Results for: octopus Search Results
Family Filter:
0:18
Two species of tropical octopus have evolved a neat trick to avoid predators - they lift up six of their arms and walk backward on the other two. The Indonesian coconut octopus, Octopus marginatus, scoots along the ocean floor using the tips of its arms. (Video by Bob Cranston/Sea Studios, Inc.; Rights protected clip. Not to be copied.) More video: The octopus Octopus aculeatus maintains its algae-like camouflage while walking backwards on two arms, using the outer part of each arm like a conveyor belt. (Video by Crissy Huffard/UC Berkeley) 1.2Mb QuickTime file This first report of bipedal behavior in octopuses, written by University of California, Berkeley, researchers, will be published in the March 25 issue of Science. When walking, these octopuses use the outer halves of their two back arms like tank treads, alternately laying down a sucker edge and rolling it along the ground. In Indonesia, for example, the coconut octopus looks like a coconut tiptoeing along the ocean bottom, six of its arms wrapped tightly around its body. UC Berkeley graduate student Crissy Huffard clocked the two-legged speed of one coconut octopus at two and a half inches per second, while a second individual zoomed along, backwards, at five and a half inches per second. This is faster than they can crawl, but probably slower than they jet around. The other type of octopus, which camouflages itself as algae in tropical waters from Indonesia to Australia, looks like a sea monster scooting along the sea floor on two legs. Huffard filmed this creature off Australia's Great Barrier Reef easily rolling over rocks and other obstacles. "This behavior is very exciting," said Huffard, who first noted it five years ago in the coconut octopus but only recently was able to capture both types of octopuses on film. "This is the first underwater bipedal locomotion I know of, and the first example of hydrostatic bipedal movement." Huffard and coauthor Robert Full, professor of integrative biology at UC Berkeley, think that this bipedal walking is a strategy octopuses use to backpedal away from predators while remaining camouflaged. Octopuses camouflage themselves by changing both color and shape, but when startled and forced to move quickly, they have to give up their camouflage. Not so when walking. "This bipedal behavior allows them to get away and remain cryptic," said Huffard. An octopus is basically a water-filled balloon, but with the fluid contained in muscle cells rather than an open cavity. It keeps its shape not with an internal or external skeleton but by hydrostatic pressure, sometimes called a hydrostatic skeleton or muscular hydrostat. Normally, it crawls over the bottom of the ocean, pushing and pulling with the suckers on its eight arms, or jets backwards through the water. All these movements are accomplished through muscles that squeeze and bend the fluid-filled arms and body. Full said he was "blown away" when Huffard showed him video of the octopuses last year. He urged her to obtain more video that could be used to more clearly see how they walk, and encouraged her to publish the observations. Full, who looks at many types of animal locomotion and seeks to determine how animals control such movements, sees a revolutionary new principle in how the octopus uses its arms - one that could be used in making soft, squishy robots. "Understanding behavior like this could usher in a new frontier of 'soft' robotics," in contrast to the rigid robots common today, he said. "New artificial muscles that can stiffen at will could reproduce this walking behavior," said Full. "The wonderful thing about soft robotics is that it's infinitely adaptable, unlike the few degrees of freedom of rigid robots." Huffard first noticed the coconut octopus, Octopus marginatus, dancing along the sand in 2000, while helping a film crew obtain octopus footage off the island of Sulawesi in Indonesia. The octopus, with a head about two inches long, lives on the sandy bottom in water some 20 to 30 meters (60 to 100 feet) deep, among lots of sunken coconuts, and even hides out in the shells of coconuts, drawing two halves around it to hide. Its weird walking behavior, no doubt noticed by numerous other divers, has apparently never been analyzed in the scientific literature, she said. "We know so little about these animals," Huffard said, noting that only 200 of perhaps 300 species of octopus from around the world have been described. She herself is writing up descriptions of five new octopuses, one from Hawaii and four from Tonga. She filed away her observations about O. marginatus, however, to concentrate on her thesis, which involves the behavior of another Indonesian octopus, Octopus (Abdopus) aculeatus. This creature with a head the size of a walnut inhabits the intertidal zone, foraging along sandy bottoms among grasses and hiding out in tidepools or burying itself in the sand at low tide. To camouflage itself, it sometimes coils its two front arms and raises them in a pose that somewhat resembles algae. Two years ago, while Huffard was visiting her thesis advisor, UC Berkeley integrative biology professor Roy Caldwell, on Lizard Island 45 miles north of Cairns, Australia, she decided to take a look at local members of that same species. She snorkeled out to capture one and, after putting it in a tank at the research station, was surprised to see it also walking on two arms. "It seemed like it was walking on little conveyor belts," she said. She suspects that the reason she never saw this behavior in O. aculeatus in Indonesia, despite some thousand hours of snorkeling over five years, is that in Indonesia, the currents are often too strong for such behavior. Both Huffard and Full are interested in how these octopuses control their unusual form of bipedal locomotion. Recent articles shed light on this. Israeli scientists have reported that octopus arms execute incredibly complex curling and bending motions even when cut off. Apparently a nerve ganglion in each arm can send clock-like signals down the arm to produce rhythmic movements, such as bends propagating down the arm, irrespective of whether there is a head and brain to control them. Similar movements seem to be involved in two-legged walking. "These are stereotyped movements that don't need feedback from the brain," Huffard said. "A lot of behavior is built into the ganglia of each octopus arm, so that seemingly complex behavior is really simple," Full added. Similar controls could make a soft robotic arm a lot easier to control than it would seem, and make it feasible to build an octopus robot that walks. An article in the Feb. 11, 2005, issue of Nature revealed just such a mechanism. Huffard's research was supported by an American Malacological Society Student Research Grant. Full is supported by the National Science Foundation. A third co-author on the paper is Farnis Boneka of the Department of Fisheries and Marine Science, Universitas Sam Ratulangi, Manado, North Sulawesi, Indonesia.
8 Nov 2008
18825
Share Video

0:18
Very smart Octopus..
7 Nov 2008
151996
Share Video

3:58
Yes, octopi have beaks. Well, at least the best ones do...the ones Chef John DeLucie uses for his Mediterranean masterpiece. Octopus doesn't have to be as exclusive as The Waverly Inn although it can be just as good when it comes from Mylo Gourmet. He removes the center and magically, a properly charred octopus takes the shape of a starfish. Who wouldn't be hooked? With olives the size of plums and a side of Chef DeLucie, octopus could easily become the new chicken. For the recipe, q&a with the chef, special promotion to buy related products at off retail prices and much more visit www.behindtheburner****.
25 Nov 2008
590
Share Video

1:08
Visit for more Boats & Yachts Videos and Reviews.... Octopus Derecktor Yachts Devonport Yachts Fairline Yachts Ferretti Yachts hakvoort Yachts Hargrave Yachts Hatteras Yachts Heesen Yachts Horizon Yachts ISA Yachts Johnson Yachts Kingship Yachts Lazzara Yachts Lurssen Yachts Maiora Yachts Marlow Yachts Marquis Yachts Leopard Yachts Millennium YachtsMochi Craft Yachts Mangusta Yachts Moloka Yachts Moonen Yachts Mulder Yachts Nordhavn Yachts Northcoast yachts Northern Marine Yachts Oceanco Yachts Offshore Yachts Pacific Mariner Yachts Palmer Johnson Yachts Perini Navi Yachts Pershing Yachts Post Yachts Queenship Yachts Rayburn Yachts Richmond Yahts Riva Yachts Royal Denship Yachts Royal Huisman Yachts Rybovich Yachts San Lorenzo Yachts Sea Ray Yachts Shadow Marine Yachts Silverton Yachts Sunseeker Yachts Trinity Yachts Viking Yachts Vicem Yachts Wally Yachts Warren Yachts Westbay Sonship Yachts Westport Yachts Yacht Escort Ships benetti yacht yachts luxury superyacht 50mt Yachts Leopard 46m, 34m, 32m for sale Yachts Classic yachts megayacht charter titanic style luxury steam ship jet ski. impala 31 x-yacht sailing world yachtbrokers zeiljacht for sale te koop jachtmakelaar snelle zeiler Boats Boat Cabin Cruiser Mike Dawes Portland Yacht Sales Yachts For Sale Oregon Bayliner Ciera Sun Bridge Regal Sport Cruiser Boats Boattest Review performance Tests Reviews boaters Beneteau monte carlo 37 MBM boat boats motorboat motorboats monthly Just reduced $7,500 for immediate quick sale!!!! One of Carver's most popular models, the 350 Mariner has beautiful exterior styling. The 350's cabin design is a shining example of what has made Carver famous in the luxury accommodations field. The single-level cabin offers a party-size salon and available sleeping accommodations for six. Two integral fiberglass stairways lead to the bridge with its seating for eleven, port and starboard lounges, and aft four-wide bench seat, plus a control console with full instrumentation and full wrap-around windshield. A sliding door leads directly from the cabin to the roomy cockpit. The integrated transom platform includes a stowaway ladder. She only has 570 hours on the motors, which are 5.7 liter Mercruiser Inboards. There is a Kohler 5.0 KW Generator, heat, a two burner propane stove and oven, and microwave. An electric head, power windlass, and a excellent entertainment center. The canvas is like new in excellent condition. One fine freshwater CARVER!!! Riviera boat boats yachts marine Maritimo luxury 3600 Sport Yacht Riviera boat boats yachts marine Maritimo luxury 3600 Sport
18 Dec 2008
262
Share Video

2:25
2 octopus and a great Love :):)
6 Jan 2009
4146
Share Video

1:29
octopus attacks shark
3 Feb 2009
3110
Share Video

3:15
Giant Pacific Octopus
22 Feb 2009
21460
Share Video

1:05
The Giant Pacific Octopus is smarter than you might think. And at the Smithsonian's National Zoo, Jorge Ribas watches one use its wits - and many arms - to get a snack.aquatic wildlife octopus octopi cephalopod scary cool zoo logic weird und
22 Mar 2009
2161
Share Video

1:30
Scientists have found octopus fossils that they claim are 95 million years old. The fossils are well preserved and display tentacles, suckers, and a trace of ink. To get the whole commentary, watch Learn2Discern! Distributed by Tubemogul.
23 Apr 2009
114
Share Video

0:38
Octopuses of the Seven Seas. An octopus has eight arms, which trail behind it as it swims. Most octopuses have no internal or external skeleton, allowing them to squeeze through tight places. An octopus has a hard beak, with its mouth at the center point of the arms. Octopuses are highly intelligent, probably the most intelligent invertebrates. For defense against predators, they hide, flee quickly, expel ink, or use color-changing camouflage.
28 Apr 2009
240
Share Video

2:15
HUGE thanks to The Asylum for sending this to me. Check out their site *******theasylum.cc they got some cool stuff.Be sure to check back for a review of Mega Shark vs Giant Octopus.
14 May 2009
927
Share Video

2:45
Shark Vs. Octopus
3 Aug 2009
1225
Share Video