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Balanced Health Today Call Now 1(888)277-4980 1. Seek emergency medical attention. Call 911 and remove yourself from the area immediately. Do not wait for symptoms to develop. If you know you have been exposed to ionized radiation, seek treatment the fastest possible way. Mild to moderate forms of radiation sickness can be treated. More severe forms are usually fatal. If you think you have been exposed to a dose of radiation, remove all clothing and materials you were wearing at the time and place them in a plastic bag. Wash your body with soap and water as soon as possible. Do not scrub the skin. That may cause irritation or break the skin which can lead to systemic absorption of any remaining radiation from the surface of the skin. 2. Determine the level of exposure. Understanding the type of ionized radiation at the site where your exposure occurred and how much your body absorbed are key factors in reaching a diagnosis of the level of severity. The goals for treatment for radiation sickness include avoiding any further contamination, treat the most immediate life-threatening problems, reduce symptoms, and manage pain. Those who experience mild to moderate exposure and receive treatment often have a full recovery. For a person who survives the radiation exposure, the blood cells will begin to replenish themselves after four to five weeks. Severe and very severe exposure results in death ranging from two days to two weeks following exposure. In most cases, the cause of death from radiation sickness is due to internal bleeding and infections. 3. Receive prescription medications. Often, radiation sickness symptoms can be effectively managed in a hospital setting. The approach to treatment involves maintaining hydration, controlling the progressive development of symptoms, preventing infection, and allowing the body to recover. Antibiotics are prescribed to treat infections that more commonly occur in people with radiation sickness. Since the bone marrow is sens
23 Apr 2017
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15:44
Balanced Health Today Call Now 1(888)277-4980 Radiation sickness occurs after exposure to a large amount of ionizing radiation over a short period of time. The symptoms of radiation sickness generally present in a predictable or orderly manner, most often after a sudden and unexpected exposure to high levels of radiation. In medical terms, radiation sickness is known as acute radiation syndrome, radiation poisoning, radiation injury, or radiation toxicity. The symptoms develop rapidly and are related to the level of exposure. Exposure to enough radiation to cause sickness is rare. 1. Watch for symptom progression. Pay attention to the symptoms that develop, their severity, and their timing. It is possible for doctors to predict the level of radiation exposure from the timing and the nature of the symptoms. The severity of symptoms will vary depending on the radiation dose received, and the parts of the body that absorbed the emissions. The determining factors in the degree of radiation sickness are the type of exposure, the exposed parts of the body, the duration of exposure, the strength of the radiation, and how much your body has absorbed. The cells in your body that are most sensitive to radiation include the lining of your stomach and intestinal tract, and the cells found in your bone marrow that produce new blood cells. The degree of exposure guides the presentation of symptoms. Initial symptoms involving the gastrointestinal tract can appear within ten minutes. If the skin was directly exposed or contaminated, redness, rash, and burning can begin almost immediately. 2. Identify the symptoms. There is no way to predict the exact course of a radiation exposure event that leads to radiation sickness since there are many variables involved. The symptom presentation is, however predictable. The degree of exposure, ranging from mild to very severe, can alter the timing of symptom development. The following symptoms are consistent with radiation sickness. Naus
19 Apr 2017
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Balanced Health Today Call Now 1(888)277-4980 There is no cure for radiation sickness, but symptoms can be treated. The effects cannot be reversed, but timely treatment can help to contain the damage. Nausea, diarrhea, vomiting, and weakness can be treated with medications that target these complaints. Blood transfusions may be needed to treat anemia, and antibiotics reduce the threat of infections. Patients with some cancers will need both radiotherapy and chemotherapy. Patients who have chemotherapy sometimes take the drug filgrastim to stimulate white blood cells. This may be helpful in repairing the damage to bone marrow caused by radiation. Preventing radiation sickness It is important to minimize exposure to radiation. This includes taking appropriate safety measures when working with radiation, avoiding unnecessary X-ray exposure, and being mindful of the dangers of radiation when considering treatments for cancer. During X-ray imaging tests or radiation therapy, a patient should have a protective shield over the parts of the body not being treated or studied. A female patient should inform the technician if she is, nor may be, pregnant. A patient who is undergoing radiation therapy can take potassium iodide KI orally either before or after exposure, to protect the thyroid gland from damage. For best results, it should be taken before. If exposure is limited to hands and feet, and no vital organs have been contaminated, the danger is greatly reduced, and radiation poisoning is less likely. Most countries have strict rules about the use of radioactive materials in science and industry. If there is an accidental or deliberate release of radioactive material, strategies are in place to evacuate people or to shelter them in appropriate places. If a major emergency occurred, for example, a radioactive accident or attack, emergency teams would need to identify what type of radiation people had been exposed to, in order to decide how to treat them.
17 Apr 2017
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Balanced Health Today Call Now 1(888)277-4980 Nausea is the first sign of radiation sickness after cancer treatment. Medication can help to reduce this. Nausea may cease and then return after a few days. If nausea and vomiting occur within 24 hours of treatment, the patient should contact their physician. Headaches, weakness, and fatigue often occur with mild radiation sickness, and they may continue for some time after the therapy is finished. High doses of radiation therapy for cancer can lead to high fever, hair loss, bloody stools, or diarrhea. Patients who experience these symptoms in the first few days after treatment should consult their physician to see if this is normal for the dose received. Longer term exposure to radiation, at lower doses that do not normally incur serious radiation sickness, can induce cancer, because they can cause genetic mutations. Diagnosing radiation sickness To diagnose radiation sickness, blood tests may be carried out over several days. The results can reveal if there is a reduction in white blood cells. White blood cells fight disease. Blood tests can also detect any abnormal changes in the DNA of blood cells. These factors indicate the degree of bone marrow damage. Normally, the higher the dose, the greater the effect on white blood cells and bone marrow. A device called a dosimeter can measure the absorbed dose of radiation, and a Geiger counter can determine where a person has radioactive particles in their body.
16 Apr 2017
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Balanced Health Today Call Now 1(888)277-4980 The lymphatic system is an extensive drainage network that helps keep bodily fluid levels in balance and defends the body against infections. The lymphatic system is made up of a network of lymphatic vessels. These vessels carry lymph — a clear, watery fluid containing protein molecules, salts, glucose, urea, and other substances throughout the body. The spleen is located in the upper left part of the abdomen under the ribcage. It works as part of the lymphatic system to protect the body, clearing worn-out red blood cells and other foreign bodies from the bloodstream to help fight off infection. Why They're Important One of the lymphatic system's major jobs is to collect extra lymph fluid from body tissues and return it to the blood. This process is important because water, proteins, and other substances are continuously leaking out of tiny blood capillaries into the surrounding body tissues. If the lymphatic system didn't drain the excess fluid, it would build up in the body's tissues and they would swell. The lymphatic system also helps defend the body against germs like viruses, bacteria, and fungi that can cause illnesses. Those germs are filtered out in the lymph nodes, which are small masses of tissue located along the network of lymph vessels. The nodes house lymphocytes, a type of white blood cell. Some of those lymphocytes make antibodies, special proteins that fight off germs and stop infections from spreading by trapping disease-causing germs and destroying them. The spleen also helps the body fight infection. The spleen contains lymphocytes and another kind of white blood cell called macrophages, which engulf and destroy bacteria, dead tissue, and foreign matter and remove them from the blood passing through the spleen. The lymphatic system is a network of very small tubes vessels that drain lymph fluid from all over the body. The major parts of the lymph tissue are located in the bone marrow, spleen,
16 Apr 2017
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Balanced Health Today Call Now 1(888)277-4980 Radiation: Handle with care. There are two basic types of radiation, ionizing and nonionizing. Nonionizing radiation comes in the form of light, radio waves, microwaves, and radar. This kind of radiation does not usually cause tissue damage. Ionizing radiation has immediate chemical effects on human tissue. X-rays, gamma rays, and particle bombardment through a neutron beam, electron beam, protons, mesons, and others give off ionizing radiation. This type of radiation can be used for medical testing and treatment, industrial and manufacturing purposes, weapons development, and more. A high dose of radiation can be fatal within hours or days. This could happen during total body radiation, such as in preparation for a bone marrow transplant, or it could be the result of an accident, such as a nuclear explosion. Repeated exposure to radiation can damage the cells of the body by changing the chemical composition. It can be dangerous, triggering genetic changes that can be permanent or temporary. If exposure affects the genes, or DNA, it can lead to benign or cancerous tumors and cataracts. Radiation sickness is often associated with radiotherapy, a common treatment for cancer. The aim is to kill the cancerous cells, but healthy cells can be affected too. The dose of radiation used depends on the type of radiotherapy, the way it is administered, and the type of cancer. Common effects that result from radiation therapy include hair loss, damage to the salivary glands, and nausea and vomiting. If the radiation is external, for example, when a beam is directed from outside to destroy a tumor, say, in the neck, the skin may be irritated or burned. Long-term side effects can appear years later, and they include infertility, memory loss, and occasionally, a second cancer.
13 Apr 2017
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15:28
Balanced Health Today Call Now 1(888)277-4980 To diagnose HD, your doctor will perform a physical exam and ask you about your medical history. Your doctor will also order certain tests to make a proper diagnosis. The following tests may be done: * imaging tests, such as X-rays or CT scans * lymph node biopsy, which involves removing a piece of lymph node tissue to test for the presence of abnormal cells * blood tests, such as a complete blood count CBC, to measure levels of red blood cells, white blood cells, and platelets * immunophenotyping to determine the type of lymphoma cells that are present * lung function tests to determine how well your lungs are working * an echocardiogram to determine how well your heart is working * bone marrow biopsy, which involves the removal and examination of marrow inside your bones to see if the cancer has spread Staging Once an HD diagnosis has been made, the cancer is assigned a stage. Staging describes the extent and severity of the disease. It will help your doctor determine your treatment options and outlook. There are four general stages of HD: * Stage I early stage means that cancer is found in one lymph node region. * Stage II locally advanced disease means that cancer is found in two lymph node regions on one side of the diaphragm, which is the muscle beneath your lung. It may also indicate that cancer was found in one lymph node region as well as in a nearby organ. * Stage III advanced disease means that cancer is found in lymph node regions both above and below your diaphragm. It may also indicate that cancer was found in one lymph node area and in one organ on opposite sides of your diaphragm. * Stage IV widespread disease means that cancer was found outside the lymph nodes and has spread to other parts of your body, such as your bone marrow, liver, or lung.
11 Apr 2017
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Balanced Health Today Call Now 1(888)277-4980 A lymph node is a small, round or bean-shaped cluster of cells covered by a capsule of connective tissue. The cells are a combination of lymphocytes which produce protein particles that capture invaders, such as viruses and macrophages, which break down the captured material. Lymphocytes and macrophages filter your lymphatic fluid as it travels through your body and protect you by destroying invaders. Lymph nodes are located in groups, and each group drains a specific area of your body. You may be more likely to notice swelling in certain areas, such as in the lymph nodes in your neck, under your chin, in your armpits and in your groin. The site of the swollen lymph nodes may help identify the underlying cause. The most common cause of swollen lymph nodes is an infection, particularly a viral infection, such as the common cold. Other possible causes of swollen lymph nodes include: Common infections * Strep throat * Measles * Ear infections * Infected (abscessed) tooth * Mononucleosis * Skin or wound infections, such as cellulitis * Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) — the virus that causes AIDS Uncommon infections * Tuberculosis * Syphilis * Toxoplasmosis — a parasitic infection resulting from contact with the feces of an infected cat or eating undercooked meat * Cat scratch fever — a bacterial infection from a cat scratch or bite Immune system disorders * Lupus — a chronic inflammatory disease that can target your joints, skin, kidneys, blood cells, heart and lungs * Rheumatoid arthritis — a chronic inflammatory disease that targets the tissue that lines your joints (synovium) Cancers * Lymphoma — cancer that originates in your lymphatic system * Leukemia — cancer of your body's blood-forming tissue, including your bone marrow and lymphatic system * Other cancers that have spread (metastasized ) to lymph nodes Other possible but rare causes include certain medications, such as the anti-seizure medication
9 Apr 2017
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This cute YouTube star named Audrey, with a rare bone marrow syndrome called Diamond Blackfan Anemia (DBA), doing lovely fashion show.
29 Mar 2017
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15:28
Balanced Health Today Call Now 1(888)277-4980 The lymphatic system is a vital part of the immune system, along with the thymus, bone marrow, spleen, tonsils, appendix, and Peyer patches in the small intestine. The lymphatic system is a network of lymph nodes connected by lymphatic vessels. This system transports lymph throughout the body. Lymph is formed from fluid that seeps through the thin walls of capillaries into the body's tissues. This fluid contains oxygen, proteins, and other nutrients that nourish the tissues. Some of this fluid reenters the capillaries and some of it enters the lymphatic vessels (becoming lymph). Small lymphatic vessels connect to larger ones and eventually form the thoracic duct. The thoracic duct is the largest lymphatic vessel. It joins with the subclavian vein and thus returns lymph to the bloodstream. Lymph also transports foreign substances (such as bacteria), cancer cells, and dead or damaged cells that may be present in tissues into the lymphatic vessels and to lymph organs for disposal. Lymph contains many white blood cells. All substances transported by the lymph pass through at least one lymph node, where foreign substances can be filtered out and destroyed before fluid is returned to the bloodstream. In the lymph nodes, white blood cells can collect, interact with each other and with antigens, and generate immune responses to foreign substances. Lymph nodes contain a mesh of tissue that is tightly packed with B cells, T cells, dendritic cells, and macrophages. Harmful microorganisms are filtered through the mesh, then identified and attacked by B cells and T cells. Lymph nodes are often clustered in areas where the lymphatic vessels branch off, such as the neck, armpits, and groin. Disorders of The Lymphatic System The lymphatic system may not carry out its function adequately due to
25 Mar 2017
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Are you in need of a bone marrow transplant in India? Transplant Counsellor India provides high quality bone marrow transplantation at best hospitals in India.
7 Mar 2017
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Greetings to all the charitable people who can’t ignore our cry for help. This is for a 15-year old girl Daryna. Just three months ago, she was a happy, active child, full of joy. Her rare and serious illness came very suddenly – Daryna began to get extremely tired of her usual physical activities and she even had a hard time walking, breathing heavily. She became very weak, showed signs of complete apathy and had frequent nose and gum bleeds. The bleeding wouldn’t stop for hours. After long and careful observations, the doctors diagnosed her with a rare disease called Severe Aplastic Anemia that can develop fast and be fatal without proper cure. Daryna’s condition is becoming worse every day. Each week, her body requires a blood transfusion because her bone marrow cannot produce the blood cells necessary for her to survive. In her severe case of Aplastic Anemia, the doctors concluded that the only cure would be the bone marrow transplant. Darina is not an American so she can’t be treated here without insurance. At this point, our only hope is to raise funds for Darina’s cure through the charity of kind and caring people. We must rapidly raise $150,000 which is the set price of the transplant surgery. And now, it’s the set price of her life. Please! Help us raise the money to save this sweet Girl’s Life!!!
14 Jan 2017
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23 Jan 2015
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*******www***astalvirginiamag****/swa... Coastal Virginia Magazine presents Beef and Bone, named Dish of Hampton Roads at the annual March of Dimes Signature Chefs Auction last October. Executive Chef Scott Simpson of Swan Terrace at The Founders Inn & Spa in Virginia Beach crafted this delicious entree using Grilled Certified Hereford Beef topped with Graham Rollins Crab Claw and Chesapeake She-Crab Beurre Blanc with Hubbs Farm Peanut Crusted Bone Marrow and Bees Knees Apiaries Honey Roasted Local Root Vegetables.
7 Jan 2014
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Phiten, the pioneer of AQUA-METAL™ materials and innovator of metal-infused technology, and professional baseball players C.J. Wilson, Josh Hamilton and J.B. Shuck have teamed up with Be The Match, the nonprofit organization dedicated to helping patients with blood cancers receive life-saving bone marrow and umbilical cord blood transplants. To support Be The Match and raise awareness of the national Be The Match Registry®, Phiten has designed a limited edition Phiten x Be The Match Tornado Necklace with sales benefiting the cause, and the three pro baseball players have been named Ambassadors of Hope by Be The Match. To view Multimedia News Release, go to *******www.multivu****/mnr/64376-phiten-and-mlb-players-for-be-the-match-bone-marrow-donor-registry
20 Nov 2013
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*******www.balancedhealthtoday****/medicardium.html How you would die Large doses of ionizing radiation in a short time period lead to Acute Radiation Syndrome (ARS), aka radiation poisoning. The severity of ARS symptoms depends on the level of exposure . A radiation dose as low as 0.35 Gy could feel a bit like you have the flu expect nausea and vomiting, headaches, fatigue, and fever. If the body is exposed to a higher dose, somewhere between 1-4 Gy, blood cells begin to die. You could still recover treatment of this kind of radiation syndrome usually involves blood transfusions and antibiotics but you could also suffer a weakened immune response due to a drop in white cell count, uncontrollable bleeding due to a lack of platelets, and anemia due to a reduction of red blood cells. You'll also notice a kind of odd sunburn if exposed to 2 Gy or more of ionizing radiation . Technically referred to as acute radiodermatitis, its effects include red patches, peeling skin, and sometimes blistering. Expect it to show up within 24 hours . Between 4 and 8 Gy, however, a dose can be fatal but the route to death still varies on the level of the exposure. Patients at this level suffer vomiting, diarrhea, dizziness, and fever. Without treatment, you could die just a few weeks after exposure. The physicist Louis Slotin , who died of ARS during his 1946 research on the Manhattan Project, was exposed to a radiation dosage estimated to be just over 10 Gy of gamma and x-ray radiation. He wouldn't survive today, even with modern treatments like bone marrow transplants . Patients exposed to radiation between 8 to 30 Gy experience nausea and severe diarrhea within an hour, and they die between 2 days and 2 weeks after exposure. Absorbed doses greater than 30 Gy cause neurological damage . Within minutes, patients experience severe vomiting and diarrhea, dizziness, headaches, and unconsciousness. Seizures and tremors are common, as is ataxia, or the loss of control of voluntary muscle function. Death within 48 hours is inevitable. *******www.balancedhealthtoday****/products.html
8 Jan 2013
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