Results for: obesity Search Results
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3:42
Dear friends in this video we are going to discuss about herbal weight loss supplements to fight obesity naturally
9 Apr 2017
20
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3:36
Dear friends in this video we are going to discuss about natural treatment for obesity to lose weight safely and quickly
10 Apr 2017
11
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21:48
Balanced Health Today Call Now 1(888)277-4980 Fatty liver disease occurs when the liver has trouble breaking down fats, causing fat to build up in the liver tissue. Some root causes of this disease include: Medications Viral hepatitis Autoimmune or inherited liver disease Fast weight loss Malnutrition There are a number of risk factors that increase your chances of having NAFLD; they include: Obesity Gastric bypass surgery High cholesterol High levels of triglycerides in the blood Type 2 diabetes Metabolic syndrome Sleep apnea Polycystic ovary syndrome Underactive thyroid (hypothyroidism) Underactive pituitary gland (hypopituitarism) According to a study conducted at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis, obesity is associated with an increased risk of nonalcoholic fatty liver disease. A major feature of NAFLD, called steatosis, occurs when the rate of hepatic fatty acid uptake from plasma and fatty acid synthesis is greater than the rate of fatty acid oxidation and export. This metabolic imbalance is a significant factor responsible for the formation of NAFLD. A 2006 review published in the Journal of Clinical Gastroenterology states that NAFLD is extremely common among patients undergoing bariatric surgery, ranging from 84 percent to 96 percent. The review also noted that the disease seems to be most common among men, and it increases with older age and after menopause in women.
28 Mar 2017
205
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7:02
Venus Factor Xtreme review There is an increasing number of obese individuals throughout the world, and this also causes a high percentage of medical conditions linked with weight problems including cardiovascular disease, diabetes, and other similar problems with health. In addition, being overweight decreases one’s confidence level. After all, won’t you rather have a slimmer and more toned body to feel amazing in your outfits? Thus, it is not surprising that there are now more products aiming to help people lose weight and achieve the body they desire. Venus Factor Overview The Venus Factor is a fitness program that focuses on the importance of following a special nutrition plan to boost a woman’s metabolic system. As a result, you will be able to lose weight faster and continue doing so even after your workouts. The secret is all into the metabolic rate, which must be enhanced to prevent the body from storing excess calories. Hence, the food you eat is broken down efficiently and the energy from it is used for energy supply. Who Is It For? This program is ideal for women who are wanting to lose weight naturally. There are diet and exercise guides introduced in the Venus Factor, which all contribute to the fulfillment of these purposes. Whether you are an adult or elderly, you will find this program effective in providing your needs of having a slimmer and healthier body. However, it is important to consult your doctor first before starting with any new diet plan to ensure your safety, as well as the effectiveness of the program. Pros and Cons of the Venus Factor So, what exactly are the benefits and limitations of the Venus Factor Xtreme? Below are the pros and cons of this product to help you make up your mind whether or not it is worth your precious dollar. 1. No Restrictions on Food The most exciting thing about the Venus Factor is the absence of strict dieting, which is a complete waste of time for those who are looking to slim down. In fact, this program
11 Apr 2017
37
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41:09
Balanced Health Today Call Now 1(888)277-4980 Certain risk factors may predispose a person to prostate cancer. These include: Age: Sixty percent of cases of prostate cancer arise in men over 65 years of age. The disease is rare in men under 40. Race or ethnicity: African-American men and Jamaican men of African ancestry are diagnosed with prostate cancer more often than are men of other races and ethnicities. Asian and Hispanic men are less likely to develop prostate cancer than are non-Hispanic white males. Family history: Prostate cancer can run in families. A man whose father or brother has or had prostate cancer is twice as likely to develop the disease. If several family members have had prostate cancer, and particularly if it was found at a young age in those relatives, the risk may be even higher. Nationality: Prostate cancer is more common in North America, Europe especially northwestern countries in Europe, the Caribbean, and Australia. It is less common in Asia, Africa, and South and Central America. Multiple factors, such as diet and lifestyle, may account for this. Genetic factors: Mutations in a portion of the DNA called the BRCA2 gene can increase a man's risk of getting prostate cancer, as well as other cancers. This same mutation in female family members may increase their risk of developing breast or ovarian cancer. However, very few cases of prostate cancer can be directly attributed to presently identifiable genetic changes. Other inherited genes associated with an increased risk of prostate cancer include: RNASEL, BRCA 2, DNA mismatch genes, and HoxB13. Other factors: Diets high in red meats and fatty foods and low in fruits and vegetables appear to be associated with a higher risk of developing prostate cancer. Obesity is also linked to a higher risk of the disease. Smoking, a history of sexually transmitted diseases, a history of prostatitis (inflammation of the prostate), and a history of vasectomy have NOT been proven to play a role
23 Apr 2017
4
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4:04
Dr Sudesh Kumar looks at the relationship between obesity and diabetes and how researchers are helping doctors better diagnose and treat both conditions.
5 Dec 2006
2464
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0:15
November 2006 (Medialink) -- Despite the confusion over juice, new research has found that it's not 100 percent fruit juice that makes children overweight. As a result of two new studies published in the journal Pediatrics, parents can now feel confident about serving their children appropriate amounts of 100 percent fruit juice. Both of these studies confirm that there is no connection between children's weight and consuming reasonable amounts of fruit juice. One of the studies from the Baylor College of Medicine evaluated data accumulated over several years from a national sample of preschoolers. The researchers determined that consumption of 100 percent juices is not associated with body mass index (BMI) among preschoolers. The analysis was based on the largest, on-going government database on food consumption (NHANES - National Health and Nutritional Examination Survey). The findings of another recent study also published in Pediatrics found there was no connection between juice consumption and body weight among normal weight children and among overweight children who consumed moderate amounts of juice. The American Academy of Pediatrics guidelines allow for 1/2 cup juice for children 1 to 5 years old and 1-1/2 cups juice for older children. When it comes to childhood obesity, researchers agree that more studies are needed on many diet and lifestyle factors, not just beverages. Produced for the Juice Products Association
9 Jan 2007
1256
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2:43
Shockingly obese people in musical montage.
30 Jan 2007
96601
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1:31
Wow! When we say our dogs look like their owners they really aren't kidding. With obesity on the rise in the human population it is very worrying that man's best friend is being over-fed and under-exercised out of love! Let's change this! Visit www.yourhealthydogs****
3 May 2007
6103
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0:22
Father and son surgeon team tackle obesity in TLC's new series BIG MEDICINE. The 13-part series chronicles the personal stories of severely obese patients who turn to the Houston Methodist Weight Management Center as a life-changing last resort. One of the most innovative bariatric surgery practices, Methodist adheres to a long-term, multidisciplinary approach that includes a plan for lifelong follow-up. At the heart of the operation is passionate father and son surgeon team Dr. Robert and Garth Davis, a pair who have dedicated their professional lives to raising awareness about obesity. Each episode chronicles the emotional journeys and transformation of obese people who undergo weight-loss surgery in an attempt to regain their lives. Patients are captured at various stages in the process – before and during the surgery, through recovery and post-op care and often through cosmetic procedures designed to remove sagging skin after dramatic weight loss. BIG MEDICINE premieres Mondays at 9PM (e/p) on TLC. Visit TLC**** for more information.
22 May 2007
35226
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0:55
Dr. Benzinger from secondopinion**** with health information on childhood obesity.
24 Jul 2007
661
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1:04
Dr. Benzinger from secondopinion**** with health information on Dieting for Obese Children
24 Jul 2007
959
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1:24
Dr. Benzinger from secondopinion**** with health information on obesity and too little sleep.
24 Jul 2007
411
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1:15
He may be obese, but that doesnt stop him from being evil! he also loves to dance.
30 Jul 2007
756
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1:33
*******www.SexyFatLoss**** There is no hard and fast answer to how much a person should weigh in order to be healthy. But, women need to be concerned about weight because it can and does affect overall health. Obesity, or being overweight, can result in premature death and can contribute to many problems, such as heart disease, high blood pressure, high blood cholesterol, diabetes, cancer, breathing problems, arthritis, and problems with pregnancy, labor and delivery. The first, and best, thing to do is to talk with your health care provider about your weight. Together, you can talk about what a healthy weight is for you, based on your height, build (bone size, amount of muscle) and age. You can also use a tool called the Body Mass Index (BMI) to give you a pound range for a healthy weight. You take your weight and height and see where you fall on the BMI table for adults (see below). There is also a handy BMI calculator at the National Heart, Lung and Blood Institute's web site (see resources at the end of this FAQ). Some general guidelines for losing weight safely are: • Eat fewer calories. The best formula for losing weight is to decrease the number of calories you get while increasing your physical activity every day. Depending on how active you are, you may need between 1,500 — 2,500 calories a day. A safe plan is to eat 300 to 500 fewer calories a day to lose 1 to 2 pounds a week. • Lose weight slowly. It is best to aim for losing 1/2 to 2 pounds a week. By improving eating and exercise habits, you will develop a healthier lifestyle. And, this will help you to control your weight over time. You will also lower your chances of getting heart disease, high blood pressure and diabetes. 'Crash' diets may take off pounds faster, but can cause you to gain back even more pounds than you lost after you stop the diet. • Exercise. Get active for at least 30 minutes every day. You don't have to train for a marathon to be active! Brisk walking, gardening, riding a bicycle, tennis and dancing all count as exercise. You can also break up the 30 minutes into three 10-minute periods. To get even more active every day, you can do things like park farther away from the mall in the parking lot and take the stairs instead of the elevator. The idea is to use up more calories than you eat each day. This will keep the calories from being stored as fat in your body. • Eat less fat and sugar. This will help lower the number of calories you eat each day. Select foods whose labels say low, light or reduced to describe calories or fat, including milk products and cheese. Eat lean types of meat, poultry, and fish. Eat less sugar and fewer sweets (don't forget that soda and juice can have lots of sugar). Drink less or no alcohol. • Eat a wide variety of foods, including starches and dairy products. This helps your body to get the nutrients and vitamins it needs to be healthy. Include plenty of vegetables, fruits, grain products and whole grains each day. Don't skip dairy products — there are many good tasting low, no, and reduced fat milks, yogurts, cheeses, ice creams, and other products to choose from. Proper calcium intake is needed for all women to prevent bone loss. Starch is an important source of energy that all bodies need, even when a person is trying to lose weight. It is found in foods like potatoes, rice, pasta, bread, beans, and some vegetables. Foods high in starch can become high in fat and calories when you eat them in large amounts, or when they are made with rich sauces, oils, or other high-fat toppings like butter, sour cream, or mayonnaise. Stick to starchy foods that are high in fiber, like whole grains, beans, and peas. • Practice portion control. Eat smaller amounts of food at each meal. Let go of belonging to the 'clean plate club.' Don't feel like you have to eat everything on your plate, even when eating out. You can also try eating more small meals throughout the day, rather than three large meals. • Get support. It can be hard to start a weight loss program, particularly if you are out of shape and not used to exercising. Ask your family and friends for support. Try to find an exercise buddy. Make your activity fun and social — go on a walk or hike with a friend or learn a new sport like tennis or ice-skating. • Treat yourself (once in a while). When trying to lose weight, we all feel tempted to 'cheat' by eating a favorite, rich food like cake or cookies. But, sometimes it can be helpful to eat a small amount of a favorite food. This may keep you from craving it and overeating if you do 'cheat.'
20 Oct 2007
2070
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1:16
*******www.SexyFatLoss**** There is no hard and fast answer to how much a person should weigh in order to be healthy. But, women need to be concerned about weight because it can and does affect overall health. Obesity, or being overweight, can result in premature death and can contribute to many problems, such as heart disease, high blood pressure, high blood cholesterol, diabetes, cancer, breathing problems, arthritis, and problems with pregnancy, labor and delivery. The first, and best, thing to do is to talk with your health care provider about your weight. Together, you can talk about what a healthy weight is for you, based on your height, build (bone size, amount of muscle) and age. You can also use a tool called the Body Mass Index (BMI) to give you a pound range for a healthy weight. You take your weight and height and see where you fall on the BMI table for adults (see below). There is also a handy BMI calculator at the National Heart, Lung and Blood Institute's web site (see resources at the end of this FAQ). Some general guidelines for losing weight safely are: • Eat fewer calories. The best formula for losing weight is to decrease the number of calories you get while increasing your physical activity every day. Depending on how active you are, you may need between 1,500 — 2,500 calories a day. A safe plan is to eat 300 to 500 fewer calories a day to lose 1 to 2 pounds a week. • Lose weight slowly. It is best to aim for losing 1/2 to 2 pounds a week. By improving eating and exercise habits, you will develop a healthier lifestyle. And, this will help you to control your weight over time. You will also lower your chances of getting heart disease, high blood pressure and diabetes. 'Crash' diets may take off pounds faster, but can cause you to gain back even more pounds than you lost after you stop the diet. • Exercise. Get active for at least 30 minutes every day. You don't have to train for a marathon to be active! Brisk walking, gardening, riding a bicycle, tennis and dancing all count as exercise. You can also break up the 30 minutes into three 10-minute periods. To get even more active every day, you can do things like park farther away from the mall in the parking lot and take the stairs instead of the elevator. The idea is to use up more calories than you eat each day. This will keep the calories from being stored as fat in your body. • Eat less fat and sugar. This will help lower the number of calories you eat each day. Select foods whose labels say low, light or reduced to describe calories or fat, including milk products and cheese. Eat lean types of meat, poultry, and fish. Eat less sugar and fewer sweets (don't forget that soda and juice can have lots of sugar). Drink less or no alcohol. • Eat a wide variety of foods, including starches and dairy products. This helps your body to get the nutrients and vitamins it needs to be healthy. Include plenty of vegetables, fruits, grain products and whole grains each day. Don't skip dairy products — there are many good tasting low, no, and reduced fat milks, yogurts, cheeses, ice creams, and other products to choose from. Proper calcium intake is needed for all women to prevent bone loss. Starch is an important source of energy that all bodies need, even when a person is trying to lose weight. It is found in foods like potatoes, rice, pasta, bread, beans, and some vegetables. Foods high in starch can become high in fat and calories when you eat them in large amounts, or when they are made with rich sauces, oils, or other high-fat toppings like butter, sour cream, or mayonnaise. Stick to starchy foods that are high in fiber, like whole grains, beans, and peas. • Practice portion control. Eat smaller amounts of food at each meal. Let go of belonging to the 'clean plate club.' Don't feel like you have to eat everything on your plate, even when eating out. You can also try eating more small meals throughout the day, rather than three large meals. • Get support. It can be hard to start a weight loss program, particularly if you are out of shape and not used to exercising. Ask your family and friends for support. Try to find an exercise buddy. Make your activity fun and social — go on a walk or hike with a friend or learn a new sport like tennis or ice-skating. • Treat yourself (once in a while). When trying to lose weight, we all feel tempted to 'cheat' by eating a favorite, rich food like cake or cookies. But, sometimes it can be helpful to eat a small amount of a favorite food. This may keep you from craving it and overeating if you do 'cheat.'
27 Oct 2007
548
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