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2:03
This February, Big Idea, Inc. presents an all-new family adventure featuring a helpful lesson in listening to your parents with VeggieTales®: Pistachio – The Little Boy That Woodn’t. In this creative parody of the beloved story of Pinocchio, VeggieTales follows its unique tradition of retelling classic adventures like Lord of the Beans, Wizard of Ha’s and Minnesota Cuke! The DVD includes the brand new Silly Song, “Where Have All The Staplers Gone,” and lots of family friendly bonus features. Pistachio comes to DVD in stores February 27 and March 2, 2010 in Christian and general market stores respectively. Once upon a time in the small town of Bologna-Salami, there lived a lonely toymaker named Gelato and his assistant Cricket. Gelato had no children of his own, so one day he decided to carve a little boy out of wood. Imagine Gelato’s surprise when he learned this little boy could walk…and talk…and definitely had a mind of his own! When Pistachio tries to do things his way, he lands in a “whale” of a situation! Will he decide to listen to the wisdom of a loving father in time to save his whole family from becoming fish food? Find out in this all-new adventure with a lesson about the importance of family and learning to listen.
20 Mar 2010
1961
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3:29
This February, Big Idea, Inc. presents an all-new family adventure featuring a helpful lesson in listening to your parents with VeggieTales®: Pistachio – The Little Boy That Woodn’t. In this creative parody of the beloved story of Pinocchio, VeggieTales follows its unique tradition of retelling classic adventures like Lord of the Beans, Wizard of Ha’s and Minnesota Cuke! The DVD includes the brand new Silly Song, “Where Have All The Staplers Gone,” and lots of family friendly bonus features. Pistachio comes to DVD in stores February 27 and March 2, 2010 in Christian and general market stores respectively. Once upon a time in the small town of Bologna-Salami, there lived a lonely toymaker named Gelato and his assistant Cricket. Gelato had no children of his own, so one day he decided to carve a little boy out of wood. Imagine Gelato’s surprise when he learned this little boy could walk…and talk…and definitely had a mind of his own! When Pistachio tries to do things his way, he lands in a “whale” of a situation! Will he decide to listen to the wisdom of a loving father in time to save his whole family from becoming fish food? Find out in this all-new adventure with a lesson about the importance of family and learning to listen.
5 Mar 2010
2871
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4:12
FlickMojo This puppet's only wish is to become a real boy. Join WatchMojo**** as we explore the origins of Pinocchio.
21 Feb 2012
252
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2:52
Buy the EROTIC ADVENTURES OF PINOCCHIO on DVD here: *******www.j4hi****/page5/page302/EROTIC-ADVENTURES-PINOCCHIO-dvd.html Dyanne Thorne, the woman famous for bringing the character of Ilsa: She-Wolf of the SS to exploitation fans, here plays the angelic Fairy Godmother in THE EROTIC ADVENTURES OF PINOCCHIO (1971). Watch in high quality mode!
17 Feb 2015
4475
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8:34
This is the 1976 television production of Pinocchio starring Sandy Dunkan and Danny Kaye. Made by VIC Entertainment, they own it, not me. Pt. 8 Well...that's the end of the movie...and I ran out of smug remarks...shoot. I hope you all enjoyed the movie!
3 Aug 2009
269
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3:54
Scene from the 1976 TV musical production of Pinocchio starring Sandy Duncan and Danny Kaye.
3 Aug 2009
101
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5:23
Production number from the 1976 TV musical version of Pinocchio starring Sandy Duncan and Danny Kaye.
3 Aug 2009
157
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7:13
"Sans contrefaçon" is a 1987 song recorded by the French artist Mylène Farmer. First single from her second studio album Ainsi soit je. The video, a Polydor production, was filmed by Laurent Boutonnat, about one month after the single's release. For the first time, Farmer participated in the writing of the screenplay, along with Boutonnat. This video was shoot for four days in Cherbourg, France. It was inspired by The Adventures of Pinocchio, a Carlo Collodi's novel for children and Le Petit Cirque by Dargaud. The theme of this video is that of "the alienation: to be prisoner of desires of the other". Lyrics M. Farmer/L. Boutonnat Puisqu'il faut choisir A mots doux je peux le dire Sans contrefaçon Je suis un garçon Et pour un empire Je ne veux me dévêtir Puisque sans contrefaçon Je suis un garçon Tout seul dans mon placard Les yeux cernés de noir A l'abri des regards Je défie le hasard Dans ce monde qui n'a ni queue ni tête Je n'en fais qu'à ma tête Un mouchoir au creux du pantalon Je suis chevalier D'Eon Puisqu'il faut choisir A mots doux je peux le dire Sans contrefaçon Je suis un garçon Et pour un empire Je ne veux me dévêtir Puisque sans contrefaçon Je suis un garçon Tour à tour on me chasse De vos fréquentations Je n'admets qu'on menace Mes résolutions Je me fous bien des qu'en-dira-t'on Je suis caméléon Prenez garde à mes soldats de plomb C'est eux qui vous tueront Puisqu'il faut choisir
21 Sep 2011
5150
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2:43
Download MP3: *******www.pogomix****/downloads My remix of voices, chords and sound effects from Spielberg's 'AI: Artificial Intelligence'. Enjoy! A.I. is a haunting, deeply moving science-fiction about David, a robot-boy "adopted" by a couple whose real son Martin lies hospitalised in a coma. The plot thickens when Martin recovers and deviously instigates David's abandonment, setting him on a vast adventure to find the fictitious Blue Fairy so he can wish for mortality and seek a new acceptance from his mother. The film salutes the tale of Pinocchio without compromising originality, and unfolds with uncanny realism in a frighteningly plausible future. It challenges our distinction between man and machine, and hints carefully at the conflicts of interest people can have in raising children. The visual effects are mind bending as typical of a Spielberg picture, but serve the story commendably without turning the film into an ILM showreel. Combined with the elegant yet characterful scoring of John Williams, this is one film bound to put both your morals and your tear ducts to the test.
4 Mar 2012
3889
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3:24
This review is from: Pinocchio (Disney Gold Classic Collection) (DVD) The one-two whammy of audience and critical indifference to "Pinocchio" and "Fantasia" killed Walt Disney's desire to experiment with the limits of animation in the 1940s. From then on, play it safe was his motto. This may be one of the greatest tragedies to beset popular American culture in the 20th century; despite the depths of pretension and kitch in "Fantasia," it was at least evidence of a spirited mind in pursuit of the unattained -- but "Pinocchio" must have broken old Walt's heart. There are visual effects in this movie that remained unchallenged until the digital age, and it's worth recalling that every single one of them was drawn by hand. It has one of the most beautiful and exciting musical scores in the history of the movies (I can't hear Cliff Edwards' high, pure falsetto holding that final note of "When You Wish Upon a Star" without chills), a deeply plangent sense of emotion that never tips over into bathos, and a wealth of detail that is still staggering after 65 years. But it may be too dark a movie to attain the popularity of more cheerful Disney cartoons like "Snow White" -- although even that one can frighten the tots. "When You Wish upon a Star" is a song written by Leigh Harline and Ned Washington for Walt Disney's 1940 adaptation of Pinocchio. The original version of the song was sung by Cliff Edwards in the character of Jiminy Cricket and is heard over the opening credits and again in the final scene of the film. The song won the Academy Award for Best Original Song that year and has since become an icon of The Walt Disney Company. The American Film Institute ranked "When You Wish Upon A Star" seventh in their 100 Greatest Songs in Film History, the highest ranked Disney animated film song, and also one of only four Disney animated film songs to appear on the list, the others being "Some Day My Prince Will Come" from Snow White and the Seven Dwarfs peaked at nineteenth, "Beauty and the Beast" from Beauty and the Beast peaked at #62, and "Hakuna Matata" from The Lion King, which peaked at #99. The song reached the top five in Billboard's Record Buying Guide, a predecessor of the retail sales chart. Popular versions included Glenn Miller, Guy Lombardo, Horace Heidt and of course, Cliff Edwards. In Japan, Sweden, Finland, Norway and Denmark, the song has become a Christmas song, often referring to the Star of Bethlehem. The Swedish language version is called Ser du stjärnan i det blå, roughly translated: "do you see the star in the blue(sky)", and the Danish title is "Når du ser et stjerneskud", which roughly translates as "When you see a shooting star". In Denmark, Sweden, Finland and Norway the song is played on television every Christmas Eve's day in the traditional Disney one-hour christmas cabaret, and the gathering of the entire family for the watching of this, is considered major Scandinavian tradition. In 2005, Julie Andrews selected the original Cliff Edwards recording for the album Julie Andrews Selects Her Favorite Disney Songs. The song has -- along with Mickey Mouse -- become an icon of The Walt Disney Company. In the 1950s and 60s, Walt Disney used the song in the opening sequences of Walt Disney anthology television series. It has also been used in multiple versions of Walt Disney Pictures' opening logos -- including the present-day logo -- since the 1980s. The ships of the Disney Cruise Line use the first seven notes of the song's melody as their horn signals. Additionally, many productions at Disney theme parks -- particularly fireworks shows and parades -- employ the song.
26 Jun 2012
4095
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