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Balanced Health Today Call Now 1(888)277-4980 Lymph nodes are small, bean-shaped glands throughout the body. They are part of the lymph system, which carries fluid lymph fluid, nutrients, and waste material between the body tissues and the bloodstream. The lymph system is an important part of the immune system, the body's defense system against disease. The lymph nodes filter lymph fluid as it flows through them, trapping bacteria, viruses, and other foreign substances, which are then destroyed by special white blood cells called lymphocytes. Lymph nodes may be found singly or in groups. And they may be as small as the head of a pin or as large as an olive. Groups of lymph nodes can be felt in the neck, groin, and underarms. Lymph nodes generally are not tender or painful. Most lymph nodes in the body cannot be felt. Our bodies have a network of lymph vessels and lymph nodes. Lymph is pronounced limf. This network is a part of the body’s immune system. It collects fluid, waste material, and other things like viruses and bacteria) that are in the body tissues, outside the bloodstream. Lymph vessels are a lot like the veins that collect and carry blood through the body. But instead of carrying blood, these vessels carry the clear watery fluid called lymph. Lymph fluid flows out from capillary walls to bathe the body’s tissue cells. It carries oxygen and other nutrients to the cells, and carries away waste products like carbon dioxide CO2 that flow out of the cells. Lymph fluid also contains white blood cells, which help fight infections. Lymph fluid would build up and cause swelling if it were not drained in some way. That’s the role of the lymph vessels. Lymph vessels draw up the lymph fluid from around the cells to send it towards the chest. There, lymph fluid collects into a large vessel that drains into a blood vessel near the heart.
28 Apr 2017
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Balanced Health Today Call Now 1(888)277-4980 The spleen is a brownish fist-sized organ located in the upper left side of the abdomen, tucked into a space between the stomach, pancreas and left kidney. It’s one of those organs that people know about, but aren’t sure what it does. Essentially, the spleen is a storage container and filter for blood, though it is part of the lymphatic system. In fact, it’s the largest lymph node in the body. One of its tasks is to remove harmful bacteria and viruses in the blood stream. Its other major task is removing or storing certain blood cells. The spleen is not part of the digestive system however is connected to the blood vessels of both the stomach and the pancreas. The spleen is situated on the left side of our body; under the ribs and above the stomach. It is a part of the lymphatic system and can weigh between 150 – 200 grams in a healthy adult and is approximately 10-12 cm in its longest dimension. Two types of spleen tissue: red pulp and white pulp The spleen is composed of two primary regions namely, red pulp and white pulp. The red pulp makes up for little more than three-fourth of the spleen. A region designated marginal zone is a transition area that separates it from the white pulp. Red pulp Red pulp is red because it has many small cavities sinusoids where the spleen stores blood in case of injury or other situations where the body needs extra blood. This blood reserve has a high count of platelets, an essential component for blood coagulation to help stop bleeding. Red pulp also removes and recycles components of old, damaged and dead red blood cells. White pulp White pulp is associated with the lymphatic function of the spleen. Most of this tissue consists of lymph-related nodules, called Malphighian corpuscles. The white pulp works as part of the immune system, producing antibodies immunoglobin that recognize and neutralize harmful antigens bacteria and viruses in the blood. It also produces and stores white
25 Apr 2017
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Balanced Health Today Call Now 1(888)277-4980 LYMPHATIC SYSTEM The lymphatic system is a vascular network of tubules and ducts that collect, filter, and return lymph to blood circulation. Lymph is a clear fluid that comes from blood plasma, which exits blood vessels at capillary beds. This fluid becomes the interstitial fluid that surrounds cells. Lymph contains water, proteins, salts, lipids, white blood cells, and other substances that must be returned to the blood. The primary functions of the lymphatic system are to drain and return interstitial fluid to the blood, to absorb and return lipids from the digestive system to the blood, and to filter fluid of pathogens, damaged cells, cellular debris, and cancerous cells. Lymphatic System Structures The major components of the lymphatic system include lymph, lymphatic vessels, and lymphatic organs that contain lymphoid tissues. Lymphatic Vessels Lymphatic vessels are structures that absorb fluid that diffuses from blood vessel capillaries into surrounding tissues. This fluid is directed toward lymph nodes to be filtered and ultimately re-enters blood circulation through veins located near the heart. The smallest lymphatic vessels are called lymph capillaries. Lymphatic capillaries come together to form larger lymphatic vessels. Lymphatic vessels from various regions of the body merge to form larger vessels called lymphatic trunks. Lymphatic trunks merge to form two larger lymphatic ducts. Lymphatic ducts return lymph to blood circulation by draining lymph into the subclavian veins in the neck. Lymph Nodes Lymphatic vessels transport lymph to lymph nodes. These structures filter lymph of pathogens, such as bacteria and viruses . Lymph nodes also filter cellular waste, dead cells, and cancerous cells. Lymph nodes house immune cells called lymphocytes. These cells are necessary for the development of humoral immunity defense prior to cell infection and cell-mediated immunity defense after cell infection. Lymph
23 Apr 2017
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Balanced Health Today Call Now 1(888)277-4980 The major components of the lymphatic system include lymph, lymphatic vessels, and lymphatic organs that contain lymphoid tissues. Lymphatic Vessels Lymphatic vessels are structures that absorb fluid that diffuses from blood vessel capillaries into surrounding tissues. This fluid is directed toward lymph nodes to be filtered and ultimately re-enters blood circulation through veins located near the heart. The smallest lymphatic vessels are called lymph capillaries. Lymphatic capillaries come together to form larger lymphatic vessels. Lymphatic vessels from various regions of the body merge to form larger vessels called lymphatic trunks. Lymphatic trunks merge to form two larger lymphatic ducts. Lymphatic ducts return lymph to blood circulation by draining lymph into the subclavian veins in the neck. Lymph Nodes Lymphatic vessels transport lymph to lymph nodes. These structures filter lymph of pathogens, such as bacteria and viruses . Lymph nodes also filter cellular waste, dead cells, and cancerous cells. Lymph nodes house immune cells called lymphocytes. These cells are necessary for the development of humoral immunity (defense prior to cell infection) and cell-mediated immunity (defense after cell infection). Lymph enters a node through afferent lymphatic vessels, filters as it passes through channels in the node called sinuses, and leaves the node through an efferent lymphatic vessel. Thymus The thymus gland is the main organ of the lymphatic system. Its primary function is to promote the development of specific cells of the immune system called T-lymphocytes. Once mature, these cells leave the thymus and are transported via blood vessels to the lymph nodes and spleen. T-lymphocytes are responsible for cell-mediated immunity, which is an immune response that involves the activation of certain immune cells to fight infection. In addition to immune function, the thymus also produces hormones that promote growth and
19 Apr 2017
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Balanced Health Today Call Now 1(888)277-4980 The lymphatic system includes a system of lymphatic capillaries, vessels, nodes, and ducts that collects and transports lymph, which is a clear to slightly yellowish fluid, similar to the plasma in blood. The lymphatic system is important for maintaining your body’s fluid balance, and it helps transport some fats. It also works along with the rest of the immune system namely, the leukocytes to fight infections. In addition to being present in the lymph nodes, lymphatic tissue is also found in a few additional spaces of your body. The lymphoid organs assist the lymphatic system. They include the thymus, spleen, tonsils, and appendix, along with some special tissue in the gut: The thymus The thymus is located in the thoracic cavity, just under the neck. It’s made up of two lobes of lymphoid tissue. Each lobe has a medulla surrounded by a cortex. The cortex is where immature lymphocytes first go to become T cells, but their maturation finishes in the medulla. The thymus is large during childhood, but during the early teen years it starts to decrease in size. Why does it get smaller or to be more clinical, involute? No one knows it’s still a mystery. The spleen The spleen is located in the upper-left part of the abdomen. It’s tucked up under the ribs, so you generally can’t palpate it medically examine by touch unless it’s enlarged. The spleen’s main function is to filter the blood. It removes old or damaged red blood cells, which are phagocytized by macrophages. The spleen also detects viruses and bacteria and triggers the release of lymphocytes. The tonsils The tonsils are masses of lymphoid tissue found in the back of the throat and nasal cavity. They’re part of the immune system, so they help fight infections, but removing the tonsils doesn’t appear to increase your risk of infections. Tonsillitis occurs when the tonsils become infected. They’re usually easy to see by shining a light into your patient’s
19 Apr 2017
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Balanced Health Today Call Now 1(888)277-4980 Certain diseases can affect the lymph nodes, the spleen, or the collections of lymphoid tissue in certain areas of the body. Lymphadenopathy. This is a condition where the lymph nodes become swollen or enlarged, usually because of a nearby infection. Swollen lymph nodes in the neck, for example, can be caused by a throat infection. Once the infection is treated, the swelling usually goes away. If several lymph node groups throughout the body are swollen, that can indicate a more serious disease that needs further investigation by a doctor. Lymphadenitis. Also called adenitis, this inflammation of the lymph node is caused by an infection of the tissue in the node. The infection can cause the skin overlying the lymph node to swell, redden, and feel warm and tender to the touch. It usually affects the lymph nodes in the neck and is often caused by a bacterial infection that can be easily treated with an antibiotic. Lymphomas. These cancers start in the lymph nodes when lymphocytes undergo changes and start to multiply out of control. The lymph nodes swell, and the cancer cells crowd out healthy cells and may cause tumors solid growths in other parts of the body. Splenomegaly enlarged spleen. In someone who is healthy, the spleen is usually small enough that it can't be felt when you press on the abdomen. But certain diseases can cause the spleen to swell to several times its normal size. Most commonly, this is due to a viral infection, such as mononucleosis. But in some cases, more serious diseases such as cancer can cause the spleen to expand. If you have an enlarged spleen, your doctor will probably tell you to avoid contact sports like football for a while. If you're hit, the swollen spleen is vulnerable to rupturing bursting. And if it ruptures, it can cause a huge amount of blood to be lost. Tonsillitis. Tonsillitis is caused by an infection of the tonsils, the lymphoid tissues in the back of the mouth at the to
19 Apr 2017
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Balanced Health Today Call Now 1(888)277-4980 Carrying Away Waste Lymph fluid drains into tiny vessels called lymph capillaries. The fluid is then pushed along through the capillaries when a person breathes or the muscles contract. The lymph capillaries are very thin. They have many tiny openings that let gases, water, and nutrients pass through to the surrounding cells, nourishing them and taking away waste products. When lymph fluid passes through in this way it is called interstitial fluid. Lymph vessels collect the interstitial fluid and then return it to the bloodstream by emptying it into large veins in the upper chest, near the neck. Fighting Infection Lymph fluid enters the lymph nodes, where macrophages fight off foreign bodies like bacteria, removing them from the bloodstream. After these substances have been filtered out, the lymph fluid leaves the lymph nodes and returns to the veins, where it re-enters the bloodstream. When a person has an infection, germs collect in the lymph nodes. If the throat is infected, for example, the lymph nodes of the neck may swell. That's why doctors check for swollen lymph nodes sometime called swollen glands but they're actually lymph nodes in the neck when your throat is infected.
17 Apr 2017
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Balanced Health Today Call Now 1(888)277-4980 The lymphatic system is an extensive drainage network that helps keep bodily fluid levels in balance and defends the body against infections. The lymphatic system is made up of a network of lymphatic vessels. These vessels carry lymph — a clear, watery fluid containing protein molecules, salts, glucose, urea, and other substances throughout the body. The spleen is located in the upper left part of the abdomen under the ribcage. It works as part of the lymphatic system to protect the body, clearing worn-out red blood cells and other foreign bodies from the bloodstream to help fight off infection. Why They're Important One of the lymphatic system's major jobs is to collect extra lymph fluid from body tissues and return it to the blood. This process is important because water, proteins, and other substances are continuously leaking out of tiny blood capillaries into the surrounding body tissues. If the lymphatic system didn't drain the excess fluid, it would build up in the body's tissues and they would swell. The lymphatic system also helps defend the body against germs like viruses, bacteria, and fungi that can cause illnesses. Those germs are filtered out in the lymph nodes, which are small masses of tissue located along the network of lymph vessels. The nodes house lymphocytes, a type of white blood cell. Some of those lymphocytes make antibodies, special proteins that fight off germs and stop infections from spreading by trapping disease-causing germs and destroying them. The spleen also helps the body fight infection. The spleen contains lymphocytes and another kind of white blood cell called macrophages, which engulf and destroy bacteria, dead tissue, and foreign matter and remove them from the blood passing through the spleen. The lymphatic system is a network of very small tubes vessels that drain lymph fluid from all over the body. The major parts of the lymph tissue are located in the bone marrow, spleen,
16 Apr 2017
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Balanced Health Today Call Now 1(888)277-4980 What Is Lymph Node Inflammation? Lymph nodes, or lymph glands, are small, oval-shaped organs that contain immune cells to attack and kill foreign invaders, such as viruses. They are an important part of the body’s immune system. Lymph nodes are found in various parts of the body, including the neck, armpits, and groin. They are linked by lymphatic vessels, which carry lymph a clear fluid containing white blood cells and dead and diseased tissue for disposal throughout the body. The primary function of lymph nodes is to harbor the body’s disease-fighting cells. When you are sick and your lymph nodes send out disease-fighting cells and compounds, they may become inflamed or painful. The condition of having inflamed lymph nodes is referred to as lymphadenitis. Lymph node inflammation can occur for a variety of reasons. Any infection or virus, including the common cold, can cause your lymph nodes to swell. Cancer–including blood cancer–can also cause lymph node inflammation. What Are the Symptoms of Lymph Node Inflammation? Lymph node inflammation can cause a variety of symptoms, depending on the cause of the swelling and the location of the swollen lymph nodes. Common symptoms accompanying lymph node inflammation include: upper respiratory symptoms, such as a fever, runny nose, or sore throat tender, swollen lymph glands in the neck, armpits, and groin limb swelling could indicate lymph system blockage night sweats hardening and expansion of the lymph nodes could indicate the presence of a tumor
13 Apr 2017
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Balanced Health Today Call Now 1(888)277-4980 A swollen lymph node can be as small as the size of a pea and as large as the size of a cherry. Swollen lymph nodes can be painful to the touch, or they can hurt when you make certain movements. Swollen lymph nodes under the jaw or on either side of the neck may hurt when you turn your head in a certain way or when you’re chewing food. They can often be felt simply by running your hand over your neck just below your jawline. They may be tender. Swollen lymph nodes in the groin may cause pain when walking or bending. Other symptoms that may be present along with swollen lymph nodes are: coughing fatigue fever chills runny nose sweating If you experience any of these symptoms, or if you have painful swollen lymph nodes and no other symptoms, consult your doctor. Lymph nodes that are swollen but not tender can be signs of a serious problem, such as cancer. In some cases, the swollen lymph node will get smaller as other symptoms go away. If a lymph node is swollen and painful or if the swelling lasts more than a few days, see your doctor.
12 Apr 2017
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Balanced Health Today Call Now 1(888)277-4980 To diagnose HD, your doctor will perform a physical exam and ask you about your medical history. Your doctor will also order certain tests to make a proper diagnosis. The following tests may be done: * imaging tests, such as X-rays or CT scans * lymph node biopsy, which involves removing a piece of lymph node tissue to test for the presence of abnormal cells * blood tests, such as a complete blood count CBC, to measure levels of red blood cells, white blood cells, and platelets * immunophenotyping to determine the type of lymphoma cells that are present * lung function tests to determine how well your lungs are working * an echocardiogram to determine how well your heart is working * bone marrow biopsy, which involves the removal and examination of marrow inside your bones to see if the cancer has spread Staging Once an HD diagnosis has been made, the cancer is assigned a stage. Staging describes the extent and severity of the disease. It will help your doctor determine your treatment options and outlook. There are four general stages of HD: * Stage I early stage means that cancer is found in one lymph node region. * Stage II locally advanced disease means that cancer is found in two lymph node regions on one side of the diaphragm, which is the muscle beneath your lung. It may also indicate that cancer was found in one lymph node region as well as in a nearby organ. * Stage III advanced disease means that cancer is found in lymph node regions both above and below your diaphragm. It may also indicate that cancer was found in one lymph node area and in one organ on opposite sides of your diaphragm. * Stage IV widespread disease means that cancer was found outside the lymph nodes and has spread to other parts of your body, such as your bone marrow, liver, or lung.
11 Apr 2017
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Balanced Health Today Call Now 1(888)277-4980 A lymph node is a small, round or bean-shaped cluster of cells covered by a capsule of connective tissue. The cells are a combination of lymphocytes which produce protein particles that capture invaders, such as viruses and macrophages, which break down the captured material. Lymphocytes and macrophages filter your lymphatic fluid as it travels through your body and protect you by destroying invaders. Lymph nodes are located in groups, and each group drains a specific area of your body. You may be more likely to notice swelling in certain areas, such as in the lymph nodes in your neck, under your chin, in your armpits and in your groin. The site of the swollen lymph nodes may help identify the underlying cause. The most common cause of swollen lymph nodes is an infection, particularly a viral infection, such as the common cold. Other possible causes of swollen lymph nodes include: Common infections * Strep throat * Measles * Ear infections * Infected (abscessed) tooth * Mononucleosis * Skin or wound infections, such as cellulitis * Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) — the virus that causes AIDS Uncommon infections * Tuberculosis * Syphilis * Toxoplasmosis — a parasitic infection resulting from contact with the feces of an infected cat or eating undercooked meat * Cat scratch fever — a bacterial infection from a cat scratch or bite Immune system disorders * Lupus — a chronic inflammatory disease that can target your joints, skin, kidneys, blood cells, heart and lungs * Rheumatoid arthritis — a chronic inflammatory disease that targets the tissue that lines your joints (synovium) Cancers * Lymphoma — cancer that originates in your lymphatic system * Leukemia — cancer of your body's blood-forming tissue, including your bone marrow and lymphatic system * Other cancers that have spread (metastasized ) to lymph nodes Other possible but rare causes include certain medications, such as the anti-seizure medication
9 Apr 2017
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Balanced Health Today Call Now 1(888)277-4980 Lymphatic disease is a class of disorders which directly affect the components of the lymphatic system. Examples include Castleman's disease[1] and lymphedema.[2] Diseases and disorder Hodgkin's Disease/Hodgkin's Lymphoma This is a type of cancer of the lymphatic system. It can start almost anywhere in the body. It is believed to be caused by HIV, Epstein-Barr Syndrome, age and family history. Symptoms include weight loss, fever, swollen lymph nodes, night sweats, itchy skin, fatigue, chest pain, coughing or trouble swallowing. Non-Hodgkin's Lymphoma Lymphoma is a usually malignant cancer. It is caused by the body producing too many abnormal white blood cells. It is not the same as Hodgkin's Disease. Symptoms usually include painless, enlarged lymph node or nodes in the neck, weakness, fever, weight loss, and anemia. Lymphadenitis is an infection of the lymph nodes usually caused by a virus, bacteria or fungi. Symptoms include redness or swelling around the lymph node. Lymphangitis Lymphangitis is an inflammation of the lymph vessels. Symptoms usually include swelling, redness, warmth, pain or red streaking around the affected area. Lymphedema Lymphedema is the chronic pooling of lymph fluid in the tissue. It usually starts in the feet or lower legs. It's also a side-effect of some surgical procedures. Lymphocytosis Lymphocytosis is a high lymphocyte count. It can be caused by an infection, blood cancer, lymphoma, or autoimmune disorders that are accompanied by chronic swelling.
1 Apr 2017
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Balanced Health Today Call Now 1(888)277-4980 Lymph Drainage Massage Lymphatic Drainage Massage (LDT) encourages the body to process and remove stagnant fluid, toxins and wastes as a result of improved lymph flow. As lymph fluid passes through lymph nodes, the body generates production of more lymphocytes to reinforce immune response and support antibodies against foreign substances. The lymphatic system collects excess fluids in the body and serves as a filtering system to screen out foreign pathogens. This system is a networked chain of vessels spaced throughout the body that drains lymph fluid from surrounding tissues and discharges it back into the bloodstream. The main functions of the lymph system are to manage fluid levels and filter out bacteria, as well as containing leukocytes (white blood cells) as part of the immune system. Lymph fluid is filtered through the spleen, thymus gland, and lymph nodes before being emptied back into the blood. Lymphatic flow can stagnate for many reasons such as swelling, chronic inflammation, lack of physical activity, stress, age, fatigue, and tight-fitting clothing. Diminished lymph circulation results in less effective cell regeneration. This permits toxins and proteins to accumulate around the cells, leading to cellular de-oxygenation. The lymph system collects excess fluids in the body and serves as a filtering system to screen out foreign pathogens. This system is a networked chain of vessels spaced throughout the body that drains lymph fluid from surrounding tissues and discharges it back into the bloodstream. The main functions of the lymphatic system are to manage fluid levels and filter out bacteria, as well as containing leukocytes (white blood cells) as part of the immune system. Lymph fluid is filtered through the spleen, thymus gland, and lymph nodes before being emptied back into the blood. Lymphatic flow can stagnate for many reasons such as swelling, chronic inflammation, lack of physical activity,
31 Mar 2017
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Balanced Health Today Call Now 1(888)277-4980 Lymphatic drainage is the natural function of the lymphatic system, which is an essential part of immunity. If this function isn't working properly, it can cause a build-up of fluid in tissues as well as more serious medical problems like lymphagitis and lymphoma. Though most of the conditions caused by poor lymphatic drainage are treatable, some require prompt hospitalization and immediate medical care, since they can easily spread throughout the body. There is also a type of therapeutic massage called Lymphatic Drainage Therapy (LDT) to help this system work and to treat some of the conditions associated with the lymphatic system. Lymphatic System The lymphatic system is made up of a network of thin tubes that run throughout the body called lymph vessels and oval-shaped organs called lymph nodes, which collect and filter lymph. As blood flows throughout the body, a thin, yellow fluid called plasma leaks out from blood vessels and mixes with interstitial fluid and water to surround the cells in different tissues. This mixture contains food for the cells, blood cells that are important for immunity, and also waste put out by the cells. It drains into the lymph vessels, after which it is called lymph, and is then transported to lymph nodes, which contain immune cells. Since the lymphatic system doesn't have any way to move the fluid on its own, it relies on the movement from muscles in the body to push the fluid along, and valves to keep the fluid going in the right direction. Once in the lymph nodes, the fluid is filtered, any disease-causing organisms are killed. Other organs that work with this system include the spleen, which takes out dead or damaged red blood cells and contains white blood cells to fight disease, and the thymus, which produces more white blood cells. The tonsils and adenoids also work with this system and protect the digestive system and respiratory system specifically.
29 Mar 2017
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Balanced Health Today Call Now 1(888)277-4980 What is the lymphatic system? It’s a critical part of the immune system, vital for protecting us from illness and damaging, disease-causing inflammation. Essentially, the lymphatic system is the the body’s inner “drainage system,” a network of blood vessels and lymph nodes that carry fluids from tissues around the body into the blood and vice versa. The lymphatic system has the primary role of protecting the body against outside threats such as infections, bacteria and cancer cells while helping keep fluid levels in balance. The best way to protect the complex series of criss-crossing lymphatic vessels and “nodes” that span almost the entire body (every one except for the central nervous system) is to eat a healing diet, exercise and take steps to detoxify the body naturally. Lymphatic vessels carry fluid that is managed through “valves,” which stop fluid from traveling the wrong way, similar to how blood flow works within the arteries and veins. In fact, the lymphatic system is very similar to the circulatory system made up of branches of veins, arteries and capillaries both bring essential fluids around the whole body and are vital for keeping us alive. In comparison to veins, lymph vessels are much smaller, and instead of bringing blood throughout the body, the lymphatic system carries a liquid called lymph, which stores our while blood cells. (1) Lymph is a clear, watery fluid and also carries protein molecules, salts, glucose and other substances, along with bacteria, throughout the body.
28 Mar 2017
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