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*******www.bestcatholicbible****/page/421791592 Douay-Rheims Version is considered by many to be the safest, most traditional and most trustworthy Catholic Bible. Douay-Rheims is free from error in matters of faith and morals.
12 Oct 2012
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18 Jan 2009
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mama's and papa's love...
30 Mar 2009
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*******www.bestcatholicbible****/page/425479612 The Church has always acknowledged literal, word-for-word translation as the way to translate the Bible. Up until the 20th century no other method was even considered. In 2001, under Blessed John Paul II, the Vatican issued an official Instruction, Liturgiam authenticam, which made its desire explicit: no fewer than five times does it call for literal translation of liturgical texts.
12 Oct 2012
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*******www.bestcatholicbible****/page/424655598 It is an English translation of the Latin Vulgate Bible. Catholics looking for the traditional Catholic Bible in English should look no future!
17 Oct 2012
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*******www.bestcatholicbible****/page/425479612 The Church has always acknowledged literal, word-for-word translation as the way to translate the Bible. Up until the 20th century no other method was even considered. In 2001, under Blessed John Paul II, the Vatican issued an official Instruction, Liturgiam authenticam, which made its desire explicit: no fewer than five times does it call for literal translation of liturgical texts.
17 Oct 2012
84
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*******www.globalchange**** Future of online brand development, advertising, marketing and corporate image. How corporate image is being challenged by social networks such as FaceBook, Twitter, LinkedIn, Blogs, YouTube and other online communities. Why trust has fallen in corporate brand messages. How to use social networking and viral marketing to strengthen brands. How online image is affecting investment, recruitment, workplace morale, staff retention and the war for talent. How to make keep your brand in the mind of consumers and customers. Video of Q and A session with CEOs and senior business leaders by Futurist conference keynote speaker: Patrick Dixon at Stan Am Rheim.
15 Apr 2009
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*******www.bestcatholicbible****/ The source for the Catholic Revised Standard Version and Douay-Rheims Version! BestCatholicBible**** has every type of bible you can think of!
12 Oct 2012
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*******www.bestcatholicbible****/ The source for the Catholic Revised Standard Version and Douay-Rheims Version! BestCatholicBible**** has every type of bible you can think of!
17 Oct 2012
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Sirach Chapter 12 We are to be liberal to the just: and not to trust the wicked. English (Douay-Rheims) 1 If thou do good, know to whom thou dost it, and there shall be much thanks for thy good deeds. 2 Do good to the just, and thou shalt find great recompense: and if not of him, assuredly of the Lord. 3 For there is no good for him that is always occupied in evil, and that giveth no alms: for the Highest hateth sinners, and hath mercy on the penitent. 4 Give to the merciful and uphold not the sinner: God will repay vengeance to the ungodly and to sinners, and keep them against the day of vengeance. 5 Give to the good, and receive not a sinner. 6 Do good to the humble, and give not to the ungodly: hold back thy bread, and give it not to him, lest thereby he overmaster thee. 7 For thou shalt receive twice as much evil for all the good thou shalt have done to him: for the Highest also hateth sinners, and will repay vengeance to the ungodly. 8 A friend shall not be known in prosperity, and an enemy shall not be hidden in adversity. 9 In the prosperity of a man, his enemies are grieved: and a friend is known in his adversity. 10 Never trust thy enemy for as a brass pot his wickedness rusteth: 11 Though he humble himself and go crouching, yet take good heed and beware of him. 12 Set him not by thee, neither let him sit on thy right hand, lest he turn into thy place, and seek to take thy seat and at the last thou acknowledge my words, and be pricked with my sayings. 13 Who will pity an enchanter struck by a serpent, or any that come near wild beasts? so is it with him that keepeth company with a wicked man, and is involved in his sins. 14 For an hour he will abide with thee: but if thou begin to decline, he will not endure it. 15 An enemy speaketh sweetly with his lips, but in his heart he lieth in wait, to throw thee into a pit. 16 An enemy weepeth with his eyes: but if he find an opportunity he will not be satisfied with blood: 17 And if evils come upon thee, thou shalt find him there first. 18 An enemy hath tears in his eyes, and while he pretendeth to help thee, will undermine thy feet. 19 He will shake his head, and clap his hands, and whisper much, and change his countenance. Sirach Chapter 13 Cautions in the choice of company. English (Douay-Rheims) 1 He that toucheth pitch, shall be defiled with it: and he that hath fellowship with the proud, shall put on pride. 2 He shall take a burden upon him that hath fellowship with one more honourable than himself. And have no fellowship with one that is richer than thyself. 3 What agreement shall the earthen pot have with the kettle? for if they knock one against the other, it shall be broken. 4 The rich man hath done wrong, and yet he will fume: but the poor is wronged and must hold his peace. 5 If thou give, he will make use of thee: and if thou have nothing, he will forsake thee. 6 If thou have any thing, he will live with thee, and will make thee bare, and he will not be sorry for thee. 7 If he have need of thee he will deceive thee, and smiling upon thee will put thee in hope; he will speak thee fair, and will say: What wantest thou? 8 And he will shame thee by his meats, till he have drawn thee dry twice or thrice, and at last he will laugh at thee: and afterward when he seeth thee, he will forsake thee, and shake his head at thee. Category: Sports stealing land www.downwithisrael**** gaza holacaust israel jews muslims christans Michael Jackson has become a Muslim. The singer changed his name to Mikaeel in a ceremony at a friend's Los Angeles home just days before he is due in court. The cash-strapped star - who was raised as a Jehovah's Witness - was convinced to turn to Islam by producer Phillip Bubal and songwriter David Wharnsby.
24 May 2009
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Director Bettina Rheims
19 Jul 2009
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Lyrics: From the Douay-Rheims Bible (1582):[4] Blessed be the Lord God of Israel; because he hath visited and wrought the redemption of His people: And hath raised up an horn of salvation to us, in the house of David his servant: As he spoke by the mouth of his holy prophets, who are from the beginning: Salvation from our enemies, and from the hand of all that hate us: To perform mercy to our fathers, and to remember his holy testament, The oath, which he swore to Abraham our father, that he would grant to us, That being delivered from the hand of our enemies, we may serve him without fear, In holiness and justice before him, all our days. And thou, child, shalt be called the prophet of the Highest: for thou shalt go before the face of the Lord to prepare his ways: To give knowledge of salvation to his people, unto the remission of their sins: Through the bowels of the mercy of our God, in which the Orient from on high hath visited us: To enlighten them that sit in darkness, and in the shadow of death: to direct our feet into the way of peace.
21 Oct 2010
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Guillaume de Machaut (c.1300-1377) We have no precise knowledge of Guillaume de Machaut's early years. He was probably born around 1300 in the diocese of Rheims in Champagne and he may have spent some time studying in Paris where, since the 13th century, the most sophisticated musical theories had been elaborated. A papal bull of Benedict XII dated 1335 states that for about twelve years Guillaume had been the almoner (clericus elimosinarius), secretary and familiar of John of Luxembourg, King of Bohemia whom he accompanied on his expeditions throughout Europe. This great feudal lord, King of Bohemia and stalwart and inalienable ally of the royal house of France, travelled the length and breadth of Europe in pursuit of his various military and political campaigns, and his secretary followed faithfully at his side throughout these often turbulent peregrinations. Machaut lived more like a trouvère than a cleric, traveling widely with and for his patrons (perhaps as far as Poland and Lithuania) and writing his poetry and music on command for courtly occasions. This of course explains the paucity of religious music in his output. Machaut was equally esteemed as both poet and musician during his lifetime; in fact, three-quarters of his surviving work is unaccompanied poetry, full of structural intricacies and love for anagram and other fiddles. His works were eagerly sought out by kings and nobles in France and elsewhere. In 1340 Machaut decided, however, without leaving the employ of his patron, to retire to Rheims as a canon of the cathedral, where he led the sedentary life of a tonsured cleric. Yet he did not entirely forego or reject the world. After the heroic death of John of Luxembourg - who had become blind - at the battle of Crécy in 1346, Machaut cultivated the relationships that bound him to the higher reaches of the nobility and to the royal family of France. For the refined 'knights, ladies and maidens/ Whose hands are beautiful, rounded and shapely' (Dit de la Harpe, 255-256), Machaut composed all abundance of poems. The future king Charles V even paid him a visit at home in 1361. Near the end of his life, his output was copied, at the request of his illustrious patrons and admirers, into a set of manuscripts beautifully written in calligraphic script and richly illuminated. The author himself seems to have supervised their preparation and production, since all the pieces are meticulously ordered: the narrative poems or dits, which are purely literary, come before the compositions in Lyric style and the sacred works (the Mass and Latin motets). Only a part of the writings in lyric style (consisting of lais, ballades, rondeaux, virelais, as they are ordered in the manuscripts) is set to music. In Machaut's case, the poet ultimately takes precedence over the musician. Up to the time of Machaut polyphonic music was generally what has been termed "constructive" in design, Composers wrote the music literally from the bottom up, with a chant or some other melody (preexistent or newly composed) serving as the foundation. Polyphony was number made audible: This abstract approach to music manifested itself in the mathematical basis of consonance and dissonance, in the isorhythmic principle, in the stratification of rhythmic layers, and in the multiple texts of motets. But there existed another possibility: polyphony where melody, not rhythm, dominated. In monophonic music, which consists of just a single line, melody always dominates; but Machaut, like Adam de la Halle before him, enlarged trouvère monody to create polyphonic pieces which were in essence accompanied song. The expressive setting of a single text was still the foremost consideration; now, however, accompanimental parts were not improvised, but fully written out. Guillaume de Machaut's Mass is probably the best known work of medieval music. It bears the seal of an epoch, the 14th century, as well as that of a man who was a poet, a diplomat, a canon and a composer.
1 Jul 2011
111
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