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Balanced Health Today Call Now 1(888)277-4980 What is the lymphatic system? It’s a critical part of the immune system, vital for protecting us from illness and damaging, disease-causing inflammation. Essentially, the lymphatic system is the the body’s inner “drainage system,” a network of blood vessels and lymph nodes that carry fluids from tissues around the body into the blood and vice versa. The lymphatic system has the primary role of protecting the body against outside threats such as infections, bacteria and cancer cells while helping keep fluid levels in balance. The best way to protect the complex series of criss-crossing lymphatic vessels and “nodes” that span almost the entire body (every one except for the central nervous system) is to eat a healing diet, exercise and take steps to detoxify the body naturally. Lymphatic vessels carry fluid that is managed through “valves,” which stop fluid from traveling the wrong way, similar to how blood flow works within the arteries and veins. In fact, the lymphatic system is very similar to the circulatory system made up of branches of veins, arteries and capillaries both bring essential fluids around the whole body and are vital for keeping us alive. In comparison to veins, lymph vessels are much smaller, and instead of bringing blood throughout the body, the lymphatic system carries a liquid called lymph, which stores our while blood cells. (1) Lymph is a clear, watery fluid and also carries protein molecules, salts, glucose and other substances, along with bacteria, throughout the body.
28 Mar 2017
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21:48
Balanced Health Today Call Now 1(888)277-4980 Gallbladder pain is (often misspelled "gall bladder") an all-inclusive term used to describe any pain due to disease related to the gallbladder. The major gallbladder problems that produce gallbladder pain are biliary colic, cholecystitis, gallstones, pancreatitis, and ascending cholangitis. Symptoms vary and may be triggered by eating certain foods. The pain may be described as intermittent, constant, abdominal, radiating to the back, mild to severe depending on the underlying cause. A brief review of the gallbladder anatomy and function may help readers better understand gallbladder pain. The gallbladder is connected to the liver via ducts that supply bile to the gallbladder for storage. These bile ducts then form the common hepatic duct that joins with the cystic duct from the gallbladder to form the common bile duct that empties into the GI tract (duodenum). In addition, the pancreatic duct usually merges with the common bile duct just before it enters the duodenum. Hormones trigger the gallbladder to release bile when fat and amino acids reach the duodenum after eating a meal, which facilitates the digestion of these foods. Statistics suggest that women may have up to twice the incidence of gallstones than men. As stated previously, the major gallbladder problems that produce gallbladder pain are biliary colic, cholecystitis, gallstones, pancreatitis, and ascending cholangitis. There are two major causes of pain that either originate from the gallbladder or involve the gallbladder directly. They are due to 1) intermittent or complete blockage of any of the ducts by gallstones; or 2) gallstone sludge and/or inflammation that may accompany irritation or infection of the surrounding tissues, when partial or complete obstruction of ducts causes pressure and ischemia (inadequate blood supply due to a blockage of blood vessels in the area) to develop in the adjacent tissues.
3 Apr 2017
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0:53
Harmony Thai Massage Houston offer a unique combination of various massage techniques such as Swedish, Deep Tissue, Thai and so on with energy work. One of the primary goals of the Swedish massage technique is to relax the entire body. This is accomplished by rubbing the muscles with long gliding strokes in the direction of blood returning to the heart. But Swedish massage therapy goes beyond relaxation. Swedish massage in Houston is exceptionally beneficial for increasing the level of oxygen in the blood, decreasing muscle toxins, improving circulation and flexibility while easing tension. Address 12645 Memorial Drive, Suite F-3, Houston, TX 77024 Phone 713 465 6700
8 Apr 2017
10
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21:48
Balanced Health Today Call Now 1(888)277-4980 Liver disease is any disturbance of liver function that causes illness. The liver is responsible for many critical functions within the body and should it become diseased or injured, the loss of those functions can cause significant damage to the body. Liver disease is also referred to as hepatic disease. Liver disease is a broad term that covers all the potential problems that cause the liver to fail to perform its designated functions. Usually, more than 75% or three quarters of liver tissue needs to be affected before a decrease in function occurs. The liver is the largest solid organ in the body; and is also considered a gland because among its many functions, it makes and secretes bile. The liver is located in the upper right portion of the abdomen protected by the rib cage. It has two main lobes that are made up of tiny lobules. The liver cells have two different sources of blood supply. The hepatic artery supplies oxygen rich blood that is pumped from the heart, while the portal vein supplies nutrients from the intestine and the spleen. Normally, veins return blood from the body to the heart, but the portal vein allows nutrients and chemicals from the digestive tract to enter the liver for processing and filtering prior to entering the general circulation. The portal vein also efficiently delivers the chemicals and proteins that liver cells need to produce the proteins, cholesterol, and glycogen required for normal body activities. As part of its function, the liver makes bile, a fluid that contains among other substances, water, chemicals, and bile acids (made from stored cholesterol in the liver). Bile is stored in the gallbladder and when food enters the duodenum (the first part of the small intestine), bile is secreted into the duodenum, to aid in the digestion of food. The liver is the only organ in the body that can easily replace damaged cells, but if enough cells are lost, the liver may not
9 Apr 2017
23
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21:48
Balanced Health Today Call Now 1(888)277-4980 What are the kidneys and what do they do? The kidneys are two bean-shaped organs, each about the size of a fist. They are located just below the rib cage, one on each side of the spine. Every day, the two kidneys filter about 120 to 150 quarts of blood to produce about 1 to 2 quarts of urine, composed of wastes and extra fluid. The urine flows from the kidneys to the bladder through two thin tubes of muscle called ureters, one on each side of the bladder. The bladder stores urine. The muscles of the bladder wall remain relaxed while the bladder fills with urine. As the bladder fills to capacity, signals sent to the brain tell a person to find a toilet soon. When the bladder empties, urine flows out of the body through a tube called the urethra, located at the bottom of the bladder. In men the urethra is long, while in women it is short. Why are the kidneys important? The kidneys are important because they keep the composition, or makeup, of the blood stable, which lets the body function. They prevent the buildup of wastes and extra fluid in the body keep levels of electrolytes stable, such as sodium, potassium, and phosphate make hormones that help regulate blood pressure make red blood cells bones stay strong How do the kidneys work? The kidney is not one large filter. Each kidney is made up of about a million filtering units called nephrons. Each nephron filters a small amount of blood. The nephron includes a filter, called the glomerulus, and a tubule. The nephrons work through a two-step process. The glomerulus lets fluid and waste products pass through it; however, it prevents blood cells and large molecules, mostly proteins, from passing. The filtered fluid then passes through the tubule, which sends needed minerals back to the bloodstream and removes wastes. The final product becomes urine.
15 Apr 2017
15
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15:44
Balanced Health Today Call Now 1(888)277-4980 Nausea is the first sign of radiation sickness after cancer treatment. Medication can help to reduce this. Nausea may cease and then return after a few days. If nausea and vomiting occur within 24 hours of treatment, the patient should contact their physician. Headaches, weakness, and fatigue often occur with mild radiation sickness, and they may continue for some time after the therapy is finished. High doses of radiation therapy for cancer can lead to high fever, hair loss, bloody stools, or diarrhea. Patients who experience these symptoms in the first few days after treatment should consult their physician to see if this is normal for the dose received. Longer term exposure to radiation, at lower doses that do not normally incur serious radiation sickness, can induce cancer, because they can cause genetic mutations. Diagnosing radiation sickness To diagnose radiation sickness, blood tests may be carried out over several days. The results can reveal if there is a reduction in white blood cells. White blood cells fight disease. Blood tests can also detect any abnormal changes in the DNA of blood cells. These factors indicate the degree of bone marrow damage. Normally, the higher the dose, the greater the effect on white blood cells and bone marrow. A device called a dosimeter can measure the absorbed dose of radiation, and a Geiger counter can determine where a person has radioactive particles in their body.
16 Apr 2017
12
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3:00
Balanced Health Today Call Now 1(888)277-4980 Certain diseases can affect the lymph nodes, the spleen, or the collections of lymphoid tissue in certain areas of the body. Lymphadenopathy. This is a condition where the lymph nodes become swollen or enlarged, usually because of a nearby infection. Swollen lymph nodes in the neck, for example, can be caused by a throat infection. Once the infection is treated, the swelling usually goes away. If several lymph node groups throughout the body are swollen, that can indicate a more serious disease that needs further investigation by a doctor. Lymphadenitis. Also called adenitis, this inflammation of the lymph node is caused by an infection of the tissue in the node. The infection can cause the skin overlying the lymph node to swell, redden, and feel warm and tender to the touch. It usually affects the lymph nodes in the neck and is often caused by a bacterial infection that can be easily treated with an antibiotic. Lymphomas. These cancers start in the lymph nodes when lymphocytes undergo changes and start to multiply out of control. The lymph nodes swell, and the cancer cells crowd out healthy cells and may cause tumors solid growths in other parts of the body. Splenomegaly enlarged spleen. In someone who is healthy, the spleen is usually small enough that it can't be felt when you press on the abdomen. But certain diseases can cause the spleen to swell to several times its normal size. Most commonly, this is due to a viral infection, such as mononucleosis. But in some cases, more serious diseases such as cancer can cause the spleen to expand. If you have an enlarged spleen, your doctor will probably tell you to avoid contact sports like football for a while. If you're hit, the swollen spleen is vulnerable to rupturing bursting. And if it ruptures, it can cause a huge amount of blood to be lost. Tonsillitis. Tonsillitis is caused by an infection of the tonsils, the lymphoid tissues in the back of the mouth at the to
19 Apr 2017
4
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2:20
Bottom line is this: your heart is a muscle and it has certain requirements to do its muscle work, which is to contract and relax rhythmically in order to pump your blood. In fact, each day your heart pumps the same five quarts of blood around and around.
20 Apr 2017
2
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2:35
Bottom line is this: your heart is a muscle and it has certain requirements to do its muscle work, which is to contract and relax rhythmically in order to pump your blood. In fact, each day your heart pumps the same five quarts of blood around and around.
20 Apr 2017
1
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2:20
Bottom line is this: your heart is a muscle and it has certain requirements to do its muscle work, which is to contract and relax rhythmically in order to pump your blood. In fact, each day your heart pumps the same five quarts of blood around and around.
20 Apr 2017
5
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2:22
Bottom line is this: your heart is a muscle and it has certain requirements to do its muscle work, which is to contract and relax rhythmically in order to pump your blood. In fact, each day your heart pumps the same five quarts of blood around and around.
20 Apr 2017
21
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2:06
Bottom line is this: your heart is a muscle and it has certain requirements to do its muscle work, which is to contract and relax rhythmically in order to pump your blood. In fact, each day your heart pumps the same five quarts of blood around and around.
20 Apr 2017
2
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2:32
Bottom line is this: your heart is a muscle and it has certain requirements to do its muscle work, which is to contract and relax rhythmically in order to pump your blood. In fact, each day your heart pumps the same five quarts of blood around and around.
20 Apr 2017
4
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6:24
No Control host Chuck reviews Canadian heavy metal band 3 Inches of Blood and plays their latest music video "Goatriders Horde".
19 Jul 2007
1022
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3:40
Bullet for My Valentine - Hand of Blood Guitar Cover
22 Sep 2009
3011
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9:06
*******www.hellmotel**** This video broght to you by Hell Motel - Heavy Metal Community. This video is of 3 Inches Of Blood playing live in concert at Capitol Chaos back in 2005.
16 Jul 2008
191
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