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1:21
Federal safety officials are looking at how pilot training and the use of automation in the cockpit may have played a role in the deadly crash landing of a Boeing 777 at San Francisco International Airport in July. Tara Mergener reports.
11 Dec 2013
177
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0:19
The National Transportation Safety Board is investigating a small plane crash in Fresno, Calif. The Cessna went down just 800 feet from the runway of a small airport Thursday night. The two people aboard were killed. The victims were a man and a boy, reportedly the pilot's nephew. No one on the ground was hurt. Vinita Nair reports.
27 Dec 2013
129
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0:26
Two Southwest airlines pilots who landed at the wrong airport are grounded. Norah O'Donnell reports.
14 Jan 2014
103
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0:51
Delta Air Lines Flight 1141 was a flight that flew from Jackson to Dallas-Fort Worth International Airport to Salt Lake City International Airport in Salt Lake City, Utah. On August 31, 1988, Flight 1141 crashed after takeoff from Dallas-Fort Worth Airport. Two of the seven crew members and twelve of the 101 passengers on board lost their lives. On this occasion, the aircraft was a Boeing 727 Advanced, registration number N473DA. It was delivered in 1973, the 992nd Boeing 727 to be delivered. Two facts were primarily blamed for the tragedy of flight 1141: The crew had not ensured that the wing's flaps were properly positioned for take-off, and the plane's unprepared take-off horn was not functioning. As a result, the plane struck a nearby object immediately after taking off, causing the accident. In an unexpected sequel to the investigation, the broadcast of the cockpit voice recorder (CVR) by the media demonstrating why the crew mistakenly mispositioned the flaps, provoked such an outcry by pilots, that subsequent releases of CVR data are protected by law and are carefully vetted by the NTSB. FAA regulations require a sterile cockpit before takeoff. This means there is to be no conversation outside of talk pertaining to the plane and pending flight. (For example, reviewing Pre-Takeoff checklists.) The CVR tapes recorded extensive talk about the pilots' mixed beverages and the dating habits of the flight attendants. After impact, the aircraft broke into two peices and skidded to a stop some four thousand feet from the end of the runway. As evacuation procedures were begun, a fire broke out near the fuel lines to the engines in the rear of the aircraft. Out of the 108 passengers and crew aboard, 14 did not live to tell their story. The Captain was the last person to leave the aircraft alive, removed some 45 minutes after the accident.
24 May 2009
11352
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0:00
On June 7, 2006 at approximately 7:03 AM local, a Trade Winds cargo Boeing B747-200, N922FT, overran the end of RW 18 after aborting the takeoff due to an engine failure at Medellin - Jose Maria Cordova Airport (SKRG), Rio Negro, Colombia. There were no injuries to the 6 crewmembers onboard. The airplane was substantially damaged. The METAR was wind calm visibility 7000 VCSH BKN008 SCT 080 16/14 A3037. The investigation is being conducted by the Aeronautica Civil, Republica de Columbia. The US NTSB is assisting the Columbian investigation under the provisions of ICAO Annex 13. Link to the NTSB report: http://www.ntsb.gov/ntsb/GenPDF.asp?id
24 May 2009
34617
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3:13
Audio only with annotations from transcript. Courtesy FAA, NTSB and Con Edison. FAA Flight 1549 data page: http://www.faa.gov/data%5Fstatistics/accident%5Fincident/1549/ NTSB explanation: http://www.ntsb.gov/Pressrel/2009/090206.html
13 Feb 2009
8425
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3:34
3/22/2009 Latest: 2 Fedex crew members dead on jet crash. On phone with Retired AA Pilot, John Ehrlich & Captain Chuck Nash reviewing possible causes/technicalities on landing, bouncing, bursting into flames and crash amid heavy winds! HQ: http://itskylineblog.blogspot.com/200... Plane was an MD-11 and on a regular flight from China. Flight 80. On March 23, 2009, FedEx Express Flight 80, a FedEx Express McDonnell Douglas MD-11 cargo jet on a flight from Guangzhou Baiyun International Airport, People's Republic of China, crash-landed at Narita International Airport in Narita, Chiba Prefecture, Japan at 6:48 a.m.The plane was landing during high winds, with gusts estimated at 40 to 50 mph. Upon hitting the ground the aircraft bounced twice on the airport's Runway A (34L). It finally flipped over and burst into flames. Firefighters were immediately dispatched to the blazing cargo plane, and the airport was closed. The fire destroyed the majority of the aircraft. The runway was closed for several hours, and as a result several international flights were cancelled, while many inbound arrivals were diverted to other airports.[2][3] The two flight crew members, pilot Kevin Mosley, and his copilot, Anthony Stephen-Pino were both taken to a local hospital where they were pronounced dead. They were the only fatalities in the accident. The National Transportation Safety Board (NTSB) has said it is sending a team to Japan to assist with the investigation.[The crash was FedEx's first fatal accident involving a jet aircraft, as well as the first fatal accident at Narita Airport. he 4,000-meter Runway A (16R/34L) was closed for many hours, leaving the 2,180-meter Runway B (16L/34R) as the only operable runway at the airport. As a result many flights operated by larger aircraft had to be canceled or diverted to other airports.[2][3] There were two fatalities in the accident: the two flight crew members, 54-year old Captain Kevin Mosley of Hillsboro, Oregon, U.S., and 49-year old First Officer Anthony Stephen Pino of San Antonio, Texas, U.S.,[4] were both taken to Narita Red Cross Hospital where they were pronounced dead. They were the only people on board. Japan's Aircraft and Railway Accidents Investigation Commission is currently investigating the incident. The United States' National Transportation Safety Board (NTSB) has said it is sending a team to Japan to assist with the investigation.[3][5][6] The crash was FedEx's first fatal accident involving a jet aircraft, as well as the first fatal accident at Narita Airport.[3][7] Built in January, 1993, the aircraft was formerly operated in passenger service by Delta Air Lines as N813DE.[8] After several years in storage at Litchfield Municipal Airport in Phoenix, Arizona,[9] it was acquired and converted to a freighter by FedEx in 2006.
29 Apr 2009
5688
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9:04
Major Keyvan Nourhaghighi's Video: On JAN 15/09 US Airways crashed on the Hudson River was Pilot Negligence due to numbers of reasons: 1) Canada Geese immigration is from September to November not in January! 2) Goose Wng span is 51 IN Pilot could SEE & AVOIDE IT; 3) PIlot must have LOOK OUT to avoide Birds; 4) Bird could not cause Both Engine Fire; 5) Witnesses heard huge blast but saw NO bird. 6) Pilot made false Bird report 7) Pilot did not open Liferafts & neglected to Land at the same airport LaGuardia, with 3800 feet make a simple Tear Drop, Pilot did not order Life Rafts to be opened, Pilot made made false bird hits report, Pilot puts lives of crew & passengers in danger thus FAA & NTSB MUST Charge Pilot and Suspended his License. Major Keyvan Nourhaghighi, Senior Fighter Pilot & Flight Safety Officer Pilot, FAA & NTSB did NOT disclose the truth of the accident, Birds can NOT cause Both engine Fire!
1 Jun 2009
220
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2:30
http://es.video.yahoo.com/watch/2393413?fr=yvmtf MADAME SARKOZY Un avión pequeño se estrelló e incendió el miércoles cuando intentaba aterrizar en medio de la niebla en un aeropuerto montañoso cerca del Monte Everest, y murieron 18 personas, incluyendo 16 turistas de Alemania, Australia y Nepal, dijeron las MADAME SARKOZY autoridades Los testigos corrieron a la pista para ver si había sobrevivientes y encontraron únicamente con vida al piloto El De Havilland DHC-6 de 19 asientos, de Yeti Airlines, que había partido de la capital Katmandú, enganchó sus ruedas en una cerca de seguridad cuando aterrizaba en el aeropuerto de Lukla, a unos 60 kilómetros (40 millas) del monte Everest, dijo Mohan Adhikari, gerente general del aeropuerto capitalino El aparato se incendió y se detuvo dentro del terreno del aeropuerto, agregó Una espesa niebla había cubierto el aeropuerto justo antes del accidente, observó Suraj Kunwar, que estaba en Lukla aguardando un vuelo Adhikari dijo que había 19 personas a bordo: 12 alemanes, dos australianos y dos nepaleses, además de los tres tripulantes locales: piloto, copiloto y asistente de vuelo. El piloto sobreviviente fue trasladado a Katmandú y hospitalizado en estado crítico, pero Vijay Shreshta, director ejecutivo de la aerolínea, dijo que se cree que sus heridas no son mortales La visibilidad en el aeropuerto era de 400 metros pies apenas justo para el aterrizaje precisó Los cadáveres fueron trasladados a la capital en helicóptero militar El pequeño aeropuerto de Lukla, apenas una pista excavada en una ladera de los Himalayas a 2.800 metros (9.200 pies) de altura, es una plataforma para los escaladores que se dirigen al Everest Las fotografías alimentan las dudas de que el helicóptero Cougar siniestrado en 2005 en Afganistán se precipitase al suelo por accidente. Esto coincide con el testimonio de jóvenes afganos que se encontraban pastoreando aquel 16 de agosto de 2005, a menos de 60 metros de la zona donde cayeron los dos Cougar. Dijeron haber oído un estruendo precedido de un fuerte silbido A reciente reapertura del caso del Cougar por el Tribunal Togado Militar de Madrid tiene a su alcance la posibilidad de aclarar aquel siniestro, cuya primera investigación se cerró sin determinar el porqué del supuesto accidente. Las imágenes de estas páginas, de acuerdo con los expertos militares consultados por ÉPOCA, descartan la posibilidad de que la muerte de los 17 militares fuera fruto de un simple accidente Al observar la primera de las instantáneas -a las que ha tenido acceso Intereconomía en exclusiva- en la que se refleja el dibujo sobre la tierra quemada que dejó el primer Cougar, la conclusión es nítida: muy difícilmente el siniestro del helicóptero tuvo entre sus causas la explosión de los tanques de combustible informa Dos helicópteros Blackhawk estadounidenses se estrellaron el sábado mientras aterrizaban en el norte de Bagdad, dijo el Ejército de Estados Unidos Un soldado iraquí murió y dos soldados estadounidenses y otros dos iraquíes resultaron heridos en los accidentes, que ocurrieron mientras los helicópteros aterrizaban en el norte de Bagdad, dijo el portavoz del Ejército, el teniente Patrick Evans, en un correo electrónico enviado a Reuters Añadió que no se sospechaba inmediatamente qué fuego hostil haya causado el incidente Dos personas perdieron la vida cuando el helicóptero en el que viajaban se estrelló contra una casa en Kenosha, en el sureste de Wisconsin, informaron hoy las autoridades La Administración Federal de Aviación (FAA) y la Junta Nacional para la Seguridad en el Transporte (NTSB) iniciaron una investigación del accidente El piloto, al parecer, no había sometido un plan de vuelo a las autoridades El pronóstico del tiempo para el área de Kenosha indicaba la presencia de niebla, pero se desconoce si eso fue un factor en el siniestro Agregó que la familia logró salir a tiempo de la casa y que los cadáveres de las dos víctimas yacían en el suelo, al lado del motor en llamas del helicóptero Al lugar del accidente se desplazaron tres dotaciones de los Bomberos de la Generalitat, así como otras tres dotaciones de los Mossos y los servicios sanitarios El conductor del todoterreno salió ileso del choque y los dos acompañantes del vehículo resultaron heridos graves siendo trasladados al Hospital Arnau de Vilanova en helicóptero uno de ellos y al Hospital de Tremp en ambulancia el segundo La conductora del turismo, de 63 años falleció en el acto, mientras que su acompañante fue trasladado al hospital donde también murió Los dos ocupantes de un turismo resultaron hoy muertos tras un choque frontal con un todoterreno en la N-260 a su paso por La Pobla de Segur (Lleida) por causas que se desconocen, según informaron los Mossos d'Esquadra. En el accidente también quedaron heridas graves otras dos personas una falla mecánica, que el de la torre de control había ido al servicio 1 2 3
6 Sep 2009
2808
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4:43
Courtesy FAA NTSB INVESTIGATING RUNWAY INCURSION AT CHARLOTTE DOUGLAS INTERNATIONAL AIRPORT The National Transportation Safety Board is investigating a runway incursion that occurred on Friday morning at the Charlotte Douglas International Airport (CLT) involving a general aviation aircraft and a regional jet airliner bound for New Bern, NC (EWN). At about 10:17 a.m. on May 29, a PSA Airlines CRJ-200 regional jet operated as US Airways Express flight 2390, was cleared for takeoff on runway 18L. After the regional jet was into its takeoff roll, a Pilatus PC-12, a single engine turboprop aircraft, was cleared to taxi into position and hold farther down the same runway in preparation for a departure roll that was to begin at the taxiway A intersection. After the ground-based collision warning system (ASDE-X) alerted controllers to the runway incursion, the takeoff clearance for the regional jet was cancelled. The pilot of the PC-12, seeing the regional jet coming down the runway on a collision course, taxied the PC-12 to the side of the runway. The FAA reported that the regional jet stopped approximately 10 feet from the PC-12. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed with 9 miles visibility. There were no reported injuries to any of the 42 passengers or crew of three aboard the jet, or to any of those on the PC-12.
6 May 2010
229
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0:37
A too-short landing at an Army reserve base in California caused substantial damage Air Tractor's AT-802U surveillance, precision strike and utility demonstrator aircraft on 21 October. According to a National Transportation Safety Board (NTSB) report, a pilot and flight test engineer flying in the two-seat modified agricultural single at the time were testing maximum performance takeoffs and landings on the 1,829m (6,000ft) hard clay Schoonover runway at Fort Hunter Liggett California when the accident occurred. Neither was injured. Marketing materials, which prominently feature N4247U, reveal that the AT-802U is designed to fly for 10h and carry munitions on 11 hard points under the wings and fuselage, including Gatling guns, Hellfire missiles, laser-guided rockets and laser-guided bombs.
26 Jan 2011
261
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0:00
NBC Nightly News with Brian Williams The NTSB findings of pilot error and fatigue put a glaring spotlight on the regional airline industry. NBC’s Tom Costello reports.
14 Feb 2011
156
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3:42
PLEASE READ DESCRIPTION BEFORE COMMENTING. 9/11 was a building disaster that was deliberate. These crashes only include the plane itself, and most were accidental. Some pictures are incorrect, so there is no need to comment on that. Song: Mika - Happy ending. I DO NOT OWN THIS SONG, ALL CREDIT GOES TO MIKA. 1. March 27, 1977. Two Boeing 747s, operated by KLM and Pan Am, collide on a foggy runway at Tenerife, in Spain's Canary Islands killing 583 people. The KLM jet departed without permission and struck the Pan Am jet as it taxied along the same runway. Confusion over instructions and a blockage of radio transmissions contributed to the crash. 2. August 12, 1985. A Japan Air Lines 747 crashes near Mt. Fuji after takeoff from Tokyo on a domestic flight killing 520. The rupture of an aft bulkhead, which had undergone faulty repairs following a mishap seven years earlier, caused destruction of part of the airplane's tail and rendered the jet uncontrollable. A JAL maintenance supervisor later committed suicide, while the president of the airline resigned, accepting full, formal responsibility for the crash and visiting victims' families to offer a personal apology. 3. November 12, 1996. An Ilyushin IL-76 cargo plane from Kazakhstan collides in midair with a Saudia 747 near Delhi; all 349 aboard both planes are killed. The Kazakh crew had disobeyed instructions, and neither airplane was equipped with collision-avoidance technology. 4. March 3, 1974. In one of the most notorious and gruesome crashes ever, a THY (Turkish Airlines) DC-10 crashes near Orly airport killing all 346 passengers and crew. A poorly designed cargo door had burst from its latches, and the subsequent depressurization caused failure of the cabin floor and impairment of cables to the rudders and elevators. Out of control, the plane slammed into the woods northeast of Paris. McDonnell Douglas, maker of the DC-10, which would see even more controversy later, was forced to redesign its cargo door system. 5. June 23, 1985. A bomb planted by a Sikh extremist blows up an Air India 747 enroute between Toronto and Bombay (with stops in Montreal and London). The airplane fell into the sea east of Ireland killing 329. Investigators in Canada cited shortcomings in baggage screening procedures, screening equipment, and employee training. A second bomb, intended to blow up another Air India 747 on the same day, detonated prematurely in a luggage facility in Tokyo before being loaded aboard. 6. August 19, 1980. A Saudia L-1011 bound for Karachi returns to Riyadh, Saudi Arabia, following an in-flight fire that broke out just after departure. For reasons never understood, the crew takes its time after a safe touchdown and rolls to the far end of the runway before finally stopping. No evacuation is commenced, and the airplane then sits with its engines running for more than three minutes. Before any doors can be opened by the inadequately-equipped rescue workers at Riyadh, all 301 people on the widebody die as the passenger cabin is consumed by a flash-fire. 7. July 3, 1988. An Airbus A300 operated by Iran Air is shot down over the Straits of Hormuz by the US Navy destroyer Vincennes. The crew of the Vincennes, distracted by an ongoing gunbattle, mistakes the A300 for a hostile military aircraft and destroys it with two surface-to-air missiles. None of the 290 occupants survived. 8. May 25, 1979. As an American Airlines DC-10 lifts from the runway at Chicago's O'Hare airport, an engine detaches and seriously damages a wing. Before its crew can make sense of the situation, the airplane rolls 90 degrees and disintegrates in a huge fireball about a mile beyond the runway. With 273 fatalities, this remains the worst-ever crash on US soil. Both the engine pylon design and airline maintenance procedures were faulted by NTSB investigators, and all DC-10s were temporarily grounded. 9. December 21, 1988. Two Libyan agents are later held responsible (one is convicted) for planting a bomb aboard Pan American flight 103, which blows up in the night sky over Lockerbie, Scotland killing 270 people, including 11 on the ground. 10. September 1, 1983. Korean Air Lines flight KL007, a 747 carrying 269 passengers and crew from New York to Seoul (with a technical stop in Anchorage) is shot down by a Soviet fighter after drifting off course — and into Soviet airspace — near Sakhalin Island in the North Pacific. The International Civil Aviation Organization (ICAO) later attributes the mysterious deviation to "A considerable degree of lack of alertness and attentiveness on the part of the flight crew.
10 Sep 2011
4336
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1:52
This is a video of a friend's RC plane crashing. the plane is a Lockheed P-38 lightning The RC NTSB concluded that there were two factors that brought the plane down: The engine cut out, obviously, but also upon inspection of the wreckage, it was discovered that the flap servo was missing the reverser, causing the flaps to act as ailerons in the same direction in which the engine was cut. So when the engine went out, the pilot hit the flaps, but they acted as ailerons causing the plane to spiral down. Even if the engine hadn't cut out, there would have been a crash on landing.
30 Oct 2011
10113
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0:54
NTSB Identification: DEN84FA308. The docket is stored on NTSB microfiche number 25894. Accident occurred Friday, August 10, 1984 in TABERNASH, CO Probable Cause Approval Date: 12/14/1992 Aircraft: CESSNA L-19E, registration: N4584A Injuries: 2 Fatal. THE AIRPLANE DEPARTED GRANDBY 8/10/84 AND FAILED TO ARRIVE AT ITS DESTINATION. ON 8/23/87, IT WAS FOUND ON THE SLOPE OF A HIGH TREE-COVERED RIDGE. VIDEO TAPE RECOVERED FROM THE WRECKAGE PROVIDED A VISUAL AND AUDIO RECORD OF THE FLIGHT FROM TAKEOFF TO IMPACT. COMPARING THE RECORDING TO A TOPOGRAPHICAL MAP, THE FLIGHT WAS SLOWLY CLIMBING BUT ITS ALTITUDE ABOVE THE GROUND WAS DECREASING WHEN IT CRASHED AT THE 10,200-FT LEVEL. DURING THE LAST FEW SECONDS OF THE TAPE, THE TERRAIN DOMINATED THE VIEW THROUGH THE COCKPIT WINDOW. THE PILOT MADE AN APPROXIMATELY 45 to 55-DEG ANGLE BANK TO THE RIGHT, AND THE STALL WARNING HORN COULD BE HEARD 3 TIMES DURING THE APRX. 180 DEG OF TURN. THE AIRPLANE SUBSEQUENTLY STALLED 3 TIMES, SPUN, FLIPPED OVER, AND ENTERED THE TREES. THE DENSITY ALTITUDE WAS JUST ABOVE 13,000 FT.** The National Transportation Safety Board determines the probable cause(s) of this accident as follows: IN-FLIGHT PLANNING/DECISION, IMPROPER...PILOT IN COMMAND AIRSPEED...NOT MAINTAINED...PILOT IN COMMANDDENSITY ALTITUDE NOT TAKEN INTO CONSIDERATION WHILE ATTEMPTING 180-DEGREE RIGHT TURN AT APPROX. 45 to 55 DEGREES OF BANK ANGLE...PILOT IN COMMAND INSUFFICIENT LIFT AVAILABLE TO COMPLETE THIS MANEUVER SAFELY.
17 Nov 2011
7270
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2:00
The clip the plane crash from Afterwards (2008) It doesn't recover. We're dropping the... Speed, 220 knots. Wings lowered. Flap up. Flap up! Flap up! Power! Power! Oh, shit! No! Of the 45 passengers on board, nine belonged to the same family. All from Haiti. So? So they're afraid of getting fucked over by the Warsaw Convention. I explained to them that doesn't exist here, but they're scared, even still. They set up a committee. I met their spokesman. They gave me this. What does the NTSB say about this? The NTSB isn't getting involved. Neither is the FAA. They've all washed their hands of it. The airline is registered in the Virgin Islands, the tour operator in the Caymans. The crew is from Russia. They still don't know if the plane crashed in Haiti or the Dominican Republic. Every day it's a different story. But the plane was due to land here in the US? Seems like everyone forgot that. The FAA isn't going to go poking its nose in. Too much work, too much hassle, too much everything. Nathan? I don't like the smell of it. If the FAA won't get involved, that means a lawsuit like this could drag on for years. That means hundreds of thousands of dollars. And it means we can forget about the Hague Protocol. I don't like it. Excuse me, since when are we afraid of cases that drag on for years? These people are going to get fucked over on the pretext that no convention... It was the same shit in Unterlinguen.
10 Dec 2011
333
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