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http://www.Hoteloogle.com Set right in the heart of London's bustling shopping and theatre district, the Courthouse Hotel Kempinski offers a luxurious haven for those wishing to enjoy the best the capital has to offer. The Courthouse Hotel's location on Great Marlborough Street positions it a stone's throw from Regent Street, Carnaby Street and Bond Street, home to some of the most fashionable shops in London. It is also perfectly placed for theatre-goers, with the London Palladium as a next door neighbour and a stroll away from Covent Garden. With 116 well-appointed rooms, ranging from the delightful penthouse suite to surprisingly spacious standard accommodation, the rooms offer everything you need to make your stay a memorable one. The onsite restaurant's cuisine ranges from traditional afternoon teas to modern French in the Carnaby Brasserie, to Italian, Middle Eastern and Asian.
27 Oct 2008
58
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7:54
Award-winning virtuoso concert pianist/master magician, Garin Bader performs piano concerts with many original illusions, martial arts, and storytelling around the world from Carnegie Hall to the London Palladium; from Hollywood Magic Castle to Las Vegas
13 Feb 2010
127
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6:10
http://www.tributebandreviews.co.uk - 80's tribute band (Electric Dreams) have supported Buck's Fizz on two national theatre tours including the opening of their 30th anniversary show at the London Palladium. Since then they've performed at venues all over the UK, at leisure resorts, hotels, night clubs, corporate functions and weddings. Electric Dreams perform a tantalizing mix of classic eighties hits.
8 Mar 2012
155
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5:44
Rufus! Rufus! Rufus! does Judy! Judy! Judy! Martha Wainwright singing "Stormy Weather". From the Live at the London Palladium DVD. Buy the DVD and support Rufus!
7 Jan 2009
722
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0:00
1. Overture: Chariots of fire, Release me 2. This is what you mean to me 3. The way it used to be 4. Still 5. A man without love 6. There goes my everything 7. Spanish eyes 8. Engelbert rap 9. Medley: Nothing a little love won't cure, Land of a thousand dancers 10. Am I that easy to forget 11. Quando quando quando 12. Love is a many splendoured thing 13. Medley: Great balls of fire, Proud Mary 14. This moment in time 15. Heaven help my heart (Louise Dorsey) 16. After the loving 17. The shadow of your smile 18. Strangers in the night 19. How to win your love 20. Nothing in this world 21. The last waltz 22. Release me 23. Dance the night away
14 Jul 2013
4210
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Morrissey - live at the London Palladium, 28 May 2006 (1/7) - Intro - Panic - First Of The Gang To Die Many thanks to the taper of the show, whoever it was
19 Jun 2008
181
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6:30
In 1976 Marvin Gayes marriage was about to collapse. He was also just about to be imprisoned because of non-paid child-support to his wife Anna. Reputedly Motown bailed Marvin out and he was suggested to leave US for a some time. Promoter Jeffrey Kruger arranged a European tour to start up in September 1976 and it also included a long waited visit to England for the first time in ten years. This concert in question was held in 10th October before sell-out audience in Edenhall concert hall Amsterdam. The track listing is pretty much identical compared to the Album "Marvin Gaye - Live At The London Palladium!" which was recorded on the same tour seven days earlier. Only songs missing are "Trouble Man" and "God is Love". All the other tracks are exactly (although in different order) the same as on this DVD, even including the content of medleys. These Medleys are actually one of the biggest problems in this concert. In a way the whole concert is one gigantic medley, while atleast what I was expecting, were the full versions of the songs. If compared to the performances in the "Live in Montreux" DVD this concert feels pretty boring. Marvin himself explained the reason for these medleys in Sharon Davis´ biography book like this; "I got a list of songs from my promoter. He told me all the tracks that were popular in England and I just put them into medley form for few minutes because I hadn´t done them in years. In fact, when I sing them in the States people go for popcorn and hot dogs. The only way you can perform an old record in the States is if you are very animated about it because American´s don´t want memories. They´re not nostalgic people. So I can´t understand why British audiences want to hear the old stuff because for me the songs are very painful, especially those with Tammi Terrell..." The show starts up with two songs from the "I Want you" album; "All The Way Round" and "Since I Had You". The effect of constant eating of junk food and irregular sleeping habits can bee seen on Marvins body as his appearance looks a bit sleepy and swollen. The song "Come Get To This" leads the concert onwards as an intro to an extended version of "Let´s Get It On" in which Marvin really "gets it on" in seducing the female viewers in the audience. After "Let´s Get It On" begins the chain of medleys which won´t end until the finale which is the "Distant Lover". First medley includes some biggest 60´s hits like "Pride and Joy", "I Heard It Through The Grapewine" ect. The second medley consisted of songs from the "What´s Going On?" album starting with "Inner City Blues" and then leading through "What´s Going On?" to "Save The Children". For the final medley of classic duet songs, Marvin was joined on stage by a lady called Florence Lyles. With Florence Marvin sings through songs like "You´re All I Need" and "Ain´t No Mountain High Enough", but unfortunately Flo´s voice sounds really flat compared to original duet partners like Tammi Terrels or Kim Westons. She really doesn´t make any justice for these songs although It´s only my own oppinion. The Finale "Distant lover" is probably the best act in this concert though I think a better performance can be heard on the "Live At The London Palladium" album.
26 Jul 2009
7982
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3:47
Live At The London Palladium
6 Sep 2009
6745
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1:53
Rufus! Rufus! Rufus! does Judy! Judy! Judy! Singing "Puttin' On The Ritz". From the Live at the London Palladium DVD. Buy the DVD and support Rufus!
7 Sep 2009
816
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8:55
Some video clips of the TV BAFTA Awards held on 20th April 2008 at the London Palladium. Loads of the stars that turned up were lovely and happy to have pictures taken with us! Love James Corden for giving me a hug! Some of the people in the video include Alan Dale, Charity Wakefield, Joanna Lumley, John Hurt, Charlie Clements, Lacey Turner, Graham Norton, James Nesbitt, Kirsty and Phil, Sanjeev Bhaskar, Nick Hoult, Mike Bailey, Larissa Wilson, Ruth Jones, James Corden, Justin Lee Collins, Michael Underwood, Angleica Bell, Stephen Merchant, Simon Pegg, Aleesha Dixon, Matthew McFadyen, Andrew Marr, Ben Miller, Patrick Duffy, Stars of Strictly Come Dancing, Joanna Page, Robert Webb, David Mitchell, Bruce Forsyth, Chris O'Dowd, Tess Daly and many more!
13 Dec 2009
309
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3:39
High Quality link is just below video... Duffy singing Rain On Your Parade at The Royal Variety Performance 2008, at the London Palladium.
4 Apr 2010
485
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5:02
Rufus! Rufus! Rufus! does Judy! Judy! Judy! Singing "Somewhere Over The Rainbow" accompanied by his mother Kate McGarrigle. From the Live at the London Palladium DVD. Buy the DVD and support Rufus!
4 Dec 2010
7699
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2:54
Al Martino (born Alfred Cini, October 7, 1927 -- October 13, 2009) was an American singer and actor. He had his greatest success as a singer between the early 1950s and mid 1970s, being described as "one of the great Italian American pop crooners", and also became well known as an actor, particularly for his role as singer Johnny Fontane in The Godfather. Alfred Cini was born in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. His parents were immigrants from Malta who ran a construction business, and while growing up he worked alongside his brothers as a bricklayer. However, he was inspired to become a singer by emulating artists such as Al Jolson and Perry Como, and by the success of a family friend, Alfredo Cocozza, who had changed his name to Mario Lanza. After serving with the United States Marines in World War II, including being a part of the Iwo Jima invasion where he was wounded, Cini began his singing career. Encouraged by Lanza, he adopted the stage name Al Martino, taken from his mother's maiden name, and began singing in local nightclubs. In 1948 he moved to New York City, and in 1952 won first place on Arthur Godfrey's Talent Scouts television program with a performance of Como's hit "If". The record's success led to a deal with Capitol Records, and he released three more singles — "Take My Heart," "Rachel," and "When You're Mine" — through 1953, all of which hit the U.S. Top 40.[1] However, his success also attracted the attention of the Mafia, which bought out Martino's management contract and ordered him to pay $75,000 as a safeguard for their investment.After making a down-payment to appease them, he moved to Britain. His popularity allowed him to continue to perform and record successfully in the UK, headlining at the London Palladium and having six further British chart hits in the period up to 1955, including "Now" and "Wanted". However, his work received no exposure back in the US In 1958, thanks to the intervention of a family friend, Martino was allowed to return to the US and resume his recording career, but he faced difficulties in re-establishing himself, especially with the arrival of rock and roll. The success of his 1962 album The Exciting Voice of Al Martino secured him a new contract with Capitol, and was followed by a mostly Italian language album, The Italian Voice of Al Martino, which featured his version of the then internationally popular song, "Al Di Là." He also made several high-profile television appearances, helping to re-establish his visibility. In 1963, he had his biggest US chart success with "I Love You Because", a cover of Leon Payne's 1950 country music hit. Arranged by Belford Hendricks, Martino's version went to #3 on the US Billboard Hot 100 chart, and #1 on the Easy Listening chart. The album of the same name went Top 10 in the Billboard 200. Martino had four other US top 10 hits in 1963 and 1964 - "Painted, Tainted Rose" (1963), "I Love You More and More Every Day", "Tears and Roses" and "Silver Bells" (all 1964). He also sang the title song for the 1964 film, Hush, Hush, Sweet Charlotte. One of his biggest hits was "Spanish Eyes", achieving several gold and platinum discs for sales issued in 1973.The song, with a tune by Bert Kaempfert originally titled "Moon Over Naples", is among the 50 most played songs worldwide. Martino's run of chart success faded after the mid-1960s, although many of his records continued to reach the US Hot 100. Another later hit was a disco version of "Volare", (also known as "Nel blu, Dipinto di Blu"). In 1976, it reached number one on the Italian and Flemish charts, and was in the Top Ten in Spain. Apart from singing, Martino played the role of Johnny Fontane in the 1972 film The Godfather, as well as singing the film's theme, "Speak Softly Love". He played the same role in The Godfather Part III and The Godfather Trilogy: 1901--1980. He later returned to acting, playing aging crooner Sal Stevens in the short film Cutout, appearing in film festivals around the world in 2006. Martino died on October 13, 2009 at his childhood home in Springfield, Pennsylvania, 6 days after his 82nd birthday. Martino was survived by his wife Judi and three children. In December 2009, Al Martino was inducted into the Hit Parade Hall of Fame.
3 Feb 2011
245
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2:19
1969 http://www.amazon.com/gp/redirect.html?ie=UTF8&location=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.amazon.com%2FMary-Hopkin%2Fe%2FB000AP5T0G%3Fqid%3D1290045456%26sr%3D1-2-ent&tag=concerts0b-20&linkCode=ur2&camp=1789&creative=9325 More Mary Hopkin: http://lifeofthebeatles.blogspot.com/search/label/mary%20hopkin After marrying Visconti in 1971, Hopkin withdrew from the pop music scene to have a family. Although reportedly unhappy with show business, Hopkin did not stop recording. She travelled to Australia with Visconti in January 1972 and performed at a large outdoor rock festival in South Australia, in addition to giving concerts in several major cities. With the help of Visconti, 1972 saw the release of the Christmas song "Mary Had a Baby" / "Cherry Tree Carol" on Regal Zonophone Records, re-released in 1973. In June 1972, the single "Summertime Summertime" / "Sweet And Low" was released on Bell Records under the name of Hobby Horse. Although no other singles or albums came out in her name until 1976, she sang on numerous recordings that her husband Visconti produced, such as those featuring Tom Paxton, Ralph McTell, David Bowie (Low), Bert Jansch, The Radiators From Space, Thin Lizzy, Carmen, Sarstedt Brothers, Osibisa, Sparks, Hazel O'Connor and Elaine Paige. On all of these recordings (and also on her husband's own album Inventory) she is credited as Mary Visconti. During this time, she also appeared on various TV shows such as Cilla Black's and various radio programmes. In 1976, she returned to recording under her own name and released the single "If You Love Me (Really Love Me)" (originally recorded by Édith Piaf), which reached Number 32 in the UK chart. The B-side, "Tell Me Now," was an original composition by Hopkin. Her next single was "Wrap Me In Your Arms," with the B-side again written by Hopkin ("Just A Dreamer"). These singles came out on Visconti's Good Earth Records label. Several songs recorded for an album at the time have now been released under Hopkin's own label, Mary Hopkin Music. Two members of Steeleye Span (Bob Johnson and Pete Knight) chose Hopkin to play "Princess Lirazel" on their concept album The King of Elfland's Daughter. She also appeared at the Cambridge Folk Festival with Bert Jansch. 1976 also saw the birth of her second child. Before the 1970s ended, Decca released a compilation album of Hopkin's Cambrian recordings, The Welsh World of Mary Hopkin. Hopkin's first project in the 1980s was a well-reviewed stint playing the Virgin Mary in Rock Nativity at the Hexagon Theatre in Reading, Berkshire. After this, Mike Hurst (record producer and formerly of The Springfields) asked her to sing lead in a new group named Sundance that he had formed with Mike de Albuquerque of ELO. Their only single, "What's Love", allowed them to tour the UK with Dr. Hook but Hopkin quickly left the group, dissatisfied with the gigs. "What's Love" proved very popular in South Africa, albeit the only territory that it charted, where it peaked at no.10 in April 1982. In 2002, Hurst released recordings from this time on the Angel Air label. Hopkin and Visconti divorced in 1981. The following year she provided melismatic vocals on "Rachel's Song" for the Vangelis soundtrack of Blade Runner. Around 1984, Peter Skellern asked her to join him and Julian Lloyd Webber in a band called Oasis. Their album Oasis was released on WEA along with two singles. A tour of the UK was planned but was brought to an abrupt end because Hopkin became ill. The group disbanded shortly afterwards. During the 1980s Hopkin appeared in several charity shows, including an appearance at the London Palladium with Ralph McTell. In 1988, she took part in George Martin's production of Dylan Thomas' Under Milk Wood. She played the character Rosie Probert and notably performed a piece called "Love Duet" with Freddie Jones as Captain Cat. The making of the record was filmed and made into a special edition of The South Bank Show, where Hopkin and Jones were shown rehearsing and recording "Love Duet". In 1992, the cast reunited for a performance of the play as a tribute to Thomas in the presence of Prince Charles for The Prince's Trust. Hopkin recorded an album called Spirit in 1989. This was released on the Trax label and is a collection of light classical songs and featured the single "Ave Maria". The record was produced by Benny Gallagher of Gallagher and Lyle, who had contributed songs to her during her days at Apple Records.
23 Jul 2011
236
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2:36
The novelty of Judy Garland: Live at the London Palladium is the spectacle of the great entertainer sharing the stage with her up-and-coming daughter. In November 1964 Liza Minnelli was not yet 20 and not yet a Broadway success. She looks it: the coltish, appealingly gawky girl is still pretty raw (at one point after a costume change she yanks off her earrings just before launching into a song), and Garland seems alternately proud of and bemused by her. The video is pretty raw, too, a rough black-and-white affair that can best be described as serviceable in quality. However, fans of this brand of showbiz razzmatazz will be satisfied with the duets between the women (especially trading verses on a medley of "Happy Days Are Here Again" and "Get Happy"). Judy opens the show with the reliable chest sweller "Once in a Lifetime" (no relation to the Talking Heads tune) and delivers a tutorial in song dynamics with "The Man That Got Away." She appears rather shrunken and tired but still comes on like a trouper, fending off the audience's constant heckling for "Over the Rainbow" (as though she might forget it?) before finally handing the song back to them as a touching sing-along. This was Garland's last appearance at the Palladium. It's also a passing of the torch to Liza, who would later become the kind of polished dynamo embodied by her mother, more than capable of holding down her own one-woman shows.
4 Nov 2011
4355
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2:36
The novelty of Judy Garland: Live at the London Palladium is the spectacle of the great entertainer sharing the stage with her up-and-coming daughter. In November 1964 Liza Minnelli was not yet 20 and not yet a Broadway success. She looks it: the coltish, appealingly gawky girl is still pretty raw (at one point after a costume change she yanks off her earrings just before launching into a song), and Garland seems alternately proud of and bemused by her. The video is pretty raw, too, a rough black-and-white affair that can best be described as serviceable in quality. However, fans of this brand of showbiz razzmatazz will be satisfied with the duets between the women (especially trading verses on a medley of "Happy Days Are Here Again" and "Get Happy"). Judy opens the show with the reliable chest sweller "Once in a Lifetime" (no relation to the Talking Heads tune) and delivers a tutorial in song dynamics with "The Man That Got Away." She appears rather shrunken and tired but still comes on like a trouper, fending off the audience's constant heckling for "Over the Rainbow" (as though she might forget it?) before finally handing the song back to them as a touching sing-along. This was Garland's last appearance at the Palladium. It's also a passing of the torch to Liza, who would later become the kind of polished dynamo embodied by her mother, more than capable of holding down her own one-woman shows.
4 Nov 2011
4474
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