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3:05
Plutonium - Live show at the Red Sea Jazz Festival, 1999 Arnon Palty - Bass & Leadership Nir Yaniv - Lead Vocal Amos Hadani - Guitar Idan Sochovolsky - Keyboards Nimrod Elisar - Drums Gabi Frank - Lead Trumpet Udi Chontkovsky - 2nd Trumpet Tomer George Cohen - Sax Yuval Tabechnik - Sax Oded Meir - Trombone Music & Lyrics by Arnon Palty
26 Aug 2008
299
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3:49
Ambient Industrial made by CHASMA in Studio Reichtag 2009.
28 May 2009
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13:01
Recorded in Honolulu, Hawaii, on April 23, 1993. Featuring: Francesco Crosara (keyboards), Aaron Aranita (tenor sax), John Kolivas (bass), Giancarlo Aru (drums).
12 Sep 2011
129
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1:15
www.laureltreeproductions**** What would you do with a Time Machine?
6 Nov 2011
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3:35
A Hero made out of Plutonium, what else could you ask for
3 Sep 2007
324
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0:30
crazy crap about Pluto, plutonium. I dunno
4 Mar 2008
158
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1:27
North Korea on Friday destroyed a water cooling tower at a facility where officials acknowledge they extracted plutonium to build nuclear weapons. For more log on to AmericasReport****. Video credit CNN USA
27 Jun 2008
860
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0:40
Pakistan's nuclear weapons program was established in 1972 by Zulfiqar Ali Bhutto, who founded the program while he was Minister for Fuel, Power and Natural Resources, and later became President and Prime Minister. Shortly after the loss of East Pakistan in the 1971 war with India, Bhutto initiated the program with a meeting of physicists and engineers at Multan in January 1972. India's 1974 testing of a nuclear "device" gave Pakistan's nuclear program new momentum. Through the late 1970s, Pakistan's program acquired sensitive uranium enrichment technology and expertise. The 1975 arrival of Dr. Abdul Qadeer Khan considerably advanced these efforts. Dr. Khan is a German-trained metallurgist who brought with him knowledge of gas centrifuge technologies that he had acquired through his position at the classified URENCO uranium enrichment plant in the Netherlands. Dr. Khan also reportedly brought with him stolen uranium enrichment technologies from Europe. He was put in charge of building, equipping and operating Pakistan's Kahuta facility, which was established in 1976. Under Khan's direction, Pakistan employed an extensive clandestine network in order to obtain the necessary materials and technology for its developing uranium enrichment capabilities. In 1985, Pakistan crossed the threshold of weapons-grade uranium production, and by 1986 it is thought to have produced enough fissile material for a nuclear weapon. Pakistan continued advancing its uranium enrichment program, and according to Pakistani sources, the nation acquired the ability to carry out a nuclear explosion in 1987. # Pakistan Nuclear Weapons - A Chronology Nuclear Tests On May 28, 1998 Pakistan announced that it had successfully conducted five nuclear tests. The Pakistani Atomic Energy Commission reported that the five nuclear tests conducted on May 28 generated a seismic signal of 5.0 on the Richter scale, with a total yield of up to 40 KT (equivalent TNT). Dr. A.Q. Khan claimed that one device was a boosted fission device and that the other four were sub-kiloton nuclear devices. On May 30, 1998 Pakistan tested one more nuclear warhead with a reported yield of 12 kilotons. The tests were conducted at Balochistan, bringing the total number of claimed tests to six. It has also been claimed by Pakistani sources that at least one additional device, initially planned for detonation on 30 May 1998, remained emplaced underground ready for detonation. Pakistani claims concerning the number and yields of their underground tests cannot be independently confirmed by seismic means, and several sources, such as the Southern Arizona Seismic Observatory have reported lower yields than those claimed by Pakistan. Indian sources have also suggested that as few as two weapons were actually detonated, each with yields considerably lower than claimed by Pakistan. However, seismic data showed at least two and possibly a third, much smaller, test in the initial round of tests at the Ras Koh range. The single test on 30 May provided a clear seismic signal. DEVICE DATE YIELD [announced] YIELD [estimated] [boosted device?] 28 May 1998 25-36 kiloton total 9-12 kiloton Fission device 28 May 1998 12 kiloton Low-yield device 28 May 1998 sub-kiloton -- Low-yield device 28 May 1998 sub-kiloton -- Low-yield device 28 May 1998 sub-kiloton -- Fission device 30 May 1998 12 kiloton 4-6 kiloton Fission device not detonated 12 kiloton -- This table lists the nuclear tests that Pakistan claims to have carried out in May 1998 as well as the announced yields. Other sources have reported lower yields than those claimed by Pakistan. The Southern Arizona Seismic Observatory reports that the total seismic yield for the May 28th tests was 9-12 kilotons and that the yield for the May 30th tests was 4-6 kilotons. According to a preliminary analysis conducted at Los Alamos National Laboratory, material released into the atmosphere during an underground nuclear test by Pakistan in May 1998 contained low levels of weapons-grade plutonium. The significance of the Los Alamos finding was that Pakistan had either imported or produced plutonium undetected by the US intelligence community. But Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory and other agencies later contested the accuracy of this finding. These tests came slightly more than two weeks after India carried out five nuclear tests of its own on May 11 and 13 and after many warnings by Pakistani officials that they would respond to India. Pakistan's nuclear tests were followed by the February 1999 Lahore Agreements between Prime Ministers Vajpayee and Sharif. The agreements included confidence building measures such as advance notice of ballistic missile testing and a continuation of their unilateral moratoria on nuclear testing. But diplomatic advances made that year were undermined by Pakistan's incursion into Kargil. Under US diplomatic pressure, Prime Minister Sharif withdrew his troops, but lost power in October 1999 due to a military coup in which Gen. Pervez Musharraf took over. # Satellite Imagery of Pakistan's May 28 and May 30 nuclear testing sites Nuclear Infrastructure Pakistan's nuclear program is based primarily on highly enriched uranium (HEU), which is produced at the A. Q. Khan research laboratory at Kahuta, a gas centrifuge uranium enrichment facility. The Kahuta facility has been in operation since the early 1980s. By the early 1990s, Kahuta had an estimated 3,000 centrifuges in operation, and Pakistan continued its pursuit of expanded uranium enrichment capabilities. In the 1990s Pakistan began to pursue plutonium production capabilities. With Chinese assistance, Pakistan built the 40 MWt (megawatt thermal) Khusab research reactor at Joharabad, and in April 1998, Pakistan announced that the reactor was operational. According to public statements made by US officials, this unsafeguarded heavy water reactor generates an estimated 8-10 kilotons of weapons grade plutonium per year, which is enough for one to two nuclear weapons. The reactor could also produce tritium if it were loaded with lithium-6. According to J. Cirincione of Carnegie, Khusab's plutonium production capacity could allow Pakistan to develop lighter nuclear warheads that would be easier to deliver with a ballistic missile. Plutonium separation reportedly takes place at the New Labs reprocessing plant next to Pakistan's Institute of Nuclear Science and Technology (Pinstech) in Rawalpindi and at the larger Chasma nuclear power plant, neither of which are subject to IAEA inspection. Nuclear Arsenal The Natural Resources Defense Council (NRDC) estimates that Pakistan has built 24-48 HEU-based nuclear warheads, and Carnegie reports that they have produced 585-800 kg of HEU, enough for 30-55 weapons. Pakistan's nuclear warheads are based on an implosion design that uses a solid core of highly enriched uranium and requires an estimated 15-20 kg of material per warhead. According to Carnegie, Pakistan has also produced a small but unknown quantity of weapons grade plutonium, which is sufficient for an estimated 3-5 nuclear weapons. Pakistani authorities claim that their nuclear weapons are not assembled. They maintain that the fissile cores are stored separately from the non-nuclear explosives packages, and that the warheads are stored separately from the delivery systems. In a 2001 report, the Defense Department contends that "Islamabad's nuclear weapons are probably stored in component form" and that "Pakistan probably could assemble the weapons fairly quickly." However, no one has been able to ascertain the validity of Pakistan's assurances about their nuclear weapons security. Pakistan's reliance primarily on HEU makes its fissile materials particularly vulnerable to diversion. HEU can be used in a relatively simple gun-barrel-type design, which could be within the means of non-state actors that intend to assemble a crude nuclear weapon. The terrorist attacks on September 11th raised concerns about the security of Pakistan's nuclear arsenal. According to press reports, within two days of the attacks, Pakistan's military began relocating nuclear weapons components to six new secret locations. Shortly thereafter, Gen. Pervez Musharraf fired his intelligence chief and other officers and detained several suspected retired nuclear weapons scientists, in an attempt to root out extremist elements that posed a potential threat to Pakistan's nuclear arsenal. Concerns have also been raised about Pakistan as a proliferant of nuclear materials and expertise. In November, 2002, shortly after North Korea admitted to pursuing a nuclear weapons program, the press reported allegations that Pakistan had provided assistance in the development of its uranium enrichment program in exchange for North Korean missile technologies. Foreign Assistance In the past, China played a major role in the development of Pakistan's nuclear infrastructure, especially when increasingly stringent export controls in western countries made it difficult for Pakistan to acquire materials and technology elsewhere. According to a 2001 Department of Defense report, China has supplied Pakistan with nuclear materials and expertise and has provided critical assistance in the construction of Pakistan's nuclear facilities. In the 1990s, China designed and supplied the heavy water Khusab reactor, which plays a key role in Pakistan's production of plutonium. A subsidiary of the China National Nuclear Corporation also contributed to Pakistan's efforts to expand its uranium enrichment capabilities by providing 5,000 custom made ring magnets, which are a key component of the bearings that facilitate the high-speed rotation of centrifuges. According to Anthony Cordesman of CSIS, China is also reported to have provided Pakistan with the design of one of its warheads, which is relatively sophisticated in design and lighter than U.S. and Soviet designed first generation warheads. China also provided technical and material support in the completion of the Chasma nuclear power reactor and plutonium reprocessing facility, which was built in the mid 1990s. The project had been initiated as a cooperative program with France, but Pakistan's failure to sign the NPT and unwillingness to accept IAEA safeguards on its entire nuclear program caused France to terminate assistance. According to the Defense Department report cited above, Pakistan has also acquired nuclear related and dual-use and equipment and materials from the Former Soviet Union and Western Europe. Intermittent US Sanctions On several occasions, under the authority of amendments to the Foreign Assistance Act, the U.S. has imposed sanctions on Pakistan, cutting off economic and military aid as a result of its pursuit of nuclear weapons. However, the U.S. suspended sanctions each time developments in Afghanistan made Pakistan a strategically important "frontline state," such as the 1981 Soviet occupation and in the war on terrorism. Pakistan's Nuclear Doctrine Several sources, such as Jane's Intelligence Review and Defense Department reports maintain that Pakistan's motive for pursuing a nuclear weapons program is to counter the threat posed by its principal rival, India, which has superior conventional forces and nuclear weapons. Pakistan has not signed the Non-Proliferation Treaty (NPT) or the Comprehensive Test Ban Treaty (CTBT). According to the Defense Department report cited above, "Pakistan remains steadfast in its refusal to sign the NPT, stating that it would do so only after India joined the Treaty. Consequently, not all of Pakistan's nuclear facilities are under IAEA safeguards. Pakistani officials have stated that signature of the CTBT is in Pakistan's best interest, but that Pakistan will do so only after developing a domestic consensus on the issue, and have disavowed any connection with India's decision." Pakistan does not abide by a no-first-use doctrine, as evidenced by President Pervez Musharraf's statements in May, 2002. Musharraf said that Pakistan did not want a conflict with India but that if it came to war between the nuclear-armed rivals, he would "respond with full might." These statements were interpreted to mean that if pressed by an overwhelming conventional attack from India, which has superior conventional forces, Pakistan might use its nuclear weapons.
31 Dec 2008
19110
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2:01
Lunar moorings version 1. I can’t go on I was sleeping in a tent On an asteroid, near neptune I was asking for directions To the next dimension Then I took my tardis To go to where the heart is To go to where the heart is By the window of the hallway You and I were talking Like bunnies sneezing softly As the lampposts started lighting I lost my lunar moorings Plutonium imploding softly I am sliding off the axis chorus When you left that morning Satellites winking homeward
13 Jan 2009
62
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3:16
Lunar moorings version 2 I can’t go on I was sleeping in a tent On an asteroid, near neptune I was asking for directions To the next dimension Then I took my tardis To go to where the heart is To go to where the heart is By the window of the hallway You and I were talking Like bunnies sneezing softly As the lampposts started lighting I lost my lunar moorings Plutonium imploding softly I am sliding off the axis chorus When you left that morning Satellites winking homeward
13 Jan 2009
72
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4:22
Veit Lindau hat eine Lösung für das Leben mit Risiko, Verantwortung, Nachhaltigkeit und Disziplin. Veit´s Traum ist, dass die Menschen, mit denen er arbeitet, in einiger Zeit gar keine Bezeichnung mehr für das haben, was sie beruflich tun. Für Veit Lindau ist die größte Umweltverschmutzung nicht Plutonium, Plastikmüll oder CO² in der Luft, für ihn ist die größte Umweltverschmutzung ein Mensch, der nicht sich selbst lebt. Für ihn hat jeder Menschen eine Verabredung mit dem Leben, nicht um etwas zu bekommen, sondern um anderen etwas zu schenken. Es geht in diesem Workshop um die Beantwortung von vier Fragen: * Worum? Worum geht es in Ihrem Leben? Wer diese Frage beantworten kann, wer dem inneren Ruf folgt, dem folgt der weltliche Erfolg automatisch. * Warum sollten Sie Ihrem inneren Ruf folgen? Gründe dafür gibt es genügend... * Was ist es? Veit Lindau hat 18 Jahre gebraucht, um seinen inneren Ruf wahrzunehmen, und so nimmt er Sie mit auf die Reise, um Ihren inneren Ruf klarer zu spüren. Der Einsatz des Großhirns ist dabei durchaus gefragt, denn der innere Ruf muss oft genau definiert und spezifiziert werden. Dabei hilft Passion ("Leidenschaft"), Ihre Werte (und was genau bedeuten diese für Sie?), * Wie setzt man dies nun um? Das Wichtigste dafür sind Klarheit, Integrität und Disziplin. Mehr Informationen finden Sie unter *******www.dvd-wissen****
17 Jun 2009
170
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4:23
VVeit´s Traum ist, dass die Menschen, mit denen er arbeitet, in einiger Zeit gar keine Bezeichnung mehr für das haben, was sie beruflich tun. Für Veit Lindau ist die größte Umweltverschmutzung nicht Plutonium, Plastikmüll oder CO² in der Luft, für ihn ist die größte Umweltverschmutzung ein Mensch, der nicht sich selbst lebt. Für ihn hat jeder Menschen eine Verabredung mit dem Leben, nicht um etwas zu bekommen, sondern um anderen etwas zu schenken. Es geht in diesem Workshop um die Beantwortung von vier Fragen: * Worum geht es in Ihrem Leben? Wer diese Frage beantworten kann, wer dem inneren Ruf folgt, dem folgt der weltliche Erfolg automatisch. * Warum sollten Sie Ihrem inneren Ruf folgen? Gründe dafür gibt es genügend... * Was ist es? Veit Lindau nimmt Sie mit auf die Reise, um Ihren inneren Ruf klarer zu spüren. Der Einsatz des Großhirns ist dabei durchaus gefragt, denn der innere Ruf muss oft genau definiert und spezifiziert werden. Dabei hilft Passion ("Leidenschaft") und Ihre Werte (und was genau bedeuten diese für Sie?). * Wie setzt man dies nun um? Das Wichtigste dafür sind Klarheit, Integrität und Disziplin. Mehr Informationen findne sie unter *******www.veitlindau****
19 Jun 2009
460
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2:13
The bomber assigned to drop the first plutonium bomb on to Nagasaki is nearly stopped by clouds covering the city keeping them from identifying their target.
21 Oct 2009
112
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6:24
On the program: - As negotiations with Native American tribes drag on, Interior Secretary Ken Salazar says he'll step in and make the final call on Cape Wind next month. - The energy industry gathers in Washington. Clean Skies News talks to the president of NRG Energy about what the nuclear industry wants to see from policy. To see the entire interview, click HERE. - Another global warming claim by the IPCC comes under scrutiny. - Energy is on the agenda for Russian President Dmitry Medvedev's trip to France.- Tennessee Valley Authority will consider using fuel made from weapons-grade plutonium to power two of its plants.
11 Mar 2010
26
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2:25
“Now to North Korea, where an American nuclear scientists says he is “stunned” by their large new uranium enrichment facility.” (NBC) The latest bombshell regarding nuclear weapons was uncovered Sunday morning – as a brand new nuclear facility in North Korea was discovered. The facility was described as surprisingly advanced – and also equipped with hundreds of centrifuges. The leak has the media questioning what’s really going on in North Korea. HLN didn’t seem surprised by the facility and says that the U.S. knew this might be happening. “North Korea already has nukes based on plutonium. So the new facility suggests that it may also be trying to build uranium ones. A senior white official says that the U.S. suspected North Korea was doing this.” On Fox News Bill Kristol of the Weekly Standard calls it another act of deception by North Korea – and says we the U.S. should be concerned. “They have managed to cheat and deceive once again, and construct a whole uranium enrichment facility, apparently unbeknownst to us. Maybe we did know about it, and haven’t talked about it, but there’s no evidence of that, which makes one worried about what else is happening in North Korea, and there proliferation of such weapons. And we’ve had a bipartisan failure in Korean policy for quite a long time.” And CNN echoes that fear – saying North Korea continues to violate NATO resolutions – while also not holding their word. “It is North Korea continuing on a path that is destabilizing for the region. It confirms, or validates, the concern we’ve had for years about their enriching uranium, which they’ve denied routinely. … It violates what they said they do in 2005, with respect to getting to the six party talks. So they are a country that we are routinely unable to believe they’d do what they say.” And South Korea’s JoonAng Daily says nobody should believe the North’s explanation for the facility – and that South Korea’s government is taking it very seriously. “But no one would believe North Korea’s explanation, as there is no need to construct a massive enrichment facility only to produce low-enriched uranium. The United States immediately sent Special Representative for North Korea Policy Stephen Bosworth to South Korea, China and Japan to deal with the situation, and our government is also paying close attention to that.”
23 Nov 2010
555
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9:54
Directed by Michael Apted. With Pierce Brosnan, Sophie Marceau, Robert Carlyle. James Bond uncovers a nuclear plot when he protects an oil heiress from her After fending off the hit squad, Bond visits a casino owned by his acquaintance, Valentin Zukovsky (Robbie Coltrane), to acquire information about Elektra's attackers; he discovers that Elektra's head of security, Davidov (Ulrich Thomsen), is secretly in league with Renard. After spending a night with Elektra, then stowing away in Davidov's car to a nearby airstrip, Bond kills him and boards a plane bound for a Russian ICBM base in Kazakhstan. There, Bond poses as Russian nuclear scientist Mikhail Arkov (Jeff Nuttall) to enter the silo and find out why Renard's men are there. He is tailed closely by Dr. Christmas Jones (Denise Richards), an American nuclear physicist who is suspicious of his identity. Inside the silo, Bond watches as Renard removes the GPS locator card and a half quantity of weapons-grade plutonium from a bomb. Before Bond can kill him, Christmas blows his cover and Renard steals the bomb and flees, leaving everyone to die in the booby-trapped missile silo. Bond escapes the exploding silo with Christmas in tow, but not before retrieving the locator card.
1 Dec 2010
2342
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