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1:04
Now it's time to say goodbye to one of the original mouseketeers. Annette Funicello has passed away after a long battle with Multiple Sclerosis that ultimately led to her falling into a coma. Known as the ultimate girl next door to an entire generation, Annette starred on The Original Mickey Mouse Club in the 50s, and then she moved on to become Frankie Avalon's beach buddy in the Beach Party flicks of the 60s. Her husband and three children were by her side when she was taken off life support.
8 Apr 2013
1053
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11:50
Visit *******www.InsideTheMagic**** for more about the Annette Funicello stage dedication! On June 24, 2013, the Walt Disney Studios honored late Mouseketeer, singer, and actress Annette Funicello by naming stage 1 after her, the location where the original Mickey Mouse Club was filmed. On hand for the event were original Mouseketeers, Richard Sherman, Tim Considine and David Stollery (Disney's Spin and Marty), and Frankie Avalon along with Disney CEO, Bob Iger.
4 Sep 2013
221
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1:30
When The Mickey Mouse Club made it's debut on October 3, 1955, it became an instant phenomenon.
28 May 2009
611
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7:17
www.desirootz****
8 May 2011
11869
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0:36
Nibble's Jerry's cousin
8 Mar 2012
5227
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3:13
Myron Floren's Offspring 03:13 An unsettling performance of "The Chicken Dance," performed by dancer and former Mouseketeer Bobby Burgess along with his gawky offspring. Bobby is the son-in-law of the late accordionist Myron Floren, both of whom were long-time performers on "The Lawrence Welk Show." Myron himself provides musical accompaniment after introducing the "performance," which takes place on an eerily barren, dungeon-like stage. This clip has all the classic, premeditated, cornball Welk staginess, minus the talent. Also, everyone has that trademark, desperately forced Welk smile. What fun!
2 Feb 2009
7416
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1:33
The clip the truth comes out Part 2 from The Secret of My Succe$s (1987) with Helen Slater, Richard Jordan No! You went to bed with Brantley? Don't worry, Howard. She's probably got microfilm pictures of the whole thing. What were you doing in bed with my nephew? Whitfield's your nephew? This is Brantley Foster. He works in the mailroom. The mailroom? You mean you're not an executive? Let me get this straight. Brantley is Whitfield? That's right. Brantley is Whitfield. Whitfield is Brantley. And Christy is the bimbo. Well, now that we've had Mouseketeer roll call... I'm just going to go call my lawyer. Wait. Christy is not the bimbo I was screwing around with at the office. People better stop calling me "bimbo. " It was an entirely different bimbo. That's fine. How many bimbos would you say there were? I misspoke myself. There weren't any bimbos at all. Except Christy. Right. No! The question is, how many people did you sleep with to get to the top? That was a very expensive vase, you bitch. Shut up! Now listen. Whatever I did was my business, not yours. No, you mean it was company business. That's right, and that's all it was: business. Let me tell you somethin', sweetheart. You're very good at your job.
26 Oct 2011
2017
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0:40
Alouette Song from Tom And Jerry - The Two Mouseketeers
3 Nov 2011
4492
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8:10
► *******fb.me/XmasFLIX ► Rudolph on DVD ► *******amzn.to/XmasRudy ► FREE XmasFLIX iTunes Video Podcast! ► *******iXmas.mobi Do you believe in Santa Claus? ► *******TrustSanta**** Rudolph The Red-Nosed Reindeer on DVD ► *******amzn.to/XmasRudy The last cartoon ever produced by Max Fleischer who produced the Popeye the Sailor man, Betty Boop and Koko the Clown cartoons from the 1910's to the 1940's. MORE: *******amzn.to/MaxFleischer You know Dasher, Dancer, etc., as the song goes and for the past several decades, you've known Rudolph as well. He's become so familiar a part of the Christmas scene that, like his contemporaries, the gremlins, a lot of people aren't even aware that he only goes back to the early-to-middle 20th century. Rudolph began as an attempt to promote a chain of department stores. It was in 1939 that Montgomery Ward, which had been giving away coloring books every Christmas for years, decided to produce its promotional give-away in-house. Robert L. May, who worked there as an advertising copywriter, was commissioned to write a story for young readers, and the result was Rudolph. May drew on some of his own childhood experiences as a puny kid that other kids sometimes picked on, to craft a story of a picked-on kid who made good, prospering as a result of the very attribute the others made fun of. Though the story, written in the form of rhyming couplets, passed its first test with flying colors, Montgomery Ward's publicity department initially chose not to follow the judgment of May's 4-year-old daughter, to whom he'd read the story aloud as he wrote it. Red noses smacked of drunkenness, they said, which made them inappropriate for a sweet, gentle, parent-friendly Christmas story. But May enlisted illustrator Denver Gillen, a co-worker in the advertising department, to show just how parent-friendly Rudolph could be. With Gillen's artwork, they okayed it after all, and the department store chain gave away 2.4 million copies that year. Millions more were given away over the next several years. Rudolph hit the big screen in 1944. Max Fleischer, in a rare commercial credit following the closure of his studio, produced an animated version of the Rudolph story for The Jam Handy Organization (a Detroit studio that isn't as well known as the ones in Hollywood). That cartoon was shown endlessly on TV during the 1950s and early '60s. Unlike most Rudolph products, it's fallen out of copyright, and is now available on many inexpensive videotapes and DVDs of public domain Christmas shorts. In 1947, May negotiated ownership of the Rudolph property, which had hitherto been held solely by Montgomery Ward. It was shortly afterward that his brother-in-law, Johnny Marks, wrote Rudolph's famous song, first recorded by cowboy star Gene Autry in 1949. The recording not only sold two million copies that year. The most familiar of Rudolph's media adaptations. Next came the comic book, which recounted Rudolph's subsequent adventures, after he'd become a part of Santa Claus's team. DC Comics published a new issue each December from 1950-62. Most were drawn by Rube Grossman (Peter Panda, Three Mouseketeers). The DC version was briefly revived in 1972 as a tabloid, written and drawn by Sheldon Mayer (Sugar & Spike, The Red Tornado). While the DC version was running, Little Golden Books produced its own version of the story, and followed it with Rudolph the Red-Nosed Reindeer Shines Again. Rankin/Bass Productions (Thundercats, Silverhawks) did the best-known animated version, the one narrated by Burl Ives as Sam the Snowman, which debuted on NBC December 6, 1964. Rather than traditional cel animation, they used a stop-motion technique with puppets, similar to George Pal's Puppetoons, but which they promoted under the trademarked name "Animagic". Rudolph's voice was done by Billie Mae Richards (Bobby in King Kong). Richards reprised her role in a couple of follow-ups, Rudolph's Shiny New Year (1976) and Rudolph & Frosty's Christmas in July (1979). Long surpassed by the 1964 Rankin / Bass version, this 1948 animated version of Rudolph the Red-Nosed Reindeer directed by Max Fleischer is enjoyable in its own right. Narrated by Paul Wing, the story begins with the lead character already not allowed to skate on ice with the others (all of whom wear pillows on their backs to break their falls). Copyright Disclaimer: Under Section 107 of the Copyright Act 1976, allowance is made for "fair use" for purposes such as criticism, comment, news reporting, teaching, scholarship, and research. Fair use is a use permitted by copyright statute that might otherwise be infringing. Non-profit, educational or personal use tips the balance in favor of fair use. ► *******XmasFLIX**** ► Max Fleischer ► *******amzn.to/MaxFleischer
24 Nov 2011
3096
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2:11
Here is a groovin' version of the Mickey Mouse March by the Mike Curb Congregation. It was released as a single in 1974 by Buena Vista Records and is on the Disneyland LP, Mickey Mouse Club Mousekedances and other Mouseketeer Favorites STER-1362. This song was also heard on the TV special, HERBIE DAY AT DISNEYLAND with Bob McAllister. Enjoy and comment
2 Dec 2011
5403
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4:39
FlickMojo This talented and hunky Canadian star began as a Mouseketeer, and continues to win hearts with his varied roles. Join Watchmojo**** as we explore the career of Ryan Gosling.
7 Jan 2012
194
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1:04
CelebTV Now it's time to say goodbye to one of the original mouseketeers. Annette Funicello has passed away after a long battle with Multiple Sclerosis.
8 Apr 2013
139
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0:00
Entertainment Tonight Season: 32 Annette Funicello passed away at 70 today due to complications from Multiple Sclerosis following a 25-year battle with the disease. Back in 1992, after the former Disney Mouseketeer and beach movie icon announced that she was struggling with MS...
8 Apr 2013
517
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0:58
Annette Funicello first came into American homes in the 1950's as the most popular of the Mouseketeers. She spent the last 25 years of her life fighting multiple sclerosis. Annette Funicello was 70. Scott Pelley reports.
9 Apr 2013
95
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2:44
Annette Funicello, the former Mouseketeer, movie star and peanut butter pitch-person, died at a California hospital at the age of 70. CBS News' Ben Tracy looks at her impact on pop culture.
9 Apr 2013
283
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9:07
Rudolph The Red-Nosed Reindeer ► *******amzn.to/XmasRudy ► *******XmasFLIX**** ► *******facebook****/XmasFLIX MP3s ► *******XmasTRAX**** ► Mobile ► *******iXmas.mobi Do you believe in Santa Claus? ► *******TrustSanta**** The last cartoon ever produced by Max Fleischer who produced the Popeye the Sailor man, Betty Boop and Koko the Clown cartoons from the 1910's to the 1940's. MORE: *******amzn.to/MaxFleischer You know Dasher, Dancer, etc., as the song goes and for the past several decades, you've known Rudolph as well. He's become so familiar a part of the Christmas scene that, like his contemporaries, the gremlins, a lot of people aren't even aware that he only goes back to the early-to-middle 20th century. Rudolph began as an attempt to promote a chain of department stores. It was in 1939 that Montgomery Ward, which had been giving away coloring books every Christmas for years, decided to produce its promotional give-away in-house. Robert L. May, who worked there as an advertising copywriter, was commissioned to write a story for young readers, and the result was Rudolph. May drew on some of his own childhood experiences as a puny kid that other kids sometimes picked on, to craft a story of a picked-on kid who made good, prospering as a result of the very attribute the others made fun of. Though the story, written in the form of rhyming couplets, passed its first test with flying colors, Montgomery Ward's publicity department initially chose not to follow the judgment of May's 4-year-old daughter, to whom he'd read the story aloud as he wrote it. Red noses smacked of drunkenness, they said, which made them inappropriate for a sweet, gentle, parent-friendly Christmas story. But May enlisted illustrator Denver Gillen, a co-worker in the advertising department, to show just how parent-friendly Rudolph could be. With Gillen's artwork, they okayed it after all, and the department store chain gave away 2.4 million copies that year. Millions more were given away over the next several years. Rudolph hit the big screen in 1944. Max Fleischer, in a rare commercial credit following the closure of his studio, produced an animated version of the Rudolph story for The Jam Handy Organization (a Detroit studio that isn't as well known as the ones in Hollywood). That cartoon was shown endlessly on TV during the 1950s and early '60s. Unlike most Rudolph products, it's fallen out of copyright, and is now available on many inexpensive videotapes and DVDs of public domain Christmas shorts. In 1947, May negotiated ownership of the Rudolph property, which had hitherto been held solely by Montgomery Ward. It was shortly afterward that his brother-in-law, Johnny Marks, wrote Rudolph's famous song, first recorded by cowboy star Gene Autry in 1949. The recording not only sold two million copies that year. The most familiar of Rudolph's media adaptations. Next came the comic book, which recounted Rudolph's subsequent adventures, after he'd become a part of Santa Claus's team. DC Comics published a new issue each December from 1950-62. Most were drawn by Rube Grossman (Peter Panda, Three Mouseketeers). The DC version was briefly revived in 1972 as a tabloid, written and drawn by Sheldon Mayer (Sugar & Spike, The Red Tornado). While the DC version was running, Little Golden Books produced its own version of the story, and followed it with Rudolph the Red-Nosed Reindeer Shines Again. Rankin/Bass Productions (Thundercats, Silverhawks) did the best-known animated version, the one narrated by Burl Ives as Sam the Snowman, which debuted on NBC December 6, 1964. Rather than traditional cel animation, they used a stop-motion technique with puppets, similar to George Pal's Puppetoons, but which they promoted under the trademarked name "Animagic". Rudolph's voice was done by Billie Mae Richards (Bobby in King Kong). Richards reprised her role in a couple of follow-ups, Rudolph's Shiny New Year (1976) and Rudolph & Frosty's Christmas in July (1979). Long surpassed by the 1964 Rankin / Bass version, this 1948 animated version of Rudolph the Red-Nosed Reindeer directed by Max Fleischer is enjoyable in its own right. Narrated by Paul Wing, the story begins with the lead character already not allowed to skate on ice with the others (all of whom wear pillows on their backs to break their falls). Copyright Disclaimer: Under Section 107 of the Copyright Act 1976, allowance is made for "fair use" for purposes such as criticism, comment, news reporting, teaching, scholarship, and research. Fair use is a use permitted by copyright statute that might otherwise be infringing. Non-profit, educational or personal use tips the balance in favor of fair use. ► *******XmasFLIX**** ► Max Fleischer ► *******amzn.to/MaxFleischer Do you believe in Santa Claus? ► *******TrustSanta**** Rudolph The Red-Nosed Reindeer on DVD ► *******amzn.to/XmasRudy
7 Dec 2013
4224
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