Results for: planet venus Search Results
Family Filter:
0:42
On June 8,2004 ,planet Venus transited the sun and this was visible from earth. This happened for the first time after 110 years. This video was shot without any safety equipment from Bangalore. A direct viewing of the sun didn't reveal the planet but later the clouds covered the glare and showed the planet !
2 Mar 2007
1549
Share Video

0:49
7 hrs compressed into 30 sec, taken from 9pm to 4:30am. Watch Orion rise, followed by the brightest star in the heavens, Sirius. Watch lightning storms on the horizon and clouds barreling towards you. Finally, watch the beautiful planet Venus rise.
24 Nov 2007
600
Share Video

1:42
On 16th May beginning 3.30pm. to 5.30 p.m. depending on location, people in India can notice Lunar Occultation of Planet Venus in the skies. In which view of Planet Venus is obscured by Moon during its course of journey around earth. i.e. Moon will come in between Venus and Earth such a way that Venus for brief time will not be visible.Occultation of Major planet like Venus is only such event for year 2010 notable from India, north Africa, Middle east and South East Asia. For details visit www.ournewplanets**** N.Sri Raghunandan Kumar
13 Jun 2010
567
Share Video

6:21
AIA MANINAM AIA the CREATOR bloGSPOT DDSDTV.bloGSPOT don't type gspot**** (lol, mdr, חחח/ההה, 555, asg, g, rs, mkm, da xiao, da xiao ´ף׀¦, ha هاها, kanji لإ, kkk ¤»¤»¤», jajaja, hi hi) "Blog Till You Drop" PRINCE / BELIEVE 1 Sun 2 Mercury 3 Venus 1 January 21 (3121) In astrology, FRIDAY is connected with the planet Venus. Source:*******en.wikipedia****/wiki/Friday 3121 (pronounced "thirty-one twenty-one") is a studio album by Prince. The album, released March 21, 2006 Source:*******en.wikipedia****/wiki/3121_(album) Prince played 21 concerts in London during the summer of 2007. The Earth Tour included 21 nights at the 20,000 capacity O2 Arena Prince was also listed in Time magazine's 2010 annual ranking of the "100 Most Influential People in the World". Prince released his album 20Ten in July 2010 as a free covermount with publications in the UK, Belgium, Germany, and France. Prince has refused access to the album to digital download services. He also closed his official website, LotusFlow3r****. In an interview with the Daily Mirror, Prince said, "The internet's completely over. I don't see why I should give my new music to iTunes or anyone else. They won't pay me an advance for it and then they get angry when they can't get it... Anyway, all these computers and digital gadgets are no good. They just fill your head with numbers and that can't be good for you." Prince was inducted in the Grammy Hall of Fame on December 7, 2010. Prince became one of Jehovah's Witnesses in 2001 following a two-year-long debate with friend and fellow Jehovah's Witness, musician Larry Graham. Prince said he didn't consider it a conversion, but a "realization"; "It's like Morpheus and Neo in The Matrix", he explained. He attends meetings at a local Kingdom Hall and occasionally knocks on people's doors to discuss his faith. Source:*******en.wikipedia****/wiki/Prince_(musician) Magna est veritas, et prevalebit WHEN I WAS BROKEN YOU CAME AND PUT ME BACK TOGETHER, WHEN I WAS HUNGRY YOU FED ME WHEN I WAS THIRSTY YOU GAVE ME WATER I LEARNED HOW TO LOVE MYSELF AND OTHERS, BECAUSE OF YOU, THANK YOU SHEPHERD. Original video titel:THE KINGDOM OF GOD IS IN YOUR HEART Copyright YouTube Channel:JMS777TV, DDSDTV, shepherdsmusic, 1earthfamily, shivadamour, floridausatv, ParanormalResearchUS Music copyright: Believe, Sony Music Entertainment, EMI Publishing en EMI Publishing FanBoy: Carel
2 Feb 2011
318
Share Video

1:07
I was with my mate unloading the work truck. I looked up and spotted something in the sky it was around 10.45am, The sun is to the right of glowing sphere, I went to the car and grab the handy cam, I have emailed an Observatory in Queensland about it, they emailed me back saying " What you saw is the planet Venus aka 'Morning Star' it rises before sunrise".? not sure about that!
17 Aug 2016
3959
Share Video

2:45
The Planet Venus
19 Nov 2009
316
Share Video

6:58
A brief look at The Planet Venus (Now in HD) and some interesting facts. I hope you enjoy it. Music by Mike Oldfield.
16 Apr 2010
226
Share Video

2:05
Venus the deadliest planet in our solar system.
22 Apr 2010
384
Share Video

10:00
This is a traditional, Puranic, mantra invocation to awaken the energies represented by the planet Venus--or Shukra, in the Vedic Astrological system. A Vedic astrologer would have you chant this planetary mantra to strengthen the good aspects of the force, and weaken any negative aspects preventing the blossoming of the planets full potential. The image of the male in front of the horse, and sitting in meditation, is Shukra, who represents the planet Venus; however, Goddess Lakshmi is the ...
5 Apr 2009
1068
Share Video

5:33
Baby... grab your tube of red lipstick and pucker up for a love fest on the planet Venus. A space mission to Venus encounters a population of sexy women led by the evil Queen Yllana. All of Venus's men have been wiped out, and now that's she met Earth men, Yllana wants all them dead, too. Only Venusian scientist Talleah (Zsa Zsa Gabor) helps the crew attempt to defeat the wicked queen and restore men to her planet.
10 Dec 2010
203
Share Video

22:09
Why did Earth thrive and our sister planet, Venus, died? From the fires of a sun's birth... twin planets emerged. Then their paths diverged. Nature draped one world in the greens and blues of life. While enveloping the other in acid clouds... high heat... and volcanic flows. Why did Venus take such a disastrous turn? For as long as we have gazed upon the stars, they have offered few signs... that somewhere out there... are worlds as rich and diverse as our own. Recently, though, astronomers have found ways to see into the bright lights of nearby stars. They've been discovering planets at a rapid clip... using observatories like NASA's Kepler space telescope... A French observatory known as Corot ... .And an array of ground-based instruments. The count is approaching 500... and rising. These alien worlds run the gamut... from great gas giants many times the size of our Jupiter... to rocky, charred remnants that burned when their parent star exploded. Some have wild elliptical orbits... swinging far out into space... then diving into scorching stellar winds. Still others orbit so close to their parent stars that their surfaces are likely bathed in molten rock. Amid these hostile realms, a few bear tantalizing hints of water or ice... ingredients needed to nurture life as we know it. The race to find other Earths has raised anew the ancient question... whether, out in the folds of our galaxy, planets like our own are abundant... and life commonplace? Or whether Earth is a rare Garden of Eden in a barren universe? With so little direct evidence of these other worlds to go on, we have only the stories of planets within our own solar system to gauge the chances of finding another Earth. Consider, for example, a world that has long had the look and feel of a life-bearing planet. Except for the moon, there's no brighter light in our night skies than the planet Venus... known as both the morning and the evening star. The ancient Romans named it for their goddess of beauty and love. In time, the master painters transformed this classical symbol into an erotic figure. It was a scientist, Galileo Galilei, who demystified planet Venus... charting its phases as it moved around the sun, drawing it into the ranks of the other planets. With a similar size and weight, Venus became known as Earth's sister planet. But how Earth-like is it? The Russian scientist Mikkhail Lomonosov caught a tantalizing hint in 1761. As Venus passed in front of the Sun, he witnessed a hair thin luminescence on its edge. Venus, he found, has an atmosphere. Later observations revealed a thick layer of clouds. Astronomers imagined they were made of water vapor, like those on Earth. Did they obscure stormy, wet conditions below? And did anyone, or anything, live there? NASA sent Mariner 2 to Venus in 1962... in the first-ever close planetary encounter. Its instruments showed that Venus is nothing at all like Earth. Rather, it's extremely hot, with an atmosphere made up mostly of carbon dioxide. The data showed that Venus rotates very slowly... only once every 243 Earth days... and it goes in the opposite direction. American and Soviet scientists found out just how strange Venus is when they sent a series of landers down to take direct readings. Surface temperatures are almost 900 degrees Fahrenheit, hot enough to melt lead, with the air pressure 90 times higher than at sea level on Earth. The air is so thick that it's not a gas, but a "supercritical fluid." Liquid CO2. On our planet, the only naturally occurring source is in the high-temperature, high-pressure environments of undersea volcanoes. It comes in handy for extracting caffeine from coffee beans... or drycleaning our clothes. You just wouldn't want to have to breathe it. The Soviet Venera landers sent back pictures showing that Venus is a vast garden of rock, with no water in sight. In fact, if you were to smooth out the surface of Venus, all the water in the atmosphere would be just 3 centimeters deep. Compare that to Earth... where the oceans would form a layer 3 kilometers deep. If you could land on Venus, you'd be treated to tranquil vistas and sunset skies, painted in orange hues. The winds are light, only a few miles per hour... but the air is so thick that a breeze would knock you over. Look up and you'd see fast-moving clouds... streaking around the planet at 300 kilometers per hour. These clouds form a dense high-altitude layer, from 45 to 66 kilometers above the surface. The clouds are so dense and reflective that Venus absorbs much less solar energy than Earth, even though it's 30% closer to the Sun.
31 Jan 2012
3978
Share Video

0:30
The Transit of Venus is a rare astrological event of the passage of the planet Venus between the Earth and the sun. Scott Pelley reports on the live images seen from a telescope in Hawaii.
15 Sep 2012
134
Share Video

9:33
This video explores the most basic question of all: why we explore space? Be sure to experience the visual spectacle in full HD, 1080P. The Mars rover, Curiosity, is the latest in a long line of missions to Mars: landers sent to scoop its soil and study its rocks, orbiters sent to map its valleys and ridges. They are all asking the same question. Did liquid water once flow on this dry and dusty world? Did it support life in any form? And are there remnants left to find? The science that comes out of these missions may help answer a much larger, more philosophical question. Is our planet Earth the norm, in a galaxy run through with life-bearing planets? Or is Earth a rare gem, with a unique make-up and history that allowed it to give rise to living things? On Mars, Curiosity has spotted pebbles and other rocks commonly associated with flowing water. It found them down stream on what appears to be an ancient river fan, where water flowed down into Gale Crater. This shows that at some point in the past, Mars had an atmosphere, cloudy skies, and liquid water flowing. So what could have turned it into the desolate world we know today? One process that very likely played a role goes by the unscientific name, "sputtering." Like the other planets in our solar system, Mars is lashed by high-energy photons from the Sun. When one of these photons enters the atmosphere of a planet, it can crash into a molecule, knocking loose an electron and turning it into an ion. The solar wind brings something else: a giant magnetic field. When part of the field grazes the planet, it can attract ions and launch them out into space. Another part might fling ions right into the atmosphere at up to a thousand kilometers per second. The ions crash into other molecules, sending them in all directions like balls in a game of pool. Over billions of years, this process could have literally stripped Mars of its atmosphere, especially in the early life of the solar system when the solar wind was more intense than it is today. Sputtering has actually been spotted directly on another dead planet, Venus. The Venus Express mission found that solar winds are steadily stripping off lighter molecules of hydrogen and oxygen. They escape the planet on the night side... then ride solar breezes on out into space. This process has left Venus with an atmosphere dominated by carbon dioxide gas... a heat trapping compound that has helped send surface temperatures up to around 400 degrees Celsius. The loss of Venus' atmosphere likely took place over millions of years, especially during solar outbursts known as coronal mass ejections. If these massive blast waves stripped Venus and Mars of an atmosphere capable of supporting life how did Earth avoid the same grim fate? We can see the answer as the solar storm approaches earth. Our planet has what Mars and Venus lack - a powerful magnetic field generated deep within its core. This protective shield deflects many of the high-energy particles launched by the Sun. In fact, that's just our first line of defense. Much of the solar energy that gets through is reflected back to space by clouds, ice, and snow. The energy that earth absorbs is just enough to power a remarkable planetary engine: the climate. It's set in motion by the uneveness of solar heating, due in part to the cycles of day and night, and the seasons. That causes warm, tropical winds to blow toward the poles, and cold polar air toward the equator. Wind currents drive surface ocean currents. This computer simulation shows the Gulf Stream winding its way along the coast of North America. This great ocean river carries enough heat energy to power the industrial world a hundred times over. It breaks down in massive whirlpools that spread warm tropical waters over northern seas. Below the surface, they mix with cold deep currents that swirl around undersea ledges and mountains. Earth's climate engine has countless moving parts: tides and terrain, cross winds and currents -- all working to equalize temperatures around the globe. Over time, earth developed a carbon cycle and an effective means of regulating green house gases. In our galaxy, are still-born worlds like Mars the norm? Or in Earth, has Nature crafted a prototype for its greatest experiment... Life?
26 Apr 2013
4153
Share Video

25:06
Watch this updated full res 1080p version of our classic show. Why did Earth thrive and our sister planet, Venus, died? From the fires of a sun's birth... twin planets emerged. Then their paths diverged. Nature draped one world in the greens and blues of life. While enveloping the other in acid clouds... high heat... and volcanic flows. Why did Venus take such a disastrous turn? For as long as we have gazed upon the stars, they have offered few signs... that somewhere out there... are worlds as rich and diverse as our own. Recently, though, astronomers have found ways to see into the bright lights of nearby stars. They've been discovering planets at a rapid clip... using observatories like NASA's Kepler space telescope... A French observatory known as Corot ... .And an array of ground-based instruments. The count is approaching 500... and rising. These alien worlds run the gamut... from great gas giants many times the size of our Jupiter... to rocky, charred remnants that burned when their parent star exploded. Some have wild elliptical orbits... swinging far out into space... then diving into scorching stellar winds. Still others orbit so close to their parent stars that their surfaces are likely bathed in molten rock. Amid these hostile realms, a few bear tantalizing hints of water or ice... ingredients needed to nurture life as we know it. The race to find other Earths has raised anew the ancient question... whether, out in the folds of our galaxy, planets like our own are abundant... and life commonplace? Or whether Earth is a rare Garden of Eden in a barren universe? With so little direct evidence of these other worlds to go on, we have only the stories of planets within our own solar system to gauge the chances of finding another Earth. Consider, for example, a world that has long had the look and feel of a life-bearing planet. Except for the moon, there's no brighter light in our night skies than the planet Venus... known as both the morning and the evening star. The ancient Romans named it for their goddess of beauty and love. In time, the master painters transformed this classical symbol into an erotic figure. It was a scientist, Galileo Galilei, who demystified planet Venus... charting its phases as it moved around the sun, drawing it into the ranks of the other planets. With a similar size and weight, Venus became known as Earth's sister planet. But how Earth-like is it? The Russian scientist Mikkhail Lomonosov caught a tantalizing hint in 1761. As Venus passed in front of the Sun, he witnessed a hair thin luminescence on its edge. Venus, he found, has an atmosphere. Later observations revealed a thick layer of clouds. Astronomers imagined they were made of water vapor, like those on Earth. Did they obscure stormy, wet conditions below? And did anyone, or anything, live there? NASA sent Mariner 2 to Venus in 1962... in the first-ever close planetary encounter. Its instruments showed that Venus is nothing at all like Earth. Rather, it's extremely hot, with an atmosphere made up mostly of carbon dioxide. The data showed that Venus rotates very slowly... only once every 243 Earth days... and it goes in the opposite direction. American and Soviet scientists found out just how strange Venus is when they sent a series of landers down to take direct readings. Surface temperatures are almost 900 degrees Fahrenheit, hot enough to melt lead, with the air pressure 90 times higher than at sea level on Earth. The air is so thick that it's not a gas, but a "supercritical fluid." Liquid CO2. On our planet, the only naturally occurring source is in the high-temperature, high-pressure environments of undersea volcanoes. It comes in handy for extracting caffeine from coffee beans... or drycleaning our clothes. You just wouldn't want to have to breathe it. The Soviet Venera landers sent back pictures showing that Venus is a vast garden of rock, with no water in sight. In fact, if you were to smooth out the surface of Venus, all the water in the atmosphere would be just 3 centimeters deep. Compare that to Earth... where the oceans would form a layer 3 kilometers deep. If you could land on Venus, you'd be treated to tranquil vistas and sunset skies, painted in orange hues. The winds are light, only a few miles per hour... but the air is so thick that a breeze would knock you over. Look up and you'd see fast-moving clouds... streaking around the planet at 300 kilometers per hour. These clouds form a dense high-altitude layer, from 45 to 66 kilometers above the surface. The clouds are so dense and reflective that Venus absorbs much less solar energy than Earth, even though it's 30% closer to the Sun.
7 Jan 2014
4057
Share Video