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21:20
Heavy metals are dangerous because they tend to bioaccumulate. Bioaccumulation means an increase in the concentration of a chemical in a biological organism over time, compared to the chemical's concentration in the environment. Compounds accumulate in living things any time they are taken up and stored faster than they are broken down (metabolized) or excreted. Heavy metals can enter a water supply by industrial and consumer waste, or even from acidic rain breaking down soils and releasing heavy metals into streams, lakes, rivers, and groundwater. Heavy metal toxicity can result in damaged or reduced mental and central nervous function, lower energy levels, and damage to blood composition, lungs, kidneys, liver, and other vital organs. Long-term exposure may result in slowly progressing physical, muscular, and neurological degenerative processes that mimic Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease, muscular dystrophy, and multiple sclerosis. Allergies are not uncommon and repeated long-term contact with some metals or their compounds may even cause cancer (International Occupational Safety and Health Information Centre 1999). The association of symptoms indicative of acute toxicity is not difficult to recognize because the symptoms are usually severe, rapid in onset, and associated with a known exposure or ingestion (Ferner 2001): cramping, nausea, and vomiting; pain; sweating; headaches; difficulty breathing; impaired cognitive, motor, and language skills; mania; and convulsions. The symptoms of toxicity resulting from chronic exposure (impaired cognitive, motor, and language skills; learning difficulties; nervousness and emotional instability; and insomnia, nausea, lethargy, and feeling ill) are also easily recognized; however, they are much more difficult to associate with their cause. Symptoms of chronic exposure are very similar to symptoms of other health conditions and often develop slowly over months or even years. Sometimes the symptoms of chronic expo
23 Jun 2017
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9:22
Wow poison!
22 Jun 2017
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21:21
The first step in treating chemical poisoning is preventing its occurrence. Most cases of chemical poisoning are due to such incidents as accidental ingestion of household chemicals by small children. These are highly preventable by taking safety steps, such as childproofing the home and keeping chemicals and medications out of the reach of small children. It is also important to follow all manufacturers' instructions for the safe use of household chemicals, such as pesticides, to avoid accidental chemical poisoning. The treatment plan for chemical poisoning varies widely, depending on the toxin or toxicant involved, the length of exposure, the severity of symptoms, person's age and medical history, and other factors. Treatment of a very mild case of chemical poisoning may involve simply observing a person until all potential effects of a chemical have worn off. On the other end of the scale, rigorous treatment in an emergency care and intensive care setting is required for many cases. In some cases, it may be possible to reverse the effects of a chemical poisoning, such as with the use of antivenom for a snakebite. Another example is the use of the medication naloxone (Narcan) to reverse the respiratory depression effects of a narcotic overdose. Amyl nitrite is a substance that can reverse the effects of cyanide poisoning. These types of antidotes must be used within a certain time frame before irreversible damage occurs. In addition, many chemicals do not have antidotes to poisoning.
19 Jun 2017
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21:20
Do you have heavy metals in your water? Most heavy metals in our water supply cannot be detected by sight, smell or taste. The only way to detect the presence of heavy metals is through a water test. You may expect the today’s town water supply is safe but here is a quote form NZ Ministry of Heaths web site: “About 1.1 million New Zealanders were supplied with drinking-water during 2003 that failed to comply with the current DWS2000 Standards” There are serious health risks from drinking water with excessive levels of heavy metals with many of them affecting the brain. See the links below for more information on this.
17 Jun 2017
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0:16
a rat a strikebreaker a rat terrier a rate law relates a rated games a rated soldier will a ratio a ratio is defined as a ratio that compares a number to 100 a rational decisionmaker a rattlesnake b rated b rated actors b rated bonds b rated gun safe b rated horror movies b rated movies b rated safe b rated sci fi movies b rating restaurant nyc b rations c rate battery c rated bonds c rated games c rated safe c rated tires c rating on lipo c ration cigarettes c rations c rations definition c rations vietnam d rated malls d rated movies d rated tires d rated trailer tires d rating d rating on tv d ratio d ration d ration mold d rattlesnake rat rat a tat rat a tat cat rat a tat cat rules rat adoption rat anatomy rat and boa rat and mouse rat and puff rat as a pet rat attack rat babies rat bait rat balls rat band rat bastard rat bite rat bite fever rat boy rat brain rat breeds rat cage rat care rat cartoon rat catcher rat catchers osrs rat cheese rat chef rat clipart rat colors rat control rat definition rat diagram rat diet rat digestive system rat diseases rat dissection rat dissection labeled rat distortion rat drawing rat droppings rat fink rat lungworm rat pack rat poison rat race rat race cast rat rod rat snake rat terrier rat traps ratatouille ratchet ratchet and clank rate my professor rate my teacher ratio rational numbers rattlesnake
15 Jun 2017
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21:20
Whether they are bought from the chemist or the supermarket, and whether or not they feature the mention “hypoallergenic,” “paraben free” or “dermatologically tested,” many cosmetics contain chemical and allergen substances, preservatives and especially endocrine disruptors, which can have an effect on the hormonal system. Potentially, these chemical substances are dangerous, particularly for pregnant women and young children. Some doctors are even saying they carry a cancer risk. So what are the real risks? Why are some pharmaceutical companies still using these substances? insiders investigates. A natural start to life Augusta is four months old. For Bozena, her mother, there is no question of her using any products containing these chemicals. For example, the body lotion she uses is an oil and calcium liniment; a mixture based on olive oil, 100 percent natural. “Companies tend to add a lot of useless products, like preservatives, containing lots of endocrine disruptors, and I think that not only are they unnecessary, they are harmful to health, for adults and even more so for young babies,” said Bozena. Bozena is one of the small majority of mothers who actually read the labels on cosmetics.
9 Jun 2017
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15:28
The lymphatic system consists of all lymphatic vessels and lymphoid organs. For example, the lymph nodes, spleen, thymus as well as the lymphatic tissue found in the small intestine (Peyer’s patches) and throat (adenoid tonsils, palatine and tubal tonsils), to name a few, all represent lymphatic organs. Hence, rather than representing a single organ, the lymphatic system comprises a circulatory network of vessels and lymphoid tissue and cells in every part of the body. It works together closely with the blood-producing (haematopoietic) system in the bone marrow, thereby playing a vital role in immune responses to protect the body from various pathogens. Also, the lymphatic vessel network helps transporting nutrients and waste products in the body. Lymph and lymph vessels The lymphatic system with its vessel network is – apart from the circulatory system, with which it is closely connected – the most important transport system in the human body. The human body produces about two litres of lymph every day. This clear to yellow-tinted fluid is formed when blood plasma exits the capillary blood vessels and fillls the small spaces (interstices) between and around body tissues and cells before being collected through small lymphatic vessels (lymph capillaries). Lymph transports nutrients and oxygen for the cells as well as immune cells (such as lymphocytes). While circulating through the interstitial spaces of various tissues, lymph also picks up many of the body’s waste products and carbon dioxide. Apart from that, lymph transports fat from the intestines to the blood. After having been collected by the lymph capillaries, lymph is transported through larger lymphatic vessels to the lymph nodes, where lymphocytes purge it before it is emptied into the large (subclavian) veins close to the heart, where it blends again with the blood.
9 Jun 2017
22
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25:02
Bacterial diseases include any type of illness caused by bacteria. Bacteria are a type of microorganism, which are tiny forms of life that can only be seen with a microscope. Other types of microorganisms include viruses, some fungi, and some parasites. Millions of bacteria normally live on the skin, in the intestines, and on the genitalia. The vast majority of bacteria do not cause disease, and many bacteria are actually helpful and even necessary for good health. These bacteria are sometimes referred to as “good bacteria” or “healthy bacteria.” Harmful bacteria that cause bacterial infections and disease are called pathogenic bacteria. Bacterial diseases occur when pathogenic bacteria get into the body and begin to reproduce and crowd out healthy bacteria, or to grow in tissues that are normally sterile. Harmful bacteria may also emit toxins that damage the body. Common pathogenic bacteria and the types of bacterial diseases they cause include: Escherichia coli and Salmonella cause food poisoning. Helicobacter pylori cause gastritis and ulcers. Neisseria gonorrhoeae causes the sexually transmitted disease gonorrhea. Neisseria meningitidis causes meningitis. Staphylococcus aureus causes a variety of infections in the body, including boils, cellulitis, abscesses, wound infections, toxic shock syndrome, pneumonia, and food poisoning. Streptococcal bacteria cause a variety of infections in the body, including pneumonia, meningitis, ear infections, and strep throat. Bacterial diseases are contagious and can result in many serious or life-threatening complications, such as blood poisoning (bacteremia), kidney failure, and toxic shock syndrome.
9 Jun 2017
29
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21:21
Cancer is the second leading cause of death in the United States; it accounts for 1 in 4 deaths in the US and claims more than 1,500 lives a day. There are over 100 different types of cancer and there are many different factors that affect the susceptibility to cancer such as family history, occupation, living conditions, and socioeconomic status. Cancer is a broad term that refers to a range of complex diseases affecting various organs in the human body. Some of the most frequently diagnosed cancers include lung, breast, prostate, and brain cancer. Lung cancer leads to the most number of deaths in both men and women, accounting for about 30% of all cancer deaths. Breast cancer is the second leading cause of cancer death in women, after lung cancer; it is also the second most frequently diagnosed cancer in women, after skin cancers. In the US, breast cancer results in the highest mortality rates of any cancer in women between the ages of 20 and 59. Prostate cancer is the most frequently diagnosed cancer in men, killing 40,000 each year. Brain cancer is the leading cause of cancer death in children under the age of 20 and the third leading cause of death in young adults ages 20-39. In addition to the pain and suffering caused by the disease, cancer places an enormous economic burden on our society. In 2010, cancer was estimated by the National Institutes of Health to cost $102.8 billion in medical costs, $20.9 billion in loss of productivity due to illness, and $140.1 billion in loss of productivity due to premature death, for a grand total of $263.8 billion.
8 Jun 2017
17
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21:21
The toxicity of a chemical refers to its ability to damage an organ system (kidneys, liver), disrupt a biochemical process (e.g., the blood-forming process) or disturb an enzyme system at some site remote from the site of contact. Toxicity is a property of each chemical that is determined by molecular structure. Any substance can be harmful to living things. But, just as there are degrees of being harmful, there are also degrees of being safe. The biological effects (beneficial, indifferent or toxic) of all chemicals are dependent on a number of factors. For every chemical, there are conditions in which it can cause harm and, conversely, for every chemical, there are conditions in which it does not. A complex relationship exists between a biologically active chemical and the effect it produces that involves consideration of dose (the amount of a substance to which one is exposed), time (how often, and for how long during a specific time, the exposure occurs), the route of exposure (inhalation, ingestion, absorption through skin or eyes), and many other factors such as gender, reproductive status, age, general health and nutrition, lifestyle factors, previous sensitization, genetic disposition, and exposure to other chemicals. The most important factor is the dose-time relationship. The dose-time relationship forms the basis for distinguishing between two types of toxicity: acute toxicity and chronic toxicity. The acute toxicity of a chemical refers to its ability to inflict systemic damage as a result (in most cases) of a one-time exposure to relative large amounts of the chemical. In most cases, the exposure is sudden and results in an emergency situation. Chronic toxicity refers to a chemical's ability to inflict systemic damage as a result of repeated exposures, over a prolonged time period, to relatively low levels of the chemical.
7 Jun 2017
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2:04
Catwoman Black Canary
5 Jun 2017
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3:06
Burbank accountant Frank Bigelow goes to San Diego for fun prior to settling down with fiancée Paula. After a night on the town, he wakes up with more than just a hangover; doctors tell him he's been poisoned with no antidote and has about a week to live! Not knowing who did it, he investigates. Starring Medicated Pete (Peter McHeffey) from The Howard Stern Show as an office worker Breaking Bad. Howard Stern: "I'm going to Theatre to see it. Couldn't we get exclusivity for this?" Rated R Starring in random order: Peter McHeffey ... Frank Bigelow Dan Martino ... Captain Johnson Kelly Marcus ... Officer Bart (as Marcus Kelly) Viktoria Khartchenko ... Stephany Gary Matthew ... Haskell Greg Williams ... Officer Cruise Lane Townsend ... Harry Annalisa Guidone ... Mona Gil Gex ... Twick Carl Gambino ... Majac Angela Duffy ... Marla Rakubian Galluzzi Nelson Estevez ... Faraday Samantha Lynn Chase ... Sue Kelsey Caesar ... Grotto Host Stan Jerry G. Angelo ... Santos Edie J. Adler ... Miss Foster Kodi Saint Angelo ... Tina Joseph Daniels ... Detective Hendy Evangelos Themelis ... Besame Singer Eric Sweeney ... Angelo Nick Dorca ... Photographer Stewart David Hill ... Officer Dale Andy Skauge ... Grotto Party Model Shanequa Reed ... Fabela Victoria Ortiz ... Suzie Mycole Metcalf ... Kaylie TJ McNeill ... Stanley Matt Abel ... Mobster Jake Brando Abro ... Mobster Charlie (as Zaid Abro) a Film by Hollywood Director George Anton Studio/Creator: ANTFLIX NOW STREAMING
30 May 2017
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5:49
Testing the new ARB Lockers. (FINAL CUT) 4K HD.mp4
23 May 2017
38
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2:34
Leep Jeep doing the Entrance To Hell's Revenge, Moab Utah. Leep Jeep haciendo la entrada a Hell's Revenge, Moab Utah.
21 May 2017
29
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3:38
Leep Jeep doing Snoopy Rock at Rio Puerco, New Mexico. Never been here? Come on down, we'll be happy to show you around.
2 May 2017
39
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5:32
Leep Jeep doing Snoopy Rock at Rio Puerco, New Mexico. Never been here? Come on down, we'll be happy to show you around.
2 May 2017
58
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