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6:47
Top 10 Dangerous Railway Bridges in the World
24 Jan 2018
43
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0:25
Now Online Transport of railway bridge over water, and lifting of the bridge. Zuidhorn The Netherlands Full report see specialtv[.]info For more reports please subscribe SpecialTV channel
5 Feb 2018
16
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2:33
For Accident site in railway.
2 Feb 2018
17
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1:00
Check PNR Status of Indian Railways Booking Status in our website. You can also check Train Running Status online which is the fastest way to observe your train in real time. Also check updates of PNR anywhere anytime at any place.
3 Feb 2018
12
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5:46
Salarpuria Park Cubix, a number one realty developer in Bangalore, pre-launching residential project at Salarpuria Park Cubix Devanahalli with world category amenities and construction quality. This perhaps the best investment as a home for the longer term with the most effective ever property owing to the forthcoming railway property across East, West, North and South of Bangalore.
10 Feb 2018
59
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0:32
Man commits suicide. Run over by railway engine.
1 Mar 2007
22464
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0:43
Penang Hill's famous funnicular railway
30 Jun 2007
1064
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8:33
Know all about India Railway Budget- 2008, Railway minister Lalu Prasad Yadav and his news policies and fares, reduction in fares and special plans for women, students, handicapped and other india news.
28 Feb 2008
1204
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4:36
My model railway set in action. the electricity is transmitted through the rails, and up to two trains are controllable. (they go forward at any speed you want, they go backward any speed you want) by Corey J Smith
29 Mar 2008
632
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4:12
In necklace road railway station with my Friends
23 May 2008
447
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1:23
My second full day in London (May 11, 2008) started off with gorgeous sunshine. Andrea and I enjoyed a fabulous breakfast at the Zetter Hotel, a cool boutique type hotel in London’s Clerkenwell area. Then we decided to make our way to the Liverpool Street Station to hop onto the No. 11 bus that would take us past all sorts of important sights to the historic Victoria Railway Station – a great, inexpensive way to view some of London’s main attractions. We then walked toward Buckingham Palace and got caught in the crowds awaiting the famous Changing of the Guards Ritual. After the ceremonial parade had passed by, we strolled beside beautiful St. James’s Park to Trafalgar Square. From here we made our way past the Horse Guards and Downing Street (the British Prime Minister’s residence) to the Houses of Parliament where we arrived just minutes before Big Ben proudly rang out noon. From the bridge we had a perfect view of the the Parliament Buildings and the London Eye, London’s famous giant ferris wheel. Shortly after 1 pm we took a sightseeing boat from Westminster Pier to Greenwich, and enjoyed the guide’s humorous narration as he explained various sights along the riverbanks of the Thames, including Tower Bridge, one of London’s most recognized landmarks. Upon our arrival in Greenwich we had to race to the Docklands Railway to make our way to Whitechapel where we were going to link up with a tour called “The Unknown East End of London”. Harry Jackson, our certified Blue Badge tour guide filled us in about the colourful history of this area, traditionally home to successive waves of immigrant labourers who, among others, included French Huguenots, Ashkenazi Jews and more recently, Bengali immigrants. Jack the Ripper of course terrorized this area in the late 1800s and was included in the stories. On Brick Lane we happened across a street festival and ended our tour at Christ Church, Spitalfields. After a short walk we arrived at Liverpool Street Station and took the tube back to our hotel (the Zetter) where we got a brief private tour of some of the unique suites of this boutique hotel. In the late afternoon we relocated to a bed and breakfast in the Holland Park area and after settling in, we headed out to Snaresbrook to join Andrea’s friends for a tasty Indian takeout dinner. Another packed day in London!
27 Jun 2008
329
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4:01
My second full day in London (May 11, 2008) started off with gorgeous sunshine. Andrea and I enjoyed a fabulous breakfast at the Zetter Hotel, a cool boutique type hotel in London’s Clerkenwell area. Then we decided to make our way to the Liverpool Street Station to hop onto the No. 11 bus that would take us past all sorts of important sights to the historic Victoria Railway Station – a great, inexpensive way to view some of London’s main attractions. We then walked toward Buckingham Palace and got caught in the crowds awaiting the famous Changing of the Guards Ritual. After the ceremonial parade had passed by, we strolled beside beautiful St. James’s Park to Trafalgar Square. From here we made our way past the Horse Guards and Downing Street (the British Prime Minister’s residence) to the Houses of Parliament where we arrived just minutes before Big Ben proudly rang out noon. From the bridge we had a perfect view of the the Parliament Buildings and the London Eye, London’s famous giant ferris wheel. Shortly after 1 pm we took a sightseeing boat from Westminster Pier to Greenwich, and enjoyed the guide’s humorous narration as he explained various sights along the riverbanks of the Thames, including Tower Bridge, one of London’s most recognized landmarks. Upon our arrival in Greenwich we had to race to the Docklands Railway to make our way to Whitechapel where we were going to link up with a tour called “The Unknown East End of London”. Harry Jackson, our certified Blue Badge tour guide filled us in about the colourful history of this area, traditionally home to successive waves of immigrant labourers who, among others, included French Huguenots, Ashkenazi Jews and more recently, Bengali immigrants. Jack the Ripper of course terrorized this area in the late 1800s and was included in the stories. On Brick Lane we happened across a street festival and ended our tour at Christ Church, Spitalfields. After a short walk we arrived at Liverpool Street Station and took the tube back to our hotel (the Zetter) where we got a brief private tour of some of the unique suites of this boutique hotel. In the late afternoon we relocated to a bed and breakfast in the Holland Park area and after settling in, we headed out to Snaresbrook to join Andrea’s friends for a tasty Indian takeout dinner. Another packed day in London!
27 Jun 2008
248
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1:01
Laurel Line: An Anthracite Region Railway JAMES N.J. HENWOOD & JOHN G. MUNCIE The dawn of the 20th Century saw a new form of transportation evolve in the United States: the interurban electric railway. These enterprises were natural offshoots of the original, short urban trolley lines that quickly replaced the horse car in the 1890s. Most trolley lines lived in relative obscurity and enjoyed a few years of prosperity, followed by decline and abandonment in the face of bus and automotive competition. A relative handful managed to survive until the post-World War II years and thus have attracted greater attention. Among them was the Lackawanna and Wyoming Valley Railroad. The Laurel Line, as it was most commonly known, was unusual in several respects: It was built to higher-than-normal standards for electric short line railroads; it operated mostly with a third rail power system; it ran exclusively on private rights-of-way; and it served a geographically narrow region whose economy was heavily dependent on one industry - coal. The Laurel Line's corporate records survived, and authors Henwood and Muncie made the most of this historical treasure. In the book, the railroad emerges in human terms of strife, struggle, victory and defeat. The reader learns not only what happened, but why, and who made it happen. All railroads are interesting if properly researched - the Laurel Line as portrayed in this work is profoundly fascinating. Life in Pennsylvania's anthracite region is detailed when the Lackawanna and Wyoming Valley Railroad was fighting the good fight. $39.95 ISBN:0976507234 8.5" x 11", paperback 214 pp 2005 Have a question or a comment for James Henwood or John Muncie? Email them at laurellinetribute-books****
27 Jun 2008
944
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