Results for: poison Search Results
Family Filter:
21:21
For centuries, lead toxicity has been one of the most significant preventable causes of neurologic morbidity from an environmental toxin. A heavy metal, lead is ubiquitous in our environment but has no physiologic role in biological systems. Lead toxicity is a particularly insidious hazard with the potential of causing irreversible health effects. It interferes with a number of body functions primarily affecting the central nervous, hematopoietic, hepatic and renal system producing serious disorders. Acute toxicity is related to occupational exposure and is quite uncommon. Chronic toxicity on the other hand is much more common. Research on the effects of lead on adults has prompted the suggestion that acceptable levels of lead in adults be dropped almost to those of children. The ongoing emphasis on abatement of lead environments places added emphasis on occupational exposure to lead (eg, among workers at smelters or battery recycling plants). Such exposure is a continuing problem. Whereas occupational exposure remains an occasional concern, the greatest public health issue related to lead at present is exposure of young children to decaying fragments of leaded paint. Pediatric lead poisoning Compared with adult lead poisoning, pediatric lead poisoning is a somewhat newer problem. First reported in the late 1800s in Australia, interest in childhood lead poisoning and its manifold clinical presentations has burgeoned. It should be noted that toxic metals, including lead, can be transmitted from a mother to her child via breast milk. Lead poisoning is probably the most important chronic environmental illness affecting modern children. Despite efforts to control it and despite apparent success in decreasing incidence, serious cases of lead poisoning still appear in hospital emergency departments (EDs), clinics, and private physicians’ offices.
21 Aug 2017
0
Share Video

21:20
The first step of treatment is to locate and remove the source of the lead. Keep children away from the source. If it cannot be removed, it should be sealed. Call your local health department for information on how to remove lead. They can also help you reduce the likelihood of lead exposure. In more severe cases, a procedure known as chelation therapy can be used. This treatment binds to lead that has accumulated in your body. The lead is then excreted in your urine. Activated charcoal can be used to bind the lead in the gastrointestinal tract and encourage elimination via defecation. A chemical called EDTA may also be used Even with treatment, it can be hard to reverse the effects of chronic exposure. The first step in treating lead poisoning is to remove the source of the contamination. If you can't remove lead from your environment, you might be able to reduce the likelihood that it will cause problems. For instance, sometimes it's better to seal in rather than remove old lead paint. Your local health department can recommend ways to identify and reduce lead in your home and community. For children and adults with relatively low lead levels, simply avoiding exposure to lead might be enough to reduce blood lead levels.
17 Aug 2017
2
Share Video

21:20
Lead poisoning is diagnosed with a blood lead test. This test is performed on a standard blood sample. Lead is common in the environment. The National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences reports that no amount of lead in the blood is safe. It is known that levels as low as 5 micrograms per deciliter can be associated with health problems in children. Additional tests could include blood tests to look at the amount of iron storing cells in the blood, X-rays, and possibly a bone marrow biopsy. Your child's doctor may recommend your child be tested for lead levels during routine check-ups. The American Academy of Pediatricians recommends that doctors and parents follow the recommendations of their state or local health department. Some areas, such as those with older homes, have a higher lead exposure risk, so more frequent testing might be recommended for children who live in those areas. If your area doesn't have specific lead testing recommendations, the American Academy of Pediatrics recommends your child be tested for lead levels at ages 1 and 2. Doctors might also suggest lead screening for older children who haven't been tested. A simple blood test can detect lead poisoning. A small blood sample is taken from a finger prick or from a vein. Lead levels in the blood are measured in micrograms per deciliter (mcg/dL). There is no safe blood level of lead. However, a level of 5 mcg/dL is used to indicate a possibly unsafe level for children. Children whose blood tests at those levels should be tested periodically. A child whose levels become too high — generally 45 mcg/dL or higher — should be treated.
15 Aug 2017
14
Share Video

21:21
Lead is a toxic metal that occurs naturally in the Earth’s crust, but its use in activities such as mining, smelting and the burning of fossil fuels has contaminated the environment, leading to human exposure and public health problems in various parts of the world. Lead is also a key component in paint, pigments, gasoline, ammunition, batteries, stained glass, solder, roofing materials and some cosmetics and medicines. Lead poisoning refers to when lead accumulates in the body and causes severe health problems. The accumulating lead is distributed to and stored in the brain, kidneys, liver, bones and teeth. Even very small amounts can lead to problems and at very high amounts, it can cause death. Lead exposure is determined by measuring the amount of lead in the blood and no known level of lead exposure is regarded as safe. Children under 6 years of age are particularly vulnerable to the toxic effects of lead poisoning, which causes profound and permanent problems, particularly ones that affect brain development and the nervous system. Children of this age are particularly vulnerable to lead poisoning because they absorb up to five times more lead when exposed than adults do. Hand-to-mouth behaviors among this age group also increase the risk of objects containing or coated in lead being swallowed. In adults, lead poisoning can also lead to long-term health issues, including hypertension and kidney damage. During pregnancy, lead is released from bone into the blood, which is a source of exposure to the fetus. Pregnant woman who are exposed to high lead levels are at an increased risk of miscarriage, stillbirth and premature birth. Lead poisoning occurs when lead is ingested. Breathing in dust that contains lead can also cause it. You cannot smell or taste lead and it’s not visible to the naked eye. In the United States, lead used to be common in house paint and gasoline. These products are not produced with lead any longer. However, lead is still present every
13 Aug 2017
22
Share Video

25:02
Bacterial infections are one cause of foodborne illness. Nausea, vomiting, diarrhea, fever, chills, and abdominal pain are common symptoms of food poisoning. Raw meat, fish, eggs, poultry, and unpasteurized dairy may harbor harmful bacteria that can cause illness. Unsanitary food preparation and handling can also encourage bacterial growth. Bacteria that cause food poisoning include: Campylobacter jejuni (C. jejuni) is a diarrheal illness often accompanied by cramps and fever. Clostridium botulinum (C. botulinum) is a potentially life-threatening bacterium that produces powerful neurotoxins. Escherichia coli (E. coli) O157:H7 is a diarrheal (often bloody) illness that may be accompanied by nausea, vomiting, fever, and abdominal cramps. Listeria monocytogenes (L. monocytogenes) causes fever, muscle aches, and diarrhea. Pregnant women, elderly individuals, infants, and those with weakened immune systems are most at risk for acquiring this infection. Salmonella causes fever, diarrhea, and abdominal cramps. Symptoms typically last between 4 and 7 days. Vibrio causes diarrhea when ingested, but it can also cause severe skin infections when it comes in contact with an open wound.
13 Aug 2017
29
Share Video

21:20
Symptoms of lead poisoning are varied. They may affect many parts of the body. Most of the time, lead poisoning builds up slowly. It follows repeated exposures to small quantities of lead. Lead toxicity is rare after a single exposure or ingestion of lead. Signs of repeated lead exposure include: abdominal pain abdominal cramps aggressive behavior constipation sleep problems headaches irritability loss of developmental skills in children loss of appetite fatigue high blood pressure numbness or tingling in the extremities memory loss anemia kidney dysfunction Since a child’s brain is still developing, lead can lead to intellectual disability. Symptoms may include: behavior problems low IQ poor grades at school problems with hearing short- and long-term learning difficulties growth delays
12 Aug 2017
14
Share Video

21:20
Lead is a highly toxic metal and a very strong poison. Lead poisoning is a serious and sometimes fatal condition. It occurs when lead builds up in the body. Lead is found in lead-based paints, including paint on the walls of old houses and toys. It is also found in: art supplies contaminated dust gasoline products sold outside of the United States and Canada Lead poisoning usually occurs over a period of months or years. It can cause severe mental and physical impairment. Young children are most vulnerable. Children get lead in their bodies by putting the lead containing objects in their mouths. Touching the lead and then putting their fingers in their mouths may also poison them. Lead is more harmful to children because their brains and nervous systems are still developing. Lead poisoning can be treated, but any damage caused cannot be reversed.
8 Aug 2017
24
Share Video

25:02
What are Bacteria? Bacteria are microscopic, single-cell organisms that live almost everywhere. Bacteria live in every climate and location on earth. Some are airborne while others live in water or soil. Bacteria live on and inside plants, animals, and people. The word "bacteria" has a negative connotation, but bacteria actually perform many vital functions for organisms and in the environment. For example, plants need bacteria in the soil in order to grow. The vast majority of bacteria are harmless to people and some strains are even beneficial. In the human gastrointestinal tract, good bacteria aid in digestion and produce vitamins. They also help with immunity, making the body less hospitable to bad bacteria and other harmful pathogens. When considering all the strains of bacteria that exist, relatively few are capable of making people sick. What Is a Bacterial Infection? A bacterial infection is a proliferation of a harmful strain of bacteria on or inside the body. Bacteria can infect any area of the body. Pneumonia, meningitis, and food poisoning are just a few illnesses that may be caused by harmful bacteria. Bacteria come in three basic shapes: rod-shaped (bacilli), spherical (cocci), or helical (spirilla). Bacteria may also be classified as gram-positive or gram-negative. Gram-positive bacteria have a thick cell wall while gram-negative bacteria do not. Gram staining, bacterial culture with antibiotic sensitivity determination, and other tests are used to identify bacterial strains and help determine the appropriate course of treatment.
8 Aug 2017
21
Share Video

21:21
These are especially hazardous household items. Buy small quantities. Discard unneeded extras. Make sure they are always out of a child's reach. Medicines: these are OK in the right amount for the right person. They can be dangerous for children who take the wrong medicine or swallow too much. Carbon monoxide: This gas is in fact an invisible killer. Take it seriously. Make sure there's a carbon monoxide alarm in every sleeping area of your home. Button batteries: Be especially mindful of the 20 mm lithium coin cell. When swallowed by children, especially those younger than 4 years, it often lodges in the esophagus causing burns within just 2 hours. A hole in the esophagus may develop and the burn can extend into the trachea or aorta. More than 40 children have died from swallowing button batteries. Iron pills: adult-strength iron pills are very dangerous for children to swallow. Children can start throwing up blood or having bloody diarrhea in less than an hour. Cleaning products that cause chemical burns: these can be just as bad as burns from fire. Products that cause chemical burns include include drain openers, toilet bowl cleaners, rust removers, and oven cleaners. Nail glue remover and nail primer: some products used for artificial nails can be poisonous in surprising ways. Some nail glue removers have caused cyanide poisoning when swallowed by children. Some nail primers have caused burns to the skin and mouth of children who tried to drink them. Hydrocarbons: this is a broad category that includes gasoline, kerosene, lamp oil, motor oil, lighter fluid, furniture polish, and paint thinner. These liquids are easy to choke on if someone tries to swallow them. If that happens, they can go down the wrong way, into the lungs instead of the stomach. If they get into someone’s lungs, they make it hard to breathe. They can also cause lung inflammation (like pneumonia). Hydrocarbons are among the leading causes of poisoning death in children.
7 Aug 2017
28
Share Video

25:03
These are especially hazardous household items. Buy small quantities. Discard unneeded extras. Make sure they are always out of a child's reach. Medicines: these are OK in the right amount for the right person. They can be dangerous for children who take the wrong medicine or swallow too much. Carbon monoxide: This gas is in fact an invisible killer. Take it seriously. Make sure there's a carbon monoxide alarm in every sleeping area of your home. Button batteries: Be especially mindful of the 20 mm lithium coin cell. When swallowed by children, especially those younger than 4 years, it often lodges in the esophagus causing burns within just 2 hours. A hole in the esophagus may develop and the burn can extend into the trachea or aorta. More than 40 children have died from swallowing button batteries. Iron pills: adult-strength iron pills are very dangerous for children to swallow. Children can start throwing up blood or having bloody diarrhea in less than an hour. Cleaning products that cause chemical burns: these can be just as bad as burns from fire. Products that cause chemical burns include include drain openers, toilet bowl cleaners, rust removers, and oven cleaners. Nail glue remover and nail primer: some products used for artificial nails can be poisonous in surprising ways. Some nail glue removers have caused cyanide poisoning when swallowed by children. Some nail primers have caused burns to the skin and mouth of children who tried to drink them. Hydrocarbons: this is a broad category that includes gasoline, kerosene, lamp oil, motor oil, lighter fluid, furniture polish, and paint thinner. These liquids are easy to choke on if someone tries to swallow them. If that happens, they can go down the wrong way, into the lungs instead of the stomach. If they get into someone’s lungs, they make it hard to breathe. They can also cause lung inflammation (like pneumonia). Hydrocarbons are among the leading causes of poisoning death in children.
7 Aug 2017
24
Share Video

2:35
We discuss on latest legal issues and shares the latest news. we also share views on related topics of experts. For More info:- IndiaLegalLive
5 Aug 2017
11
Share Video

21:21
Heavy metal toxicity can cause a variety of signs and symptoms. While manifestations of toxicity vary among the many toxic metals, several symptoms are often observed and may be indicative of heavy metal toxicity (Adal 2013): Nausea Vomiting Diarrhea Abdominal pain Central nervous system dysfunction Heart problems Anemia Fingernail or toenail discoloration (Mee’s lines; usually appearing as white stripes running horizontally across the nails) Acute metal toxicity can be a life-threatening medical emergency that may require aggressive treatment in a hospital setting. If you suspect you have been exposed to a toxic metal, seek medical attention immediately. Diagnosis Diagnosing metal toxicities can be difficult; the symptoms and consequences of many, especially chronic toxicities, are non-specific and may resemble other diseases. A careful analysis of dietary, environmental, and occupational exposure history is one of the most important tools in evaluating a potential metal toxicity (Vearrier 2010). Metal testing can be an important aid to confirm or rule out a diagnosis of metal toxicity. Some metal tests include: Blood testing. Commercial blood tests are available for many metals (universally toxic metals, such as lead and mercury, as well as essential metals that are toxic above certain thresholds, such as iron or copper). Blood levels of cadmium and lead are usually indicative of recent exposures and may not reflect whole body burdens (ATSDR 2007b; ATSDR 2012b). For example, in the case of lead, blood levels are only indicative of exposure over the previous 90 days (ATSDR 2007b). In the case of arsenic, which is cleared rapidly from the blood, blood tests may only be reliable during early stages of intoxication (< 7-10 days after exposure) (Rusyniak 2010). There is a poor correlation between blood levels and exposure for aluminum (ATSDR 2008b). Reference ranges for individual tests depend on the laboratory performing the analysis.
5 Aug 2017
13
Share Video