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Chaine Youtube : RiskVerdict
21 Jul 2017
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Here we have discussed about the benefits of real estate investing and its ways which will provide the help to increases your chances of earning high returns.
25 Jul 2017
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Want to pass CIMA P3 Risk Management in first attempt and you have nothing for your exam preparation. Get you exam P3 braindumps from RealExamDumps website and prepare your exam in just one day. They provide you P3 dumps in PDF format. RealExamDumps is the leading organization in providing certification exam dumps with 100% passing assurance. RealExamDumps is the best source for your exam study material. You can prepare your exam online with the help of our test engine. We provide you P3 real exam questions with money back assurance. So don't waste your time and prepare your exam with our study material and pass it in first attempt.
19 Jul 2017
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Anyone may develop a kidney stone, but people with certain diseases and conditions (see below) or those who are taking certain medications are more susceptible to their development. Urinary tract stones are more common in men than in women. Most urinary stones develop in people 20 to 49 years of age, and those who are prone to multiple attacks of kidney stones usually develop their first stones during the second or third decade of life. People who have already had more than one kidney stone are prone to developing further stones. In residents of industrialized countries, kidney stones are more common than stones in the bladder. The opposite is true for residents of developing areas of the world, where bladder stones are the most common. This difference is believed to be related to dietary factors. People who live in the southern or southwestern regions of the U.S. have a higher rate of kidney stone formation than those living in other areas. Over the last few decades, the percentage of people with kidney stones in the U.S. has been increasing, most likely related to the obesity epidemic. A family history of kidney stones is also a risk factor for developing kidney stones. Kidney stones are more common in Asians and Caucasians than in Native Americans, Africans, or African Americans. Uric acid kidney stones are more common in people with chronically elevated uric acid levels in their blood (hyperuricemia). A small number of pregnant women develop kidney stones, and there is some evidence that pregnancy-related changes may increase the risk of stone formation. Factors that may contribute to stone formation during pregnancy include a slowing of the passage of urine due to increased progesterone levels and diminished fluid intake due to a decreasing bladder capacity from the enlarging uterus. Healthy pregnant women also have a mild increase in their urinary calcium excretion.
21 Jul 2017
29
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25:02
Anyone can get a fungal nail infection, but they are more common in men than women and the elderly than the young. Some additional traits or factors raise the risk of nail fungal infection, these include: diminished blood circulation slow growing nails a family history of fungal infection (genetics) heavy perspiration humid or moist work environment wearing artificial nails wearing socks and shoes that prevent ventilation walking barefoot in damp public places (swimming pools, gyms, and shower rooms) previous injury or infection to the skin or nail diabetes, AIDS, circulation problems, a weakened immune system tight footwear with crowding of toes exercise that causes repeated minor trauma to the hyponychium (where the finger tip attaches to the nail) Older adults are the most at risk of nail fungus infections as lower blood circulation and slower growing nails are part of the natural aging process.
24 Jul 2017
29
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1:20
anginarex com Health Risks Associated With High Blood Pressure- What Are Health Risks Associated With High Blood Pressure? If your blood pressure is too high, it puts extra strain on your blood vessels, heart and other organs, such as the brain, kidneys and eyes. Persistent high blood pressure can increase your risk of a number of serious and potentially life-threatening conditions, such as: heart disease heart attacks strokes heart failure peripheral arterial disease aortic aneurysms kidney disease vascular dementia If you have high blood pressure, reducing it even a small amount can help lower your risk of these conditions.
24 Jul 2017
13
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15:44
What is radiation? Radiation is energy that travels as a wave or particle. Some types of radiation, called ionizing radiation, can be harmful. Radioactivity is ionizing radiation that is given off by substances, such as uranium, as they decay. About half of the ionizing radiation we're exposed to comes from nature. It's in rock, soil, and the atmosphere. The other half comes from man-made sources like medical tests and treatments and nuclear power plants. How much radiation is dangerous? There is always a risk of damage to cells or tissue from being exposed to any amount of ionizing radiation. Over time, exposure to radiation may cause cancer and other health problems. But in most cases, the risk of getting cancer from being exposed to small amounts of radiation is small. The chance of getting cancer varies from person to person. It depends on the source and amount of radiation exposure, the number of exposures over time, and your age at exposure. In general, the younger you are when you are exposed to radiation, the greater the risk of cancer.
30 Jul 2017
12
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21:20
Exposure of the general population to toxic metals may come from the environment or home and can be acute or chronic. It may result from contaminated food, air, water, or dust; living near a hazardous waste site or manufacturing plant that releases metal contaminants; overexposure to metal-containing pesticides, paints, or cosmetics; or improper disposal or cleanup of toxic metal-containing items (such as a broken thermometer). Exposure risks for specific metals include: Lead: Lead-containing plumbing (lead pipes or plumbing solder; in 2007, it was estimated that less than 1% of the public water systems in the United States had lead levels above 5 µg/L) (ATSDR 2007b) Lead-based paints (in buildings built before 1978; this is the predominant source for children) (EPA 2013) Leaded gasoline (although banned in the United States in 1995 for automobiles, previous usage has widely dispersed it in the environment) (Miranda 2011) Foods grown in lead-rich soil (ATSDR 2008a) Mercury: Eating fish or shellfish contaminated with methylmercury (the Food and Drug Administration [FDA] has set a maximum permissible level of 1 part of methylmercury in a million parts of seafood [1 ppm]) (ATSDR 2001). Ocean fish commonly high in mercury include shark, swordfish, king mackerel, and tilefish (Defilippis 2010). Levels of mercury above 1 ppm have also been found in predatory and bottom-dwelling freshwater fish (including bass, walleye, and pickerel) from mercury-contaminated waters (ATSDR 2001) Breathing contaminated workplace air or skin contact during use in the workplace (certain medical and dental treatments as well as chemical or other industries that use mercury) (ATSDR 2000) Release of mercury vapor from dental amalgam fillings (although the FDA deems amalgam fillings safe) (Bernhoft 2012; Jang 2011; Rusyniak 2010; FDA 2009) Contact with elemental mercury from the following household devices: thermometers (the amount of elemental mercury from a broken thermometer spilled in a sm
2 Aug 2017
32
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41:09
A risk factor is anything that affects your chance of getting a disease such as cancer. Different cancers have different risk factors. Some risk factors, like smoking, can be changed. Others, like a person’s age or family history, can’t be changed. But having a risk factor, or even several, does not mean that you will get the disease. Many people with one or more risk factors never get cancer, while others who get cancer may have had few or no known risk factors. Researchers have found several factors that might affect a man’s risk of getting prostate cancer. Age Prostate cancer is rare in men younger than 40, but the chance of having prostate cancer rises rapidly after age 50. About 6 in 10 cases of prostate cancer are found in men older than 65. Race/ethnicity Prostate cancer occurs more often in African-American men and in Caribbean men of African ancestry than in men of other races. African-American men are also more than twice as likely to die of prostate cancer as white men. Prostate cancer occurs less often in Asian-American and Hispanic/Latino men than in non-Hispanic whites. The reasons for these racial and ethnic differences are not clear. Geography Prostate cancer is most common in North America, northwestern Europe, Australia, and on Caribbean islands. It is less common in Asia, Africa, Central America, and South America. The reasons for this are not clear. More intensive screening in some developed countries probably accounts for at least part of this difference, but other factors such as lifestyle differences (diet, etc.) are likely to be important as well. For example, Asian Americans have a lower risk of prostate cancer than white Americans, but their risk is higher than that of men of similar backgrounds living in Asia. Family history Prostate cancer seems to run in some families, which suggests that in some cases there may be an inherited or genetic factor. (Still, most prostate cancers occur in men without a family history of it.)
5 Aug 2017
15
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3:00
Watch this video of Paras Hospitals Gurgaon in which Dr. Anukalp Prakash, Consultant- Gastroenterology, Paras Hospitals Gurgaon is talking about Causes and Risk Factors of Hepatitis.
8 Aug 2017
5
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2:06
Watch this video of Paras Hospitals Gurgaon in which Dr. Amit Mittal, Consultant Gastroenterology, Paras Hospitals Gurgaon is talking about Hepatitis - Types, Causes & Risk Factors.
8 Aug 2017
7
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21:20
Lead: Lead-containing plumbing Lead-based paints (in buildings built before 1978 and is the predominant source for children) Foods grown in lead-rich soil Mercury: Eating fish or shellfish contaminated with methylmercury (includes shark, swordfish, king mackerel, tile fish, bass, walleye, pickerel) Breathing contaminated workplace air or skin contact during use in the workplace Release of mercury vapor from dental amalgam fillings Cadmium Tobacco smoke Eating foods containing cadmium (levels are highest in grains, legumes, and leafy vegetables, fish and shellfish) Contact with cadmium from household products (electric batteries and solar panels)
24 Jul 2017
27
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