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21:20
Lead is a cumulative toxicant that affects multiple body systems and is particularly harmful to young children. Lead in the body is distributed to the brain, liver, kidney and bones. It is stored in the teeth and bones, where it accumulates over time. Human exposure is usually assessed through the measurement of lead in blood. Lead in bone is released into blood during pregnancy and becomes a source of exposure to the developing fetus. There is no known level of lead exposure that is considered safe. Lead poisoning is entirely preventable. Lead is a naturally occurring toxic metal found in the Earth’s crust. Its widespread use has resulted in extensive environmental contamination, human exposure and significant public health problems in many parts of the world. Important sources of environmental contamination include mining, smelting, manufacturing and recycling activities, and, in some countries, the continued use of leaded paint, leaded gasoline, and leaded aviation fuel. More than three quarters of global lead consumption is for the manufacture of lead-acid batteries for motor vehicles. Lead is, however, also used in many other products, for example pigments, paints, solder, stained glass, lead crystal glassware, ammunition, ceramic glazes, jewellery, toys and in some cosmetics and traditional medicines. Drinking water delivered through lead pipes or pipes joined with lead solder may contain lead. Much of the lead in global commerce is now obtained from recycling. Young children are particularly vulnerable to the toxic effects of lead and can suffer profound and permanent adverse health effects, particularly affecting the development of the brain and nervous system. Lead also causes long-term harm in adults, including increased risk of high blood pressure and kidney damage. Exposure of pregnant women to high levels of lead can cause miscarriage, stillbirth, premature birth and low birth weight, as well as minor malformations.
26 Jun 2017
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21:20
You can protect your kids from lead poisoning by ensuring that your home is lead-free — ask your local health department about having your home evaluated for lead sources. And have your kids tested for lead exposure, particularly if when they're between 6 months and 3 years old. Kids this age spend a lot of time on the floor and try to put things in their mouths. These tips can help you reduce the risk of lead exposure: Be wary of old plumbing. Old plumbing might be lined with lead. If you have an old plumbing system (in homes built before 1970), which used copper pipes and lead solder, you may want to get your water tested. You can call your local health department or water department to find a laboratory that will test your water for lead content. You also can take precautions to limit your exposure. If the water from the cold faucet has not been run for several hours, let cold water run for 30 seconds before drinking it. And because hot water absorbs more lead than cold water, don't use hot tap water for meals. Keep your home and your family clean. Wash your kids' hands and toys often, and keep dusty surfaces clean with a wet cloth. Ensure that iron and calcium are in your diets. If kids are exposed to lead, good nutrition can reduce the amount that's absorbed by their bodies. Eating regular meals is helpful because lead is absorbed more during periods of fasting. Know where your kids play. Keep them away from busy roads and the underside of bridges. If you suspect that you might have lead-based paint on your walls, use a wet cloth to wipe windowsills and walls. Watch out for water damage that can make paint peel. Don't sand or heat lead-based paint because doing so increases the risk that lead will be inhaled. If the paint doesn't have many chips, a new layer of paint, paneling, or drywall will probably reduce the risk. It's best to consult a professional, especially because other precautions might be needed to contain the lead in the paint.
3 Jul 2017
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0:13
GameHawk - Comic-Con 2014 - Emily & Poison Ivy Drop
14 Jul 2017
174
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21:21
These are especially hazardous household items. Buy small quantities. Discard unneeded extras. Make sure they are always out of a child's reach. Medicines: these are OK in the right amount for the right person. They can be dangerous for children who take the wrong medicine or swallow too much. Carbon monoxide: This gas is in fact an invisible killer. Take it seriously. Make sure there's a carbon monoxide alarm in every sleeping area of your home. Button batteries: Be especially mindful of the 20 mm lithium coin cell. When swallowed by children, especially those younger than 4 years, it often lodges in the esophagus causing burns within just 2 hours. A hole in the esophagus may develop and the burn can extend into the trachea or aorta. More than 40 children have died from swallowing button batteries. Iron pills: adult-strength iron pills are very dangerous for children to swallow. Children can start throwing up blood or having bloody diarrhea in less than an hour. Cleaning products that cause chemical burns: these can be just as bad as burns from fire. Products that cause chemical burns include include drain openers, toilet bowl cleaners, rust removers, and oven cleaners. Nail glue remover and nail primer: some products used for artificial nails can be poisonous in surprising ways. Some nail glue removers have caused cyanide poisoning when swallowed by children. Some nail primers have caused burns to the skin and mouth of children who tried to drink them. Hydrocarbons: this is a broad category that includes gasoline, kerosene, lamp oil, motor oil, lighter fluid, furniture polish, and paint thinner. These liquids are easy to choke on if someone tries to swallow them. If that happens, they can go down the wrong way, into the lungs instead of the stomach. If they get into someone’s lungs, they make it hard to breathe. They can also cause lung inflammation (like pneumonia). Hydrocarbons are among the leading causes of poisoning death in children.
7 Aug 2017
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21:20
Lead is a highly toxic metal and a very strong poison. Lead poisoning is a serious and sometimes fatal condition. It occurs when lead builds up in the body. Lead is found in lead-based paints, including paint on the walls of old houses and toys. It is also found in: art supplies contaminated dust gasoline products sold outside of the United States and Canada Lead poisoning usually occurs over a period of months or years. It can cause severe mental and physical impairment. Young children are most vulnerable. Children get lead in their bodies by putting the lead containing objects in their mouths. Touching the lead and then putting their fingers in their mouths may also poison them. Lead is more harmful to children because their brains and nervous systems are still developing. Lead poisoning can be treated, but any damage caused cannot be reversed.
8 Aug 2017
55
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21:20
Symptoms of lead poisoning are varied. They may affect many parts of the body. Most of the time, lead poisoning builds up slowly. It follows repeated exposures to small quantities of lead. Lead toxicity is rare after a single exposure or ingestion of lead. Signs of repeated lead exposure include: abdominal pain abdominal cramps aggressive behavior constipation sleep problems headaches irritability loss of developmental skills in children loss of appetite fatigue high blood pressure numbness or tingling in the extremities memory loss anemia kidney dysfunction Since a child’s brain is still developing, lead can lead to intellectual disability. Symptoms may include: behavior problems low IQ poor grades at school problems with hearing short- and long-term learning difficulties growth delays
12 Aug 2017
56
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21:21
Lead is a toxic metal that occurs naturally in the Earth’s crust, but its use in activities such as mining, smelting and the burning of fossil fuels has contaminated the environment, leading to human exposure and public health problems in various parts of the world. Lead is also a key component in paint, pigments, gasoline, ammunition, batteries, stained glass, solder, roofing materials and some cosmetics and medicines. Lead poisoning refers to when lead accumulates in the body and causes severe health problems. The accumulating lead is distributed to and stored in the brain, kidneys, liver, bones and teeth. Even very small amounts can lead to problems and at very high amounts, it can cause death. Lead exposure is determined by measuring the amount of lead in the blood and no known level of lead exposure is regarded as safe. Children under 6 years of age are particularly vulnerable to the toxic effects of lead poisoning, which causes profound and permanent problems, particularly ones that affect brain development and the nervous system. Children of this age are particularly vulnerable to lead poisoning because they absorb up to five times more lead when exposed than adults do. Hand-to-mouth behaviors among this age group also increase the risk of objects containing or coated in lead being swallowed. In adults, lead poisoning can also lead to long-term health issues, including hypertension and kidney damage. During pregnancy, lead is released from bone into the blood, which is a source of exposure to the fetus. Pregnant woman who are exposed to high lead levels are at an increased risk of miscarriage, stillbirth and premature birth. Lead poisoning occurs when lead is ingested. Breathing in dust that contains lead can also cause it. You cannot smell or taste lead and it’s not visible to the naked eye. In the United States, lead used to be common in house paint and gasoline. These products are not produced with lead any longer. However, lead is still present every
13 Aug 2017
54
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21:20
Lead poisoning is diagnosed with a blood lead test. This test is performed on a standard blood sample. Lead is common in the environment. The National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences reports that no amount of lead in the blood is safe. It is known that levels as low as 5 micrograms per deciliter can be associated with health problems in children. Additional tests could include blood tests to look at the amount of iron storing cells in the blood, X-rays, and possibly a bone marrow biopsy. Your child's doctor may recommend your child be tested for lead levels during routine check-ups. The American Academy of Pediatricians recommends that doctors and parents follow the recommendations of their state or local health department. Some areas, such as those with older homes, have a higher lead exposure risk, so more frequent testing might be recommended for children who live in those areas. If your area doesn't have specific lead testing recommendations, the American Academy of Pediatrics recommends your child be tested for lead levels at ages 1 and 2. Doctors might also suggest lead screening for older children who haven't been tested. A simple blood test can detect lead poisoning. A small blood sample is taken from a finger prick or from a vein. Lead levels in the blood are measured in micrograms per deciliter (mcg/dL). There is no safe blood level of lead. However, a level of 5 mcg/dL is used to indicate a possibly unsafe level for children. Children whose blood tests at those levels should be tested periodically. A child whose levels become too high — generally 45 mcg/dL or higher — should be treated.
15 Aug 2017
38
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21:20
The first step of treatment is to locate and remove the source of the lead. Keep children away from the source. If it cannot be removed, it should be sealed. Call your local health department for information on how to remove lead. They can also help you reduce the likelihood of lead exposure. In more severe cases, a procedure known as chelation therapy can be used. This treatment binds to lead that has accumulated in your body. The lead is then excreted in your urine. Activated charcoal can be used to bind the lead in the gastrointestinal tract and encourage elimination via defecation. A chemical called EDTA may also be used Even with treatment, it can be hard to reverse the effects of chronic exposure. The first step in treating lead poisoning is to remove the source of the contamination. If you can't remove lead from your environment, you might be able to reduce the likelihood that it will cause problems. For instance, sometimes it's better to seal in rather than remove old lead paint. Your local health department can recommend ways to identify and reduce lead in your home and community. For children and adults with relatively low lead levels, simply avoiding exposure to lead might be enough to reduce blood lead levels.
17 Aug 2017
41
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21:21
The first step of treatment is to locate and remove the source of the lead. Keep children away from the source. If it cannot be removed, it should be sealed. Call your local health department for information on how to remove lead. They can also help you reduce the likelihood of lead exposure. In more severe cases, a procedure known as chelation therapy can be used. This treatment binds to lead that has accumulated in your body. The lead is then excreted in your urine. Activated charcoal can be used to bind the lead in the gastrointestinal tract and encourage elimination via defecation. A chemical called EDTA may also be used Even with treatment, it can be hard to reverse the effects of chronic exposure. What is the outlook for lead poisoning? Adults with moderate exposure usually recover without any complications. In children, recovery can take time. Even low lead exposure can cause permanent intellectual disability. How can lead poisoning be prevented? Simple steps can help you prevent lead poisoning. These include: Avoid or throw away painted toys and canned goods from foreign countries. Keep your home free from dust. Use only cold water to prepare foods and drinks. Make sure everyone washes their hands before eating. Test your water for lead. If lead levels are high, use a filtering device or drink bottled water. Clean faucets and aerators regularly. Wash children’s toys and bottles regularly. Teach your children to wash their hands after playing. Make sure any contractor doing work in your house is certified in lead control. Use lead-free paint in your home. Take young children for blood lead level screening at their pediatrician’s office. This is usually done around 1 to 2 years of age. Avoid areas where lead-based paint may have been used.
7 Sep 2017
42
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22:30
This is my first full gameplay of the hidden object game Paranormal State Poison Spring made by a Polish developer, Teyon.
8 Sep 2017
93
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21:21
These are especially hazardous household items. Buy small quantities. Discard unneeded extras. Make sure they are always out of a child's reach. Medicines: these are OK in the right amount for the right person. They can be dangerous for children who take the wrong medicine or swallow too much. Carbon monoxide: This gas is in fact an invisible killer. Take it seriously. Make sure there's a carbon monoxide alarm in every sleeping area of your home. Button batteries: Be especially mindful of the 20 mm lithium coin cell. When swallowed by children, especially those younger than 4 years, it often lodges in the esophagus causing burns within just 2 hours. A hole in the esophagus may develop and the burn can extend into the trachea or aorta. More than 40 children have died from swallowing button batteries. Iron pills: adult-strength iron pills are very dangerous for children to swallow. Children can start throwing up blood or having bloody diarrhea in less than an hour. Cleaning products that cause chemical burns: these can be just as bad as burns from fire. Products that cause chemical burns include include drain openers, toilet bowl cleaners, rust removers, and oven cleaners. Nail glue remover and nail primer: some products used for artificial nails can be poisonous in surprising ways. Some nail glue removers have caused cyanide poisoning when swallowed by children. Some nail primers have caused burns to the skin and mouth of children who tried to drink them. Hydrocarbons: this is a broad category that includes gasoline, kerosene, lamp oil, motor oil, lighter fluid, furniture polish, and paint thinner. These liquids are easy to choke on if someone tries to swallow them. If that happens, they can go down the wrong way, into the lungs instead of the stomach. If they get into someone’s lungs, they make it hard to breathe. They can also cause lung inflammation (like pneumonia). Hydrocarbons are among the leading causes of poisoning death in children.
12 Sep 2017
89
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