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1:19
Multiple Sclerosis Society Volunteer Named Kohl's Kids Who Care National Scholarship Winner
1 Aug 2007
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1:45
On average, another person is diagnosed with multiple sclerosis every hour in the U.S. MS is a devastating disease that can slowly rob patients of everything from their sight to control of their muscles. Doctors aren’t sure what causes it, but they’re finding better ways to tame it. They’re placing electronic probes in the brain – and giving some desperate patients relief.
2 Aug 2007
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1:34
Landmark Study in The Lancet: Patients Treated With Betaseron After First MS Attack Experienced Significant Delay in MS Progression Patients treated with Betaseron (interferon beta-1b) shortly after their first clinical MS event or "attack" showed a 40 percent lower risk of developing confirmed disability progression compared to patients in whom treatment was delayed. The results which were fast-tracked and published in The Lancet this week provide the first controlled evidence that delaying Betaseron treatment has an effect on later accumulation of disability, as observed over the three-year study period. No other MS therapy has demonstrated this effect in this early patient population. The BENEFIT study (BEtaseron in Newly Emerging multiple sclerosis For Initial Treatment), sponsored by Bayer HealthCare, compared Betaseron treatment initiated after a first clinical event with delayed treatment. The study was conducted at 98 sites in 20 countries and included a total of 468 patients.
3 Aug 2007
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1:32
Kennedy Krieger Institute Study Enhances Understanding of Brain Plasticity and Motor Skills, Signaling Advancements for Future Rehab Practices In a study published in the August issue of Nature Neuroscience, researchers at the Kennedy Krieger Institute in Baltimore, Maryland found that there are separate adaptable networks controlling each leg and there are also separate networks controlling leg movements, e.g., forward or backward walking. These findings are contrary to the currently accepted theory that leg movements and adaptations are directed by a single control circuit in the brain. The ability to train the right and left legs independently opens the door to new therapeutic approaches for correcting walking abilities in patients with brain injury (e.g., stroke) and neurological disorders (e.g., cerebral palsy and multiple sclerosis).
7 Aug 2007
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3:15
PRINCESS DIANA CONCERT-1 JULY WEMBLEY STADIUMERSIN FAIKZADE WAS THERE.We know Ersin Faikzade as a good write and a artistic character. He have been confessed with his projects what has voluntarily carried out for disabled people. by give of concerts and write texts for magazines, he confessed this way confessed with his cultural and helpful character for many people in Europe and also in United Kingdom.in His texts he write under others abouth Princess Diana, Soraya Esfandiary, Queen Farah Pahlavi,Grace Kelly of Monaco, Ataturk, Mevlana, Zeki Muren(legendary singer of Turkey), Wales, Izmir,Multiple Sclerosis,Palermo,Down Syndrom... as well as he we know him as a man who helps people.. and such as Ersin faikzade says.. help each other means a live full peace.He is supporting some association Forexample Multiple Sclerosis,Down Syndrome,Mothers Associate,The Princess Of Wales Diana Foundation,Turkish Education Foundation,LEPROSY RELIEF ASSOCIATION & FOUNDATION
18 Aug 2007
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3:50
John Cann Walks after 11 years of paralysis using a simple non-invasive free therapy, discovered by Andrew K Fletcher, who has shown beyond any shadow of doubt that gravity plays a vital roll in the circulation of fluids and that posture in relation to the constant direction of gravity is of paramount importance when restoring function to all neurological and non-neurological damage. Conditions this therapy has helped include: Parkinson's Disease, Multiple Sclerosis, Cerebral Palsy, spinal cord injury, short term memory loss, heart conditions, blood pressure, respiratory problems, psoriasis, thrombosis, varicose veins, oedema, optic nerve damage, bladder infections, scoliosis of the spine, leg ulcer, gangrene, even completely restoring sight in supposedly irreversible optic nerve damage caused through long term progressive ms, to the point where a lady with long term damage to the optic nerve, who could not make out the edge of her monitor, completed an Open University degree and can now legally drive a vehicle on the road without wearing glasses. Confirmed by her ophthalmologist. Check out my other video's to learn why tilting the bed has an effect on circulation. And please feel free to ask questions or leave a comment. Tested by an independent therapist: *******eregimens****/therapies/MiscTherapies/Inclined%20bed%20therapy.html Currently conducting an experiment to prove that psoriasis is a circulation problem rather than a disease. If you know of anyone who has this condition and would help by providing before during and after photographs of affected areas please ask them to read the information about this experiment at: *******www.psoriasis-help*******/forum/index.php/topic,18376.0.html Google "Andrew K Fletcher" or "inclined bed therapy" to learn more about this amazing discovery. Spinal Cord Injury On Saturday April 15th 2000, John obtained the timber for parallel bars to be erected at his home in Cornwall, On Sunday I went to John's home and completed the job, for tomorrow was to be a momentous occasion indeed. John was left paralysed, in 1990, when surgery to his spine went wrong. He was told that after two years any chance of further recovery would be highly unlikely and for the next six years he experienced little if any change in his condition. Monday morning I am on my way to John's home in Cornwall, to meet with Tim Iredale, who is a news reporter for Carlton Television Southwest. We intended to witness something truly magical. But could not have imagined what was in store for us. John was about walk in front of a television camera and crew for the first time in close to ten years. John had told me that he had regained the ability to move his legs, but I had grossly underestimated how much function John had regained. During the interview, John was asked to show how he manages to get out of bed now and he transferred with ease both in and out of bed, leaning back and lifting his legs. He was then asked to raise his legs while lying on the bed and he obliged with ease. When asked if he could feel when touched on his legs, he replied my legs feel like normal legs instead of heavy weights. John then went on to explain how much of the swelling in his legs had gone-and that this flies in the face of the current act of elevating the legs above the heart. Advise from the medical profession, which John duly ignored in favour of sleeping with his legs down. Fortunately for John this meant that he could now wear ankle braces and special shoes, which would, provided support for his substantially weakened and as yet unresponsive ankles. John approached the parallel bars in his wheel chair and applied the brakes when he was in position. He grasped the two ends of the parallel bars and using his legs he pushed himself into a vertical position. Towering some six feet four inches, John moved one leg in front of the other, bending the knees as he lifted each leg to walk 12 feet to the end of the bars. I turned and looked at Tim and saw disbelief and astonishment flash across his face, I bet my face was a sight to behold too. John then turned his powerful 19 stone body around and walked, yes walked back to his chair. Struggling and somewhat weakened by the experience, he lowered his body into the chair and his face had the expression of a boxer who had just knocked down his opponent. He said casually: 'Was that alright'? John had indeed delivered a powerful blow to his opponent. Fortunately heavy rain prevented us from doing a retake and the rest of the interview took place in John's bedroom. When the story was finished and everyone was ready to leave, I turned and thanked the camera man and Tim Iredale, who turned and said that this is one of those days that you will always remember, one of those days when you know exactly what you were doing. The cameraman said while shaking my hand that: ' it has been a privilege to work with me and witness the results from such a simple application'. I drove home the richest man alive that day and will remember it for the rest of my days. On Monday the 17th April 2000 I waited for the local news on Carlton TV and saw the opening news which pictured me looking down my Naturesway Sleep System, a simple bed designed for to take us into the new millennium. After the interlude the fun really started. John was walking for everyone in the South West of England to see, at least. The news stayed focused on the remarkable effects of two eight-inch blocks tucked under the head end of John's bed. No $billion research, no waiting for the next ten years to see if it works and no room for any refutation of the results, which were plain for everyone to see on Carlton Television, News, Language Science Park, Plympton, Plymouth, Devon, UK. But John is not the only person with a spinal cord injury, who is benefiting from the effects of gravity, in fact there are two more people in the Torbay Area of Devon who are making steady progress. Sunday Independent April 16th,2000 page 4 Burrington Way, Plymouth PL5 3LN UK Heading: RAISING HIS BED TOWARDS THE SKIES, BY ANTHONY ABBOTT. WHEELCHAIR-BOUND Julian Boustead is taking to the skies for a parachute jump to raise awareness about a simple bed treatment that's given him a new lease of life. The 37 year old - who was left paralysed after breaking his neck during a charity assault course run. Struggling to get out of bed in the morning and always felt the cold until he took the simple step of raising the head of his bed on blocks of wood by a matter of inches. Julian, who lives near Torquay, has urged everyone to try the Naturesway Sleep System, Pioneered by West-Country Inventor Andrew Fletcher, and first revealed in the Sunday Independent nearly three years ago. He said; 'I used to feel dizzy when I got up and I couldn't stay outdoors for long because I always felt the cold. 'After the first night, I got out of bed straight away with the help of the nurses and I did not feel faint, My circulation has also improved. I would never put the bed back again and all my family are sleeping on raised beds.' Now Julian, a former professional boxer and equestrian expert who still teaches youngsters riding, has premised Andrew Fletcher he will do a parachute jump this summer to show other sufferers the benefit of the bed treatment. Julian Colour Picture: Sub heading: Wheelchair-bound Julian Boustead will jump from the skies this summer. Picture Steve Porter It was former engineer Andrew who contacted Julian two years ago after learning of his plight and suggested he tried the bed method. Gravity Andrew was fascinated by the way water moved up trees through roots and wandered how the gravity and the flow of water would effect the human body. He put some bricks under the head of his own bed and within four weeks, his wife's varicose veins had disappeared. Since then he has discovered his treatment has helped MS sufferers get some feeling back in their legs and arthritis sufferers. John's story In 1990 I had two slipped discs, and had a lamenectomy which ended up with me being unable to walk. It is thought that a delay of 39 hours for surgery to what was found to be a compression of the spinal cord was responsible for my paralysis. I was lucky enough to get a bed at ROOKWOOD Hospital, a place that I cannot thank or speak highly enough of, they gave me back the will to live. After two years all the slow progress stopped as I had been informed to expect. I had no feeling from the hips down and no movement of the legs at all. Luckily my arms were o.k so transfers to the wheelchair were more of a throw which usually ended with my coccyx hitting the wheel, but as there was no feeling, so it didn't bother me too much. After a few months came the most horrendous phantom pains like a knife attached to the mains that struck anywhere in the legs or feet, for this I was on strong painkillers or if it was too bad injections. When driving my car around a corner, I had to wedge my head against the roof of the car to stop my body from falling over. This was due to damage to the nerves, which used to control the nerves which held my upper body erect, something I used to take for granted as everyone else does. Getting into bed would involve tremendous effort. I would throw my rear onto the bed and then with my right hand holding the wheel, I would pull my left leg up, with my left hand, holding my trouser leg. Then holding the bedding with my left hand, I would pull my right leg up with my right hand. At one stage I had even asked for my legs to be amputated, as they were useless and hung heavily. In addition my toenails would fall out on a regular basis, predominantly the big toe nails, often coming away when I removed my socks. I often bumped my coccyx while transferring from my wheelchair, though I could not tell if I had injured myself, due to the absence of pain. About two years ago a cutting from a paper was sent to me, it was about Andrew Fletcher's raised bed. I rang Andrew and he explained his theory and told me how to raise the bed. The bed was raised eight inches that day, when I saw the bed it looked impossible not to end up on the floor at the foot. However that night was wonderful, the phantom pains stopped and I had a full nights sleep. Slowly things started to improve, improvements such as instead of having to grab my sock or trouser leg to lift my legs onto the bed I could lean back and swing them up, muscles in my thighs started to twitch, turning over in bed became possible without having to grab the side of the bed and pull myself over, not having to pull my legs over by hand. I have experienced so many improvements that creep up and are not noticed until days later. Pains started again and I thought here we go again, but it soon became obvious to me that it was nerve regeneration pains that I was experiencing. Although they felt like previous pains, these stayed in the same place anything from six to twenty four hours. The next time the pains moved further down the leg, now I am glad to say those pains have gone the last ones were in my toes. The present pains are in the feet again but generated from the nerve that runs under the buttocks, now the feeling has come back to that area it makes sitting in the wheelchair most uncomfortable, but that is the next problem to get over, but I will, in the knowledge that something else will improve when the new pains subside. Now, what I would like to say to everyone who reads this is; if you have any medical problem try it, and more importantly "stick with it"! Most of all have faith in the healing power of gravity, it has worked for me, AND WHEN I WALK AGAIN! I will first thank Andrew, and secondly I will let everyone that reads this web page know about it. John Cann Spinal Cord Injury Inclined Bed Study: Location to Post your diary: *******sci.rutgers.edu/forum/forumdisplay.php?f=43 Main Information Thread: *******sci.rutgers.edu/forum/showthread.php?t=53673 Diary of a person already testing the theory: *******sci.rutgers.edu/forum/showthread.php?t=81606 Please help to share this video by hosting it or posting it. Carlton Television has kindly given us permission to do so. Please Rate this video. Andrew K Fletcher
6 Sep 2007
7911
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4:59
Affordable, Easy-to-Use Accessible Technology is Within Reach for People with MS According to a new survey released this week in conjunction with the National MS Society's National Conference, many people living with multiple sclerosis (MS) who experience visual, dexterity, and cognitive challenges report that technology plays a vital role in helping them live with the disease. However, relatively few are using the assistive technologies that could help them overcome many of these challenges.
26 Oct 2007
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6:26
APS is associated with recurrent clotting events (thrombosis) including premature stroke, repeated miscarriages, phlebitis, venous thrombosis (clot in the vein) and pulmonary thromboembolism (blockage of an artery found in the lung due to a clot that has traveled from a vein). It is also associated with low platelet or blood elements that prevent bleeding. Recently, however, even more disease states have been linked with APL including premature heart attack, migraine headaches, various cardiac valvular abnormalities, skin lesions, abnormal movement/chorea, diseases that mimic multiple sclerosis, vascular diseases of the eye that can lead to visual loss and blindness. Keywords: APSFA, APS Foundation, antiphospholipid antibody syndrome, lupus, stroke, dvt, pe, thrombosis, clot, migraine, hughes syndrome, miscarriage, america, usa, anticoagulant, heart attack, APS
25 Jan 2008
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5:33
*******www.globalchange**** Cure for autoimmune diseases such as psoriasis, rheumatoid, Crohn’s disease, ulcerative colitis, multiple sclerosis? Targetting specific immune cells to restore normal immune system with potentially very few side effects. Medical research using immunology. But will pharmaceutical companies wish or be able to fund such research? It will be a technique not a therapy to be sold. Patrick Dixon, conference keynote speaker and futurist.
10 Dec 2008
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6:35
Nutra Pharma is a biotechnology company developing treatments to Multiple Sclerosis, Herpes, HIV and Adrenomyeloneuropathy. Come explore what Nutra Pharma is doing by watching this short video or by visiting us online at *******www.NutraPharma****
18 Mar 2008
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2:34
----GET HIGH? then click SUBSCRIBE----for Gary medical marijuana pot doll is show up to get legal prescription for smoking medical marijuana like montel williams on the montel show. Legal prescription pot. Drops montel-s name from the montel and shows symptoms of multiple sclerosis (MS), and shows Glaucoma symptoms for prescriptions to smoke marijuana / pot. Gary is waiting for an invite to montel-s show to talk about legalizing marijuana. And to puff some high end prescription stuff too. Email us Mr. Williams if gary can meet Montel Williams. Thx- Gary
25 Mar 2008
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1:00
Nearly all people (97 percent) with multiple sclerosis (MS) who have started treatment say their commitment to managing their disease in every way possible is their prime motivation for staying on therapy, according to a new North American survey of people with MS, results of which were released today at the Consortium of Multiple Sclerosis Centers annual meeting in Denver. However, the survey also found that people with the disease can face significant barriers that make it difficult for them to start or stay fully committed to an effective treatment regimen. For more information on this story and others, visit www.newsinfusion****
2 Jul 2008
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0:31
Diseases like Multiple Sclerosis plague our society but you can help with an MS in nursing From Mississippi to Florida Begin Nursing helps you find schools in your area that have the nursing degree you want From RN to Nurse Practioner youre set with an MS in nursing and Begin Nursing
24 Jul 2008
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3:27
Bizzuka sponsored the MS Justice Grillin' event, which is a fundraiser to benefit the Southwest Louisiana Multiple Sclerosis Foundation. But, not only are we sponsors, we're participating as a contestant as well. In preparation, we took a Friday afternoon and held our own Bizzuka Burger Cookoff, in which four brave souls served themselves up as contestants: Shannon Lynd, Senior VP of Production Brian Bille, Internet Marketing Specialist John Olivier, VP of Systems and Development Corey Gaudin, Development Specialist
19 Aug 2008
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4:11
Despite affecting as many as 1 in 800 of us, very little is known about Multiple Sclerosis, and diagnosis is still notoriously tricky. Each year a further 2,500 are diagnosed with the condition in the UK, with symptoms ranging from visual or co-ordination loss to speech or bladder problems. In this video GP Dr Hilary Jones and MS Trust Chief Exec Pam MacFarlane explain more about the condition and the support available for sufferers and their families.
9 Oct 2008
216
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8:40
Aero-TV Profiles The Dash For A Cure -- ALS Awareness In Flight Two Pilots Attempt To Set A Record And Raise Much-Needed Money To Fight A Deadly Disease As noted in the ANN story that profiles the magnificent efforts of two flyers to race around the world and raise money to fight ALS. CarolAnn Garratt and Carol Foy, who have family members diagnosed with Lou Gehrig's disease, will circumnavigate the world in seven days, in a small Mooney M20, attempting to shatter a world record to raise money and awareness for ALS, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. It will be an extraordinary trip... From central Florida, the two will fly non-stop across the United States to San Diego, California. After a quick gas stop and supply replenishments they will set out for Lihue, Hawaii, taking on a trip of approximately 16 hours of flying -- with good tailwinds. Leaving Hawaii, their second longest leg is ahead of them, 3202 nautical miles to Guam. They hope to catch 25 to 30 knot tail winds to help them along. There will be a time and distance check during this leg at which time they might decide to deviate to an extra stop in the Marshall Islands, if necessary. After Guam they'll head for Thailand, another 2618 nautical miles, almost 3000 statute miles, where they will be met by friends (which, they note, is always helpful in a foreign country). This is especially important on this trip to facilitate re-fueling and landing and departure paperwork. An oil and filter change and engine check will be performed during this stop. Leaving Thailand, Garratt and Foy have a long leg across India to Oman then will head down the Gulf of Aden to Djibouti. Crossing Africa they will only stop once in Bamako, Mali, then fly to the Cape Verde Islands off the west coast of Africa. This is a regular jumping off point for sailors and pilots crossing the Atlantic Ocean. With good tailwinds, they will be on their longest non-stop leg, 3303 nautical miles, directly home to Florida. If a low pressure develops during their trip and brings headwinds, they'll have one more stop in the Caribbean, then a short 7 hour final leg home. Aero-TV and ANN wish them great luck and tailwinds... Join Aero-TV On An Around The World Chat With CarolAnn Garratt and Carol Foy! FMI: www.alsworldflight****, www.als****, www.aero-tv****, www.youtube****/aerotvnetwork, *******twitter****/AeroNews Copyright 2008, Aero-News Network, Inc., ALL Rights Reserved.
1 Dec 2008
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