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5:44
2012 Republican presidential hopeful Rick Santorum accidentally admitted that President Obama created an enormous number of jobs in an interview on CNN. Michael Shure breaks it down.
11 Jul 2011
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6:24
Rick Santorum's wife Karen said gays 'vilify' the 2012 Republican Presidential candidate. The Young Turks host Cenk Uygur breaks it down and goes on to explain how Karen dated an abortion doctor before marrying Rick. *******videocafe.crooksandliars****/david/karen-santorum-gays-vilify-my-husband *******www.thedailybeast****/newsweek/2012/01/15/mrs-santorum-s-abortion-doctor-boyfriend.html Subscribe to The Young Turks: *******bit.ly/eWuu5i Download the politics or entertainment hour of this TYT episode: *******goo.gl/O131y Find out how to watch The Young Turks on Current by clicking here: *******www.current****/gettyt The Largest Online New Show in the World. Google+: *******www.gplus.to/TheYoungTurks Facebook: *******www.facebook****/tytnation Twitter: *******twitter****/theyoungturks
2 Apr 2012
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8:25
In today's show, we talk about the internet ruining your brain, Instagram & Facebook, Mississippi leading the nation in other things, and Rick Santorum.
11 Apr 2012
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6:04
The former Pennsylvania senator answers the Big Question, "Does the free market corrode moral character?" For more videos from this series please go to: *******new.bigthink****/topics/templeton-big-question *******www.templeton****/market
19 Nov 2008
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8:25
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18 Mar 2012
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0:25
According to an email sent to supporters, former Pennsylvania Senator Rick Santorum has been encouraged to run for President so much by his fans that he will take the next step towards candidacy, likely announcing his exploratory status on Fox News during an interview with Greta Van Susteren’s “On The Record” Wednesday evening.
7 May 2011
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0:25
Former Pennsylvania Senator Rick Santorum became the third major candidate to announce his intentions to run for President during a Wednesday evening interview with Fox News’ Greta Van Susteren. After appearances by former 2008 GOP Presidential nominee Arizona Senator John McCain, former potential 2012 hopeful South Dakota Senator John Thune, and South Carolina Senator Jim DeMint to discuss President Obama’s budget speech, Santorum announced in a sit down interview with Van Susteren that he has created an exploratory committee in order to see whether or not he can raise enough money to launch a real Presidential bid. He asked supporters to visit his website in order to donate to his 2012 campaign.
10 May 2011
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0:25
Former Pensylvania Senator and “testing the waters” Presidential hopeful Rick Santorum has added Amanda Kornegay, former fundraising operative for Sharron Angle’s Nevada Senate campaign, as finance director for his potential 2012 campaign. Kornegay led the efforts to raise more than $25 million dollars in the heated battle between outspoken conservative Sharron Angle and Senate Majority Leader Harry Reid during the November 2010 midterms. She has also been influential in fundraising for a number of smaller campaigns, and her prowess is not lost on Santorum, who said in a statement;
17 May 2011
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2:50
BY TRACY PFEIFFER ANCHOR EMILY SPAIN The numbers for the Values Voter straw poll summit are in, and Texan Ron Paul came out on top. Here’s CNN. TJ HOLMES, CNN: “He came out on top in the Values Voter straw poll that was held at a gathering of conservatives in Washington. He got 37 percent of the vote. Herman Cain finished second with 23 percent. Rick Santorum third, with 16 percent. And while Rick Perry and Mitt Romney both came in fourth and sixth, respectively, both in single digits.” What that CNN report didn’t do is add a little caveat to the win that other media have picked up on. Some argue, Paul only won because his supporters, including quote- “busloads of college students,” showed up to vote for him. Here’s a version from MSNBC. “Ron Paul’s the big winner at this weekend’s Values Voter summit. Passionate supporters of the Texas Congressman handed him another straw poll victory.” The Family Research Council was one sponsor of the event, and its Tony Perkins first made the suggestion. And The New York Times’ The Caucus dug up details bolstering the claim. “Only those who registered and paid to attend the conference were allowed to vote. The fee was $99 for the entire three-day meeting, or $75 for a single day, and $50 for students. Saturday morning, Mr. Perkins said, more than 600 people arrived and signed up just for the day, including large numbers of students in support of Mr. Paul.” A writer for The New American says it’s possible Paul’s supporters rallied other votes in his favor, but... “...the reality is that Paul should have been seen as an underdog. Much of the Christian right has looked suspiciously at anyone adopting the label ‘libertarian’ for fear it is an embrace of immorality rather than merely a practical view of the limits of government power.” Not so, says The Right Perspective, arguing media have opted for pick-and-choose coverage of Paul’s performance. “Since winning the CPAC poll for the last two years running, media spin has moved from calling the convention a vital pulse-taker for the mood of conservative Republicans to a more minimized role. ...But audience members may have been swayed by Paul’s speech to the convention Saturday, where he connected his views and modern-day politics to Biblical passages.” But the weekend crew at Fox & Friends won’t be reading too much into the win -- until Paul’s numbers shore up in the polls. CLAYTON MORRIS, FOX NEWS: “As all these people were giving standing ovations for Ron Paul, there were other people in the room who were just part of the congregation and were just looking over constantly at all the standing ovations.” ALISYN CAMEROTA, FOX NEWS: “Nobody can lobby the base like Ron Paul, I mean, as we know from the emails.” “He knows how to win a straw poll. Year after year, he wins the straw poll. But what does it mean? It doesn’t translate past the ‘straw.’” In the latest Fox News/Opinion Dynamics poll, Ron Paul came in at six percent nationally.
10 Oct 2011
249
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2:15
BY ZACH TOOMBS First Florida, then Iowa and, now, Nevada. Efforts to move up the GOP’s early primary and caucus dates has left New Hampshire Republicans upset, and at least five presidential candidates are siding with the Granite State. The Atlanta Journal-Constitution reports those candidates are promising to boycott Nevada’s caucus unless it gives New Hampshire the space it needs for an earlier primary date. “Former pizza executive Herman Cain will boycott Nevada's Republican caucuses, adding his voice to a growing chorus of critics urging the western battleground state to delay its presidential nomination contest by just three days. Cain is the fifth candidate to boycott Nevada's contest, joining former Utah Gov. Jon Huntsman, former House Speaker Newt Gingrich, former Pennsylvania Sen. Rick Santorum and Minnesota Rep. Michele Bachmann...” FOX News explains the shifting Republican primary and caucus calendar. “Nevada moved its caucuses to January 14th. You see all those dates circled. Well, New Hampshire cherishes its role as the second overall voting contest, right after Iowa. But its state laws require its primary be held on a Tuesday, seven days before any other state. Well, that won’t work on this calendar, so New Hampshire asked Nevada to move its caucuses back to January 17th. Nevada said, ‘No, thank you,’ and now New Hampshire is saying, ‘Fine. We just might move our primary to early December.’ The call for a boycott originally came from the former Utah governor -- Huntsman, who’s also skipping out on Tuesday’s debate in Nevada. The decision was made after allegations that front runner Mitt Romney’s campaign had encouraged Nevada GOP officials to move its caucuses up. Former Republican Nevada Governor Robert List told the Las Vegas Review-Journal: “We moved the date for the good of Nevada, not the Romney campaign. But Romney's people were pushing for us to move into January so that he could get some momentum and have a rising tide going into Florida." So, with most pundits, including those at the Las Vegas Sun, agreeing that Romney has Nevada in the bag, the boycott from other candidates may have more to do with politics than principle. “Of the Nevada boycotters, only Cain has achieved front-runner status in national polls lately. And only Cain has established a rudimentary campaign network in the Silver State. So it’s not really costing the most of them much. The problem for Romney … is that he needs Nevada to matter. And for Nevada to matter, there needs to be a race.” Despite the GOP’s scheduling dilemmas, all the major candidates, aside from Huntsman, will be on stage for CNN’s debate Tuesday in Nevada. Transcript by Newsy.
22 Oct 2011
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4:36
Herman Cain, Rick Santorum and even state Republican office holders like Harry Accornero are in a heated competition to see who can out-bigot the other to get those precious tea party votes. Follow me on twitter *******twitter****/#!/gstudio666
28 Oct 2011
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2:15
BY NICOLE THOMPSON ANCHOR MEGAN MURPHY Oops! We’ve all done it - hitting that “reply all” button when you really meant to just hit reply. Well now CBS News political director John Dickerson feels your pain. Here’s CNN with more. “CBS’s new political director down there did reply all on an email that included the Bachmann campaign manager, and in that email the CBS News director admitted that Bachmann would not be getting that many questions during the debate.” Bachmann and her campaign are not happy. Her campaign took to Facebook, sharing a copy of the email and commenting - “...the liberal mainstream media elites are manipulating the Republican debates by purposely suppressing our conservative message and limiting Michele's questions.” The campaign sent a similar email to supporters, calling on them to take to Twitter and criticize CBS News and Dickerson. But Politico’s Ben Smith said Sunday, team Bachmann’s call to action was a failure - “...a search of Twitter suggests that virtually nobody acted on it...This kind of social media campaign can be a sign of a candidate's grassroots strength. Or, in this case, it can be a sign of apparent weakness.” The New York Times reports, this certainly isn’t the first time GOP presidential candidates have gone on the offensive against the so-called “mainstream media”. “Herman Cain has accused the media of bias in the reporting of claims of sexual harassment... Newt Gingrich has all but made media bashing a pillar of his campaign platform... Even when Mrs. Bachmann was riding high in the polls, her relationship with the press was strained, in particular over coverage of the Christian counseling practice of her husband, Marcus.” Bachmann’s not the only one angry at CBS News for allegedly giving less air time to lower-polling candidates. Fellow GOP presidential contender Rick Santorum-- currently polling at 2 percent-- shared his thoughts with Fox News. “I think when there are seven or eight people up there on the stage, seven or eight people should get the equal opportunity. Again, go back to, there was a Pew poll just a week or so ago that asked people if they could name any one of the Republican potential nominees for president and half the people in the country couldn’t name any of us. So the idea that this is a decided race... Let the voters hear from everybody.” The next televised debate will take place on November 22nd in Washington, D.C.-- this one about foreign policy and national security. Transcript by Newsy.
15 Nov 2011
202
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28:32
On Wednesday's CBN Newswatch: Rick Santorum wins big in three races, religious freedom concerns over required birth control coverage, reaction to Tuesday's ruling in favor of California gay marriage, and more... The Christian Broadcasting Network CBN *******www.cbn****
9 Feb 2012
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2:34
BY ZACH TOOMBS It’s a virtual who’s who of conservative activists — from Mike Huckabee to Ann Coulter to Chuck Norris. And, on Friday, GOP presidential hopefuls made their best attempt to woo those potential supporters at CPAC — the annual Conservative Political Action Conference. Speaking on his record as Massachusetts’ governor, Mitt Romney grabbed early unwanted headlines with this ad-libbed comment. “I was a severely conservative Republican governor.” Rachel Maddow’s mocking reaction mirrored that of many others: “Mitt Romney: Not just conservative, but severely conservative.” And from the other end of the spectrum, Rush Limbaugh was left puzzled as well... “I have never heard anybody say ‘I’m severely conservative.’ ” Nitpicky? POLITICO says “maybe,” but: “...by going off-script to use an awkward modifier that no movement conservative would ever affix to themselves, he made clear why, despite vast advantages in money and organization, he’s still struggling to win the trust of a party base needed to secure the GOP presidential nomination. He’s just not a natural fit.” And while Romney touted his conservative highlight reel, Rick Santorum made the case for hardline right-wing politics — an ideology he says is better fit to beat President Obama in November than John McCain’s relatively middle-of-the-road approach in 2008. “Well, I think we have learned our lesson. And the lesson we’ve learned is that we will no longer abandon and apologize for the policies and principles that have made this country great for a hollow victory in November.” Friday was a good day for Santorum: for the first time, a national poll from Public Policy Polling ranked him ahead of Romney. And his speech at CPAC drew nearly unanimous praise in conservative circles. The Washington Times writes: “Santorum's address was not a red vs. blue cheerleader pep rally meant to make Republicans feel good about their brand. Instead it was an adult conversation with conservatives about the future of their movement.” Predictably, it was Gingrich who provided the longest — and, for many, the most volatile — speech among the candidates. The former House Speaker not only took aim at Democrats but he also called out GOP insiders. “We need to teach the Republican establishment a lesson. We are determined to rebuild America, not to manage its decay." Gingrich also used the occasion to roll out his new Conservative Dream Team of supporters. A page dedicated to the team appeared on his website Friday, along with this: A photo of Gingrich and company that The Hill said looked like “an ad for a law firm” — with Rick Perry, Herman Cain and even the Texas Ranger himself filling in as partners. Another GOP presidential hopeful, Ron Paul, skipped CPAC this year. Instead, the candidate focused on some last-minute campaigning in Maine.
13 Feb 2012
159
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1:55
(Image source: Wikimedia Commons) BY CHRISTINA HARTMAN Mitt’s got momentum. Rick’s on a roll. Paul’s got passion. And Newt Gingrich? WOFL: “Where is Newt Gingrich? He seems to have fallen off the face of the map.” C-SPAN: “Newt Gingrich in need of cash.” CNN: “Trouble for Newt Gingrich no doubt about it.” The former house speaker placed fourth — essentially, last — in Maine’s caucus. And he took third in a small but influential Conservative Political Action Conference straw poll. Mother Jones Washington editor David Corn put it this way: “Perhaps the most significant aspect of CPAC poll is Gingrich receiving just 15%. If he can't impress that crowd, it's a bad sign.” To boot — The New York Times is reporting Gingrich is hitting a roadblock in fundraising. And Monday morning — the editorial board of the conservative National Review Online urged the speaker to leave the race and make room for the other not-Mitt candidates. “When he led [Rick] Santorum in the polls, he urged the Pennsylvanian to leave the race. On his own arguments the proper course for him now is to endorse Santorum and exit.” But Gingrich has vowed to stay in the race. And analysts on WTXF say — he’s banking on the southern states of Super Tuesday for a super comeback. “We have those two now, two-man race, Santorum and Romney. It depends, Gingrich should win Georgia. That is his home state.” A Public Policy Polling poll finds — without Gingrich in the running — Rick Santorum gets 50 percent of the GOP vote. But does that mean Gingrich should drop out? The Washington Post’s The Fix blog says, not necessarily. “Gingrich could point out that the poll analysis is wrong — were Gingrich (or Santorum) to drop out, polling shows it would only help [Romney] expand his lead. So those hoping to rally voters around a single ‘conservative alternative’ are misguided. He could argue that Santorum has an equally difficult path to victory.” The week will be relatively quiet in terms of high-profile campaign events. The next contests are in Arizona and Michigan at the end of the month.
14 Feb 2012
83
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0:30
(Image Source Daily Gossip) BY CODY LAGROW What once looked like an easy win for Mitt Romney in Michigan’s primary is turning into a battle for the GOP presidential candidates. NBC explains. "The next major showdown right here in Michigan in less than two weeks, where Santorum hopes to deal rival a devastating loss on what Romney considers his home turf." Romney grew up in Michigan and his father was a well-known governor of the Great Lakes state. The GOP candidate also won the state in the 2008 republican primary. Detroit News reports that Romney will go into the fight with the upper hand. “Romney’s big advantages come from the fact that he has experience campaigning in the state, he has the resources to spend money on television ads in all of the Michigan media markets and his campaign’s organizational advantages.” Romney recently wrote an op-ed piece in Detroit News about the auto bailout and said Detroit would be fine without the president’s intervention. Current TV says this statement shows Romney’s disconnect and could cost him a “w”. “The jobs of millions of workers would have liquidated also. Sorry, Mitt. Your pandering betrayal is not a forgivable sin. And if you lose in Michigan, this is going to be the reason why.” Rick Santorum is gaining momentum in the contest and The Washington Post reports that this is an opportunity for the Pennsylvania conservative to wrangle his way to the White House. “For Santorum, the Michigan contest is a chance to show that he can appeal to more than social conservatives and that he can mount the kind of broad-based campaign needed to win the nomination—and defeat Obama in the fall.” Polling firm Mitchell Research in East Lansing puts Santorum nine points ahead of Romney. The Detroit Free Press asked the firm whether Santorum has the cash to continue. “Steven Mitchell, the president of Mitchell Research, said, ‘Conservatives are uniting behind Santorum…Now we will have to see if Santorum has the financial resources to compete against Romney’s big money in the state in which he was born and raised.’” Michigan voters will head to the polls on February 28th.
16 Feb 2012
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