proporción de médicos del mundo además de un buen sistema educativo gratuito y universal. Cuba ha demostrado lo evidente, si se la compara con cualquier país capitalista (y no bloqueado,por cierto) de su entorno geográfico-histórico-económico: Para la mayoría de una población, el reparto de la riqueza es mejor a su acumulación.El sistema socialista es mejor que el capitalista. El capitalismo es acumulación de riqueza y la dictadura de los derechos del capital y de los capitalistas sobre los derechos del trabajo y de los trabajadores. En el mundo el capitalismo y su modo de producción y distribución mata, sólo de hambre, cada año a más de 10.000.000 de personas en la Hambruna Permanente Capitalista (datos de la ONU de más de 25.000 muertos diarios).Si a ese fallecimiento de inocentes, sobre todo de niños y ancianos, sumamos los de las guerras capitalistas (provocadas por la injusticia social o directamente para la apropiación de materias primas) y sumamos los fallecimientos por enfermedades curables, obtenemos que el genocidio capitalista de los pobres del mundo está matando a más de 400.000.000 millones de personas cada 10 años (100.000.000 sólo de hambre según la ONU).EL CAPITALISMO ES EL RÉGIMEN MÁS ASESINO Y TERRIBLEMENTE GENOCIDA , QUE HA EXISTIDO JAMÁS EN LA HISTORIA HUMANA. ------------------------------------------- Cuba is a nation of the third world. Cuba is a small State, very poorly, but one has managed to place in the position 51 in the IDH (Index of Human Development) between all the countries of the world. The UNO says that Cuba has a HUMAN HIGH DEVELOPMENT in spite of the manipulation that the CIA does with the numbers that the government yankee delivers him the Organization of United Nations and that the UNO uses for its statistics (the GDP of Cuba is manipulated by the CIA that decides the numbers that must be in use, as indicated by the own UNO in this statistical information) Cuba, a country very poor and punished by the major economic blockade of the history, has an infantile minor mortality to that of The United States and a life expectancy bigger than that of this economic empire, the doctors' major proportion of the world and a good educational system. Cuba has demonstrated the evident thing, if she is compared with any capitalist country (in addition not blocked) of its geographical environment : For the majority of a population, the distribution of the richness is better to its accumulation. The socialist system is better than the capitalist.The socialism of the communists is more effective, more efficient and superior to the capitalism. The capitalism is accumulation of richness and dictatorship of the rights of the capital and of the capitalists on the labour laws and of the workers. The capitalism with its accumulation of richness and its way of production, bush in the world, only of hunger, every year to more than 10.000.000 of poor persons in the Permanent Capitalist Famine (information of the UNO of more than 25.000 daily dead men) .Si to this death of innocent, especially of children and elders, we add the murdered ones in the capitalist wars (provoked by the social injustice or directly for the appropriation of raw materials) and we add the deaths for curable diseases, obtain that the capitalist genocide of the poor of the world is killing more than 400.000.000 million persons every 10 years (100.000.000 only of hunger according to the UN). THE CAPITALISM IS THE MOST KILLER REGIME(DIET) THAT HAS NEVER EXISTED IN THE HUMAN HISTORY.
14 May 2008
6603
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5:33
unique in Britain, is Pluscarden Benedictine Abbey, near Elgin. It is the only medieval monastery in Britain still inhabited by monks and being used for its original purpose. Pluscarden Abbey as we know it today owes its foundation to King Alexander II of Scotland in the year 1230. At the same time grants were made to two other sister houses, The community that served these churches was one of French Valliscaulians, a little-known order that shared some of the strictness of the Carthusian discipline with the spirit of fellowship that existed among the Cistercians, and only at these three places was this order represented in Scotland or England. - Committed to no external duties, the monks of Pluscarden conceive their primary service to lie in prayer, regular observance, the common life. Pluscarden has chosen to keep Latin in the Mass and the divine office, except for readings. The whole office, the opus Dei as drawn by St. Benedict, has moreover been retained and apart from Vigils, is sung, with the community Mass as the liturgical point of focus; as well as grace in the refectory together with such devotions as are prompted by the season. When not at work in the grounds, or at the crafts which are carriedon in workshops and studios, the monks are employed either in the domestic jobs which inevitably take up the day in a monastery which does not engage paid labour or in the lectio (meditative reading and study) to which St. Benedict gives much prominence in his Rule. Thus the monks do their own laundry, mending, cooking, painting, repairing and maintenance generally.
2 Jun 2008
884
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3:16
More at Barak threatens to take Israeli Labour Party out of governing coalition unless Olmert steps aside
4 Jun 2008
162
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3:13
latest india news updates on strike in darjeeling and siliguri over demand of gorkhaland, gurjars protest in rajasthan, aarushi murder case developments, world day against child labour and india bangladesh cricket match. For more news and updates log on to www.headlinesindia****
9 Feb 2009
3033
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4:23
Visit *******www.yummydvd**** or *******stores.ebay****/Yummy-DVD-Home-Entertainment to purchase! In 1992 a new spiritual practice, called Falun Gong, began to spread throughout China and by 1999 had acquired over 70 million adherents. Fearing the popular practice, the Chinese government banned Falun Gong in 1999 and began harassing and jailing practitioners. To date, over 200,000 have been sent to Chinese jails and forced labour camps, many of them brutally tortured, and at least 2500 killed. In 2006, new reports have come from China alleging that thousands of imprisoned Falun Gong practitioners have had their corneas, kidneys and livers forcibly removed for sale by Chinese authorities. “Beyond the Red Wall” is a hard-hitting documentary special focusing on the movement and the persecution of these people by the Chinese authorities. It focuses on two Falun Gong practitioners – an internationally renowned painter, a Canadian citizen and resident of New York who was jailed and tortured for his beliefs, and a typically North American housewife who actively participates in and fights for Falun Gong. The film also includes never-seen-before torture footage, smuggled out of China.
18 Jun 2008
2345
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1:50
My second full day in London (May 11, 2008) started off with gorgeous sunshine. Andrea and I enjoyed a fabulous breakfast at the Zetter Hotel, a cool boutique type hotel in London’s Clerkenwell area. Then we decided to make our way to the Liverpool Street Station to hop onto the No. 11 bus that would take us past all sorts of important sights to the historic Victoria Railway Station – a great, inexpensive way to view some of London’s main attractions. We then walked toward Buckingham Palace and got caught in the crowds awaiting the famous Changing of the Guards Ritual. After the ceremonial parade had passed by, we strolled beside beautiful St. James’s Park to Trafalgar Square. From here we made our way past the Horse Guards and Downing Street (the British Prime Minister’s residence) to the Houses of Parliament where we arrived just minutes before Big Ben proudly rang out noon. From the bridge we had a perfect view of the the Parliament Buildings and the London Eye, London’s famous giant ferris wheel. Shortly after 1 pm we took a sightseeing boat from Westminster Pier to Greenwich, and enjoyed the guide’s humorous narration as he explained various sights along the riverbanks of the Thames, including Tower Bridge, one of London’s most recognized landmarks. Upon our arrival in Greenwich we had to race to the Docklands Railway to make our way to Whitechapel where we were going to link up with a tour called “The Unknown East End of London”. Harry Jackson, our certified Blue Badge tour guide filled us in about the colourful history of this area, traditionally home to successive waves of immigrant labourers who, among others, included French Huguenots, Ashkenazi Jews and more recently, Bengali immigrants. Jack the Ripper of course terrorized this area in the late 1800s and was included in the stories. On Brick Lane we happened across a street festival and ended our tour at Christ Church, Spitalfields. After a short walk we arrived at Liverpool Street Station and took the tube back to our hotel (the Zetter) where we got a brief private tour of some of the unique suites of this boutique hotel. In the late afternoon we relocated to a bed and breakfast in the Holland Park area and after settling in, we headed out to Snaresbrook to join Andrea’s friends for a tasty Indian takeout dinner. Another packed day in London!
11 Aug 2011
532
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1:40
My second full day in London (May 11, 2008) started off with gorgeous sunshine. Andrea and I enjoyed a fabulous breakfast at the Zetter Hotel, a cool boutique type hotel in London’s Clerkenwell area. Then we decided to make our way to the Liverpool Street Station to hop onto the No. 11 bus that would take us past all sorts of important sights to the historic Victoria Railway Station – a great, inexpensive way to view some of London’s main attractions. We then walked toward Buckingham Palace and got caught in the crowds awaiting the famous Changing of the Guards Ritual. After the ceremonial parade had passed by, we strolled beside beautiful St. James’s Park to Trafalgar Square. From here we made our way past the Horse Guards and Downing Street (the British Prime Minister’s residence) to the Houses of Parliament where we arrived just minutes before Big Ben proudly rang out noon. From the bridge we had a perfect view of the the Parliament Buildings and the London Eye, London’s famous giant ferris wheel. Shortly after 1 pm we took a sightseeing boat from Westminster Pier to Greenwich, and enjoyed the guide’s humorous narration as he explained various sights along the riverbanks of the Thames, including Tower Bridge, one of London’s most recognized landmarks. Upon our arrival in Greenwich we had to race to the Docklands Railway to make our way to Whitechapel where we were going to link up with a tour called “The Unknown East End of London”. Harry Jackson, our certified Blue Badge tour guide filled us in about the colourful history of this area, traditionally home to successive waves of immigrant labourers who, among others, included French Huguenots, Ashkenazi Jews and more recently, Bengali immigrants. Jack the Ripper of course terrorized this area in the late 1800s and was included in the stories. On Brick Lane we happened across a street festival and ended our tour at Christ Church, Spitalfields. After a short walk we arrived at Liverpool Street Station and took the tube back to our hotel.
27 Jun 2008
146
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1:51
My second full day in London (May 11, 2008) started off with gorgeous sunshine. Andrea and I enjoyed a fabulous breakfast at the Zetter Hotel, a cool boutique type hotel in London’s Clerkenwell area. Then we decided to make our way to the Liverpool Street Station to hop onto the No. 11 bus that would take us past all sorts of important sights to the historic Victoria Railway Station – a great, inexpensive way to view some of London’s main attractions. We then walked toward Buckingham Palace and got caught in the crowds awaiting the famous Changing of the Guards Ritual. After the ceremonial parade had passed by, we strolled beside beautiful St. James’s Park to Trafalgar Square. From here we made our way past the Horse Guards and Downing Street (the British Prime Minister’s residence) to the Houses of Parliament where we arrived just minutes before Big Ben proudly rang out noon. From the bridge we had a perfect view of the the Parliament Buildings and the London Eye, London’s famous giant ferris wheel. Shortly after 1 pm we took a sightseeing boat from Westminster Pier to Greenwich, and enjoyed the guide’s humorous narration as he explained various sights along the riverbanks of the Thames, including Tower Bridge, one of London’s most recognized landmarks. Upon our arrival in Greenwich we had to race to the Docklands Railway to make our way to Whitechapel where we were going to link up with a tour called “The Unknown East End of London”. Harry Jackson, our certified Blue Badge tour guide filled us in about the colourful history of this area, traditionally home to successive waves of immigrant labourers who, among others, included French Huguenots, Ashkenazi Jews and more recently, Bengali immigrants. Jack the Ripper of course terrorized this area in the late 1800s and was included in the stories. On Brick Lane we happened across a street festival and ended our tour at Christ Church, Spitalfields. After a short walk we arrived at Liverpool Street Station and took the tube back to our hotel ...
27 Jun 2008
177
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