Results for: risk Search Results
Family Filter:
5:10
How to Reduce Your Gynecologic Cancer Risk|ovarian cancer odor discharge You may dread your regular gynecological exam, but it's the only screening test for cervical cancer. Unfortunately, there aren't tests for other gynecologic cancers (like vulvar, vaginal, ovarian, fallopian tube, and uterine). This makes it even more important to know your risk for these cancers and work with your doctor to reduce your risk factors.
24 Sep 2017
40
Share Video

3:40
How to Reduce the Risk of Prostate Cancer|ua prostate cancer screening Prostate cancer is the most common cancer and the second leading cause of cancer-related deaths among men in the United States.[1] The prostate is a walnut-sized gland behind the base of a man’s penis and below the urinary bladder. Its function is to make seminal fluid, which is the liquid in semen that protects, supports, and helps transport sperm.[2] Once you understand the risk factors of prostate cancer, you can undergo tests, implement lifestyle changes, or take medications or supplements to help reduce your risk of prostate cancer. 1 Learn about personal risk factors. Some of the major personal risk factors for prostate cancer are age and family history. The risk of prostate cancer increases the older you get. Although approximately 75% of the cases of prostate cancer have no pattern or order, about 20% of those with prostate cancer have had cases of the disease in their family previously. There are also approximately 5% of cases that are hereditary. More than 80% of prostate cancers are diagnosed in men over the age of 65. If you have a first-degree relative, which would be a father, brother, or son, with prostate cancer, your risk of developing prostate cancer is two to three times higher than the average risk.
27 Sep 2017
25
Share Video

3:57
How to Lessen the Risk of Throat Cancer|lung cancer treatment options Throat cancer is a major killer of people around the world every year. It strikes a wide variety of people from very different backgrounds. The major reason for this is that there are a number of important risk factors that cut across social, economic, and ethnic divisions. Fortunately, though, medical professionals and scientists have identified some of the biggest and most dangerous risk factors that cause throat cancer. With some determination and a little bit of work, you can drastically decrease your chance of being struck by this horrible affliction. 1 Avoid tobacco products. One of the biggest causes of throat cancer is tobacco use. As a result, eliminating tobacco from your life can definitely reduce the risk of throat cancer. Common tobacco products include: cigarettes, cigars, and chewing tobacco. Long-term use of tobacco products can increase risk of throat cancer exponentially. Some studies have shown that even short-term use of tobacco products can increase risk of throat cancer substantially over individuals who have never used tobacco.
27 Sep 2017
52
Share Video

0:46
Well, it sounds dangerous, doesn’t it? This is exactly why shouldn't just act too smart and risk yourself while showing your courage by riding a Japanese slide.
4 Oct 2017
258
Share Video

0:14
Watch this video very carefully, how this car just almost thrashed this man to a pulp. What do you believe, calculate stunt of just lucky?
18 Oct 2017
86
Share Video

6:20
How to Reduce HPV Related Cancer Risks|hpv vaccine side effects 2018 There are a number of things you can do to reduce your risk of developing HPV related cancer. These include reducing your modifiable risk factors as much as possible, opting for regular Pap tests if you are a woman, and getting vaccinated if you are eligible for one of the new HPV vaccines. It is also important to understand how HPV can specifically affect men as well as women.
24 Sep 2017
34
Share Video

3:36
How to Reduce the Risk of Colon Cancer|colorectal cancer information Colon (or colorectal) cancer is among the top five most frequent types of cancer in both women and men worldwide. About half the people who have colon cancer die from it. However, over 50 percent of colon cancer cases can be avoided by following basic prevention methods. There are many ways to reduce your risk of contracting colon cancer, including regular screening and consultations, quitting smoking, eating well-balanced diet, and getting regular physical activity. 1 Get a colonoscopy. Colonoscopy screenings typically begin when you turn 50 if you have no other colon cancer risk factors, such as relatives who have had colon cancer. If you have a family history of colorectal cancer or inflammatory bowel disease, your physician may advise you to have a colonoscopy before your 50th birthday.[2] Prepare for your colonoscopy screening. The colonoscopy allows doctors to remove any polyps that may be forming in your colon. Polyps take 10 to 15 years to grow and may turn into colorectal cancer. You may be required to fast and go through a colon cleansing. Getting a colonoscopy performed will take less than one day. 2 Get a Fecal Occult Blood Test (FOBT). FOBTs are tests that look for hidden blood in the stool which can be signs of polyp growth or cancer. FOBTs are much less invasive than colonoscopy and can be done once a year.[3] You may often have the option of sampling your stool at home and mailing it, in a container provided to you by your doctor, to a lab to be medically tested.
26 Sep 2017
49
Share Video

2:48
How to Minimize Lung Cancer Risk Without Medicine|mesothelioma lung cancer If you have quit smoking, or are thinking about quitting smoking, and are concerned about your lung health, there are natural ways that reduce your risk of developing lung cancer, including verified methods that are backed up by science, and some unverified methods that have not been scientifically proven to be effective, yet may help you. 1 Quit smoking. If you are a regular smoker, you will have to quit. While quitting is not easy, there are many techniques and medications you can use to help you quit. For more tips on how to quit smoking, click here. 2 Eat more cruciferous vegetables. Cruciferous vegetables help break down harmful toxins present in tobacco.[1] They are rich sources of isothiocyanates, which inhibit the effects of various carcinogens in tar.[2] Some of the cruciferous vegetables are:[3] Cabbage, broccoli, cauliflower, sprouts and kale. 3 Up your intake of vitamin C-rich foods. Vitamin C may prevent or reverse the effects of carcinogens from tobacco.[4][5] Some of the foods rich in vitamin C include: Citrus fruits, papaya, guava, kiwi, watermelon, lemon juice, carrots, spinach, broccoli, and celery. 4 Get more vitamin D. Smoking can cause your vitamin D levels to drop, so it is important to increase your vitamin D by eating foods rich in this antioxidant. Research shows that vitamin D can actually help to protect your lungs.[6] You can find vitamin D in salmon, mackerel, mushrooms exposed to sunlight, tuna, cod liver oil, and egg yolks.[7] You can also get vitamin D by spending time out in the sun.
27 Sep 2017
29
Share Video

7:53
Testosterone Injections as a treatment for testosterone deficiency has increased over the years, as information about the treatment becomes more common. A study shows that over 3% of men in America use prescription Hormone Replacement Therapy. Even so, there is a debate about the use of supplementary testosterone. It has been shown to have many positive effects, but there are also some risks (which are most common when the supplementations are abused, but can occur in anyone depending on the specific person). Positive effects include: Restored libido and sexual function Less fatigue Greater energy levels Weight loss (testosterone raises metabolism, which means the body can better burn body fat) ...and more. Watch this video to learn more about the risks and benefits of testosterone injections. To learn more about HGH injections please look us up on Google at "The Conscious Evolution Institute of Hormone Replacement Therapy" and visit our website at www dot HGH dot TV.
4 Oct 2017
19
Share Video

25:03
Bacteria and viruses are the main causes of pneumonia. Pneumonia-causing germs can settle in the alveoli and multiply after a person breathes them in. Pneumonia can be contagious. The bacteria and viruses that cause pneumonia are usually inhaled. They can be passed on through coughing and sneezing, or spread onto shared objects through touch. The body sends white blood cells to attack the infection. This is why the air sacs become inflamed. The bacteria and viruses fill the lung sacs with fluid and pus, causing pneumonia. Those most at risk include people who: are aged under 5 years or over 65 years smoke tobacco, consume large amounts of alcohol, or both have underlying conditions such as cystic fibrosis, chronic obstructive pulmonary disorder (COPD), asthma, or conditions that affect the kidneys, heart, or liver have a weakened or impaired immune system, due, for example, to AIDS, HIV, or cancer take medicines for gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) have recently recovered from a cold or influenza infection experience malnutrition have been recently hospitalized in an intensive care unit have been exposed to certain chemicals or pollutants Some groups are more prone than others to pneumonia, including Native Alaskan or certain Native American ethnicities.
8 Oct 2017
18
Share Video

21:21
Maintain Good Occupational Hygiene Occupational exposure can be reduced by modifying manufacturing processes to reduce worker contact with metal toxins, collecting and removing fumes, following proper hazardous waste management procedures, and substituting with safer materials/procedures when possible. In most countries, regulations limit employee exposure to toxins and establish worker and workplace health surveillance guidelines. Individuals can be proactive by learning about substances they are coming in contact with, limiting exposure by following safety procedures and wearing the required personal protective equipment, practicing proper skin and hand hygiene, and properly decontaminating before leaving the workplace (Coppotelli 2012). Reduce General Exposure Exposure to metal toxins can also be reduced by understanding the sources of metal exposure (see the section on risk factors) and adopting strategies to reduce contact with them. First, become familiar with symptoms of toxicity and first aid procedures for ingestion of substances containing toxic metals (Barsan 2008). Next, read product labels and know the potential hazards of products. Third, take advantage of established disposal programs and facilities for discarding metal-containing waste. Finally, avoid mercury amalgam dental fillings to reduce mercury exposure, especially when multiple fillings are needed. In one study, individuals with 7 or more mercury fillings had 30-50% higher urinary mercury levels compared to individuals without any amalgam fillings (Dutton 2013). Since studies have shown that exposure to mercury via dental amalgam fillings poses health risks (Geier 2013), removing and replacing existing dental fillings with mercury-free composite material should be considered. Individuals seeking to have their mercury amalgam fillings removed and replaced should seek out a dentist experienced in this procedure, as mercury vapor levels can rise in the surrounding environment if proper procedure
16 Oct 2017
11
Share Video

1:00
This douchebag of a guy risked his and everyone else's lives when he bicycled the entire street on support of one tire. He could have just used an unicycle!
22 Sep 2017
314
Share Video